Graduation

Via Concord High School website

A senior class tradition at Concord High School has erupted into a controversy surrounding offensive t-shirts.

School administrators are replacing the senior class t-shirts after discovering references they deemed to have racial overtones. The shirt's design contains word art in the shape of a wave for the school's team nickname, the "Crimson Tide." Embedded in that design are the letters, "K K K" and the phrase "Go White."  

Penn State via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/qFn5HA

Millennials are often painted as entitled, selfie-snapping narcissists, but do they deserve the “kids these days” label?  On today’s show we’ll attempt to transcend the generation gap with a strong defense of the youngsters.

Then, we celebrate graduation season with author George Saunders, whose 2013  commencement address at Syracuse University contained a simple message: “be kinder”. The speech went viral, became a short film, and a book. He’ll explain why it rippled out far beyond that group of graduates.  

Davide Zanchettin via flickr Creatiev Commons / flic.kr/p/h261VQ

We’ve heard the claim before – low-income urban kids aren’t getting to spend enough time in the woods.  But what if outdoor education isn’t just about where you live – but how you’re being raised?

On today’s show, our station wide series The First Decade continues, with a look at environmental education. Plus, a bee researcher explains two new studies that offer increasing evidence that a common form of pesticide is harmful to wild bees. And, Dr. Kanye West?  We discuss the function and failures of honorary degrees.  

Jim Graham / Flicker CC

The headline of this year’s graduation report from the National Student Clearinghouse is that 78 percent of students who start out in traditional 4-year public institutions in New Hampshire wind up graduating within six years.

That’s higher than any state in the country except for Iowa.

Private schools do nearly as well, with 75 percent graduating.

via Q1045

It was the high school commencement address heard ‘round the world. When English teacher David McCullough, Jr. addressed 2012 graduates from the public high school in Wellesley, Massachusetts, he told them, "You are not special."

Pigeonpie via Flickr Creative Commons

 

New Hampshire's overall high school graduation far exceeds the national average, but it ranks in the middle when it comes to low-income students.

(Photo by thedamnmushroom via Flickr Creative Commons)

Part 1: The Rise of the Brogrammer

Produced by Jonathan Lynch

In the 1980s classic comedy revenge of the nerds, there was a clear cut boundary between the titular nerds and the preppy, popular frat boys that sought to humiliate them. A recent culture trend in Silicon Valley is looking to completely upend that convention by fusing the two. A new breed of software engineers is on the horizon, and they are just as likely to fine tune code as they are to lift weights and party on the weekend.

WOM's 2012 Commencement Speech

May 16, 2012
Xiabo Song, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Charles Wheelan’s unconventional advice for graduates got us talking about the twists and turns of our own post-graduate lives. The path life takes, as we know, zigs as often as it zags…so Virginia Prescott asked a few colleagues to record what they wish they’d been told on that expectant day.

CHARLES WHEELAN, professor at Dartmouth College and the University of Chicago and is author of 10 ½ Things No Commencement Speaker Has Ever Said and Naked Economics, veered off the motivational script when addressing the 2011 class at Dartmouth, telling the graduates “your worst days lie ahead.”

Wheelan on Talk of the Nation

Police Cadets Graduate With Heavy Hearts

Apr 13, 2012

Less than twenty-four hours after one of the bloodiest episodes in New Hampshire Law Enforcement history, a new class of police cadets graduated from the academy.

Friends and family of New Hampshire’s newest law enforcement agents filled the room to see the 157th police academy class receive their certificates.

But the mood in Concord was bittersweet as Governor John Lynch addressed the crowd.