Guns

Sean Hurley

Several hundred students from High Schools across New Hampshire gathered at the State House for the March on Senators. NHPR’s Sean Hurley sends us his report.

There was chanting…and speeches…but organizer Jennifer White said that she and her fellow students didn’t want to simply repeat last month’s rally. “I think that's a big thing for why we wanted this to be so focused on our senators,” White said, “Because we want to try to keep moving forward with change.”

This March was less of a public rally - more a group meeting with a number of democratic legislators.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Students from across New Hampshire walked out of their schools -- and some gathered at the State House -- to call for stricter gun control on Friday.

But as NHPR’s Jason Moon reports, at a Catholic high school in Manchester, students took part in the national movement in their own way.

Britta Greene for NHPR

Students across the country and New Hampshire are planning another walkout to call attention to gun violence at schools Friday.

Students in at least a dozen New Hampshire middle and high schools have walkouts planned as part of a national event to mark the 19th anniversary of the Columbine school shooting. 

NHPR Staff

Ahead of another student walk out to protest gun violence, around 200 gun rights advocates had their say outside the New Hampshire statehouse Saturday.

The National Constitutional Coalition of Patriotic Americans organized similar events outside statehouses across the country. Despite biting cold weather, gun owners and second amendment advocates from across New Hampshire showed up to hear a range of speakers and to show opposition to any further firearm restrictions.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Farmers would be allowed to carry loaded rifles across their fields under a bill passed by the New Hampshire House.

The bill seeks to modify a current law that prohibits the carrying of loaded rifles or shotguns in motor vehicles, snowmobiles or aircraft. The bill passed by the House on Thursday would limit the prohibition to vehicles in motion, and would create an exemption for farmers protecting their crops and livestock.

James Napoli

After the Parkland shooting last month, Hanover High School junior Dakota Hanchett heard someone at The New York Times had reached out to a teacher at school, asking if they knew any students that used firearms regularly.

Of all the schools in the area, Hanover High was an odd choice for this request, Dakota knew. It’s in an Ivy League college town, one of the most liberal communities in New England. 

Sean Hurley / NHPR

  Students marched in rallies across the country this past weekend to bring awareness to gun violence and school safety. The "March for Our Lives" rallies were part of a national movement led by students of a high school in Parkland, Fla., where a mass shooting took place last month.

Molly Robert, a senior at Kennett High School in North Conway, spoke with NHPR two weeks ago while students were preparing for the event. She joined Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley today to talk about what's next for student activists here in the Granite State.

 

Sean Hurley

March for Our Lives rallies took place around the country - and across the state this past Saturday in Portsmouth, Peterborough and Nashua, among other places. 

In Concord, an estimated 4,000 people convened at the State House following a march from Concord High School. NHPR’s Sean Hurley was there. 

Jason Moon for NHPR

A crowd of several hundred people turned out for the March for Our Lives event in Portsmouth on Saturday.

The rally featured speeches from students from several high schools in the region, as well as teachers, parents, and elected officials.

A lot of people hear "cooperative business" and think of their local food co-ops. But, the co-op model isn't limited to bulk bins of quinoa - it was designed to share profits with workers and give small businesses leverage against megastores.

So, what role do they play in the Granite State? 

Plus, we'll hear from area high school students, in this post-Parkland moment, who are organizing to tell lawmakers: Never Again. 

Chris Jensen for NHPR

The New Hampshire House voted to allow people to carry loaded guns on ATVs, snowmobiles and other off-highway recreational vehicles. A bill lifting existing restrictions passed 181-148 on Thursday but will still need Senate approval before taking effect.

Jason Moon for NHPR

In Portsmouth, students had planned a walkout for the morning but it was interrupted by the snow storm, which caused a delayed school opening.

But that didn’t keep Portsmouth students from having their message heard.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Governor Chris Sununu said Wednesday he wants his hand-picked school safety task force to research the effectiveness of arming school employees and if stronger background checks could help prevent gun violence.

The first-term Republican's School Safety Preparedness Task Force met for the first time Wednesday, the same day students across the state walked out of the classroom to honor the 17 people killed in the mass shooting at a school in Parkland, Fla.

Via Friends of Kennett HS Facebook page

Students across the U.S. and around the Granite State will be walking out of school Wednesday calling for stronger gun control and school safety reform. This follows a national movement led by students of a high school in Parkland, Florida where a mass shooting took place in February.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Molly Robert, a senior at Kennett High School in North Conway. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Social studies teacher Rob Nadeau’s journey to the New Hampshire State House began last fall in his Hopkinton Middle High School classroom. While teaching an Intro to Law class, he said he noticed his students were shocked to learn that in New Hampshire, permitted gun owners were allowed to bring their firearms into a school building. 

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Several hundred students walked out of classes at Hanover High School Friday afternoon in recognition of shooting victims in Parkland, Florida last month.

Chanting “we want change” and “never again,” they marched to the local post office, where they sent off more than a thousand letters to state and federal officials. 

It’s not often that a political candidate announces his or her platform, and then is immediately challenged by passionate opponents.

But last week, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Steve Marchand stood on the steps of the Lebanon City Hall taking questions - not from reporters, but passionate gun rights advocates.

Meg Kelly; NPR

NPR's senior editor and correspondent for the Washington Desk, Ron Elving, joins us to talk about the biggest news in our nation's capital this week, including President Trump's trade announcements, the resignation of the President's top economic advisor, Gary Cohn, and more. 

Lauren Chooljian / NHPR

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Steve Marchand laid out his plan to curb gun violence Tuesday, and his announcement in Lebanon inspired an impromptu public debate about the 2nd Amendment.

Marchand is the only Democrat so far in the race against incumbent Republican Governor Chris Sununu.

NHPR File Photo

Concord Police Lt. Michael Pearl says there are many problems with arming teachers with guns--something the President has suggested--to keep schools safe.

 

Speaking Tuesday on NHPR's The Exchange, he said there are training and liability issues. He also questions how a teacher would react in a critical moment.

 

"I don’t think it’s a viable solution. There are so many other options that we could work toward for prevention and awareness and training, that that’s not part of the equation," Pearl said. 

 

AP

 

Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter has signed on in support of legislation proposing a ban on assault weapons, including the AR-15, the gun used in the Feb. 14 shooting at a Florida high school that left 17 dead.

 

She says the bill aims to stop the sale of military-style rifles and assault weapons. Co-sponsors said Monday that it would reinstate and improve the assault weapons ban that last expired in 2004.

 

How School Shootings Are Changing Education

Feb 23, 2018

We look at how school shootings is impacting students, teachers, and school communities, after the shooting in Parkland, FL.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Town officials in Epping held a school safety forum at the local high school last night. The meeting came just a day after a juvenile was arrested in relation to a threat made at the school.

The meeting drew a strong crowd of parents, teachers, and students. They heard from school administrators and local police, like Police Chief Michael Wallace, about the security precautions already in place.

“Every incident is different, but we like to feel that we have at least taken the steps necessary to ensure the safety of kids – that is first and foremost.”

Forrest Seavey

The New Hampshire House of Representatives voted down a bill today, HB1542, which would allow revolvers and pistols on state college campuses.

The vote comes just weeks after a school shooting in Parkland, Florida left 17 students dead.

Dozens of mothers and supporters of the group Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America showed up to protest the proposed legislation.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 23, 2018

Feb 22, 2018

After the Parkland Florida school shooting, police respond to a number of threats at high schools in New Hampshire, and the House of Representatives votes down a bill would have allowed firearms on state college campuses.  Senate Republicans propose a bill to reauthorize Medicaid expansion for another five years.  And a bill to raise the minimum marriage age in New Hampshire to 16 years of age is headed for a full House vote. 

Jason Moon for NHPR

After the latest mass shooting at a school in Florida, there's one idea most policy makers seem to agree on: If you see something, say something. But as NHPR's Jason Moon reports, school officials and parents in one New Hampshire town are finding that's a lot more complicated than it might seem.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Pistols and revolvers would be allowed on the campuses of New Hampshire's public colleges, universities and community colleges under a bill up for a vote in the House.

House lawmakers are set to vote Thursday on a bill that would allow anyone who is not otherwise prohibited by state or federal law to carry a gun to bring weapons onto the grounds of any University System of New Hampshire campus or community college campus. Currently, the campuses ban guns other than those carried by law enforcement.

Gun Store / Flickr Creative Commons

Speaking to a group of reporters on Wednesday, Gov. Chris Sununu would not say whether he  supports any changes to state-level gun laws in the aftermath of the mass shooting that claimed 17 lives at a Florida high school last week.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

Along a party-line vote, the Republican-controlled New Hampshire Senate voted down a bill on Thursday that sought to ban so-called “bump stocks” in the state.

On the Senate floor, GOP Sen. Sharon Carson said the bill was poorly worded, and wouldn’t accomplish its goal of preventing mass shootings.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Gun laws are always divisive in the Live Free or Die state, but Tuesday, lawmakers are taking up a bill that is dividing a normally united front in the Republican-controlled state house: Gun rights groups.

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