guns

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It was a long first day for the New Hampshire House, as lawmakers debated dozens of bills to begin the 2016 session.

The House passed a proposal, 206 to 146, to allow people to carry a concealed firearm without a license. A similar measure passed the House and Senate but was vetoed by Governor Hassan last year.

Karla via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/gr3Bno

After a group of anti-government activists took over an Oregon wildlife refuge last weekend, news outlets are struggling with how to identify them and their goals. On today’s show, a media reporter says in today's partisan, all-in media landscape, news reporters have an obligation to choose words carefully.

Then, 2015 was a banner year for science, from Pluto’s photo shoot, to the Ebola vaccine. So what's next? We'll hear about some of the big ideas in store for 2016, including the future of the gene editing tool: CRISPR.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Officials say 11,000 New Hampshire state employees will begin mandatory training on active shooter situations next month.

The Concord Monitor reports Gov. Maggie Hassan's office developed the course in conjunction with the New Hampshire Department of Safety following the San Bernardino, California, mass shooting that killed 14 people earlier this month.

The two-hour class will teach employees what to do if an active shooter ever entered a state building. It's based on a national model that also stresses the warning signs of suspicious activity.

Michael Saechang / Flickr/CC

Two more high-profile mass shootings this past month have rekindled the national debate over guns, gun rights, and gun regulation. Politicians have weighed in from the Presidential campaign trail and on Capitol Hill, but common ground remains elusive. Some say we need to tighten laws and oversight in the interest of public safety, while others say the solution is for more civilians to arm themselves in the interest of self-defense.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As more details come out about the shooting in San Bernardino, terrorism threats and measures to restrict guns have become part of the debate surrounding national security.

NHPR spoke with both of New Hampshire’s Senators this morning about one of President Obama’s proposals: banning the sale of guns to those on the government’s no-fly list.

On the night of President Obama’s address, Republican Kelly Ayotte tweeted that the country needs to prevent those on the no-fly list from accessing guns.

flickr/barjack

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition most Monday mornings for "On The Political Front."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte says those on the no-fly list should be banned from purchasing guns.

Ayotte made her position known Sunday on Twitter, saying that those on the watch list should not be able to purchase firearms.

She also called for due process for Americans who are wrongfully on the list.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Hillary Clinton told an audience at Keene State College in New Hampshire that more stringent gun laws would save lives, and if she wins election she’d consider implementing a federal gun buyback program, and using executive powers to require universal background checks for gun purchases.

NHPR

The New Hampshire House voted in a nearly a 2-1 margin to reject a bill to require criminal background checks on all commercial firearm sales.

Prior to the vote, Republican John Burt from Goffstown, argued that requiring criminal background checks would be a waste of time.

“All this bill is going to do is interrupt law-abiding citizens, that’s all any gun legislation does, because the criminal will always have his gun,” Burt said yesterday.

Gun Store / Flickr Creative Commons

  The House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee will hear arguments Thursday on a bill that would expand background checks for gun sales in the state.

The bill, sponsored by five Democratic representatives and one Republican senator, would require all commercial sales or transfers use a licensed firearms dealer. Licensed dealers are required to vet buyers through the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, or NICS. But sales at gun shows or through personal ads are currently possible without background checks.

22860 / Flickr/CC

With a new bill addressing how Granite Staters are allowed to carry a concealed gun, many are tapping in to the perennial conversation about concealed versus open carry. And while the right to bear arms is well-established in New Hampshire, there’s still debate about the who, where, and how when it comes to firearms.

GUESTS:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

    

The Senate Judiciary committee is expected to hear testimony Thursday afternoon on a bill that would repeal the requirement to obtain a license to carry a concealed gun.

The hearing is likely to draw a large crowd of gun rights advocates and those who have concerns about loosening the state’s firearms regulations.

Wolfeboro Republican and Senate Majority Leader Jed Bradley is the bill’s prime sponsor.

He joined Morning Edition to talk about his proposal.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Legislators can again carry concealed weapons on the floor of the N.H. House and in the legislative office building after the Republicans-led house voted to undo a prohibition on the practice put in place two years ago by Democrats.

The 228-149 vote came following a debate where Democrats like Len DiSesa, former deputy police chief in Portsmouth, argued allowing guns in the chamber risks public safety.

“The only people who should be armed in the House of Representatives are trained police officers.”

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

The Manchester Police Department has announced the formation of a multi-agency collaboration to tackle gun and gang-related crime in the city.

  The group was recently awarded a $50,000 grant from a federal Department of Justice program. The money will be used to increase patrols in high crime areas and parole check-ins with probationers and at-risk youth. Manchester Chief David Mara says a big part of this program is showing potential offenders that they mean business.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

Former Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was in New Hampshire Wednesday pushing for stronger gun laws.

Giffords was shot in the head during a campaign event in 2011, and is in the midst of a nine-state tour. She says strengthening gun laws would protect victims of domestic violence.

She made stops in Manchester and Concord on behalf of Americans for Responsible Solutions.

Executive director Pia Carusone says keeping the state’s Congressional Democrats in office is critical to the organization’s cause.

 A New Hampshire police chief has been cleared of a charge of negligently storing firearms at his home after a 15-year-old boy fatally shot himself there.

Judge Edwin Kelly found Danville Police Chief Wade Parsons not guilty on a charge that he failed to properly secure his service revolver in a bedroom closet.

Jacob Carver, the son of Parsons' girlfriend, used the handgun to kill himself on March 11, 2013.

J. Stephen Conn via Flickr CC

The House has killed a bill that allowed people barred from buying guns for mental health reasons to prove to a judge they're capable of owning a firearm.

Sturm, Ruger Recalls Rifle For Trigger Issues

Apr 14, 2014

One year after its release, Newport-based firearms manufacturer Sturm, Ruger is recalling a popular rifle similar to the AR-15.  

Gun Store / Flickr Creative Commons

House lawmakers have voted 242-118 to kill a bill that would have expanded background checks for gun sales in New Hampshire.

New Hampshire lawmakers are mulling two bills that would expand background checks for gun purchases.

The House is expected to vote Wednesday on legislation that would require private sellers to conduct sales through licensed firearm dealers who, under federal law, must perform background checks on prospective buyers.

A bill before the House Judiciary Committee would exempt gun permit records from the state’s right-to-know law.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Gun rights advocates pushed back at a public hearing Tuesday against a bill that would require universal background checks for firearm sales in New Hampshire.

Amanda Loder / NHPR

  In the wake of the Newtown shootings, policy makers in New Hampshire and around the country asked themselves if there are policies that need changing. And one area where compromise seemed plausible was improving mental health reporting in background checks.

That was the subject of a bill before a state Senate committee today.

However, the proposal ultimately united groups --- ranging from the Second Amendment Sisters to the Disabilities Rights Center -- in opposition.

The bill aims to make it harder for New Hampshire residents with mental problems to acquire guns, and its dividing gun rights groups.

The proposal sponsored by Dover democratic Senator David Watters doesn’t tighten any gun laws.

Instead, it forces the state to share information regarding people who have been deemed incompetent by a court with the federal government.

N.H. is currently one of more than a dozen states that doesn’t share such mental health information with the National Instant Criminal Background Check index. 

This week, the legislature returns and hears new bills. Up before the Senate judiciary committee are a proposal to establish domestic violence as a separate crime and one requiring certain persons with mental illness to be barred from owning guns and placed on a federal registry. On Thursday, the House holds its first hearing on a bill to repeal the death penalty.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Many schools in New Hampshire enhanced their security in response to the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. a year ago.

Those new measures come at a big cost to school districts.

And they’re forcing school officials to decide what type of security works for their buildings and their communities.

Even the head of Nashua’s school district needs clearance before he’s allowed into any of the city’s 17 schools.

“Hi, Mr. Conrad. Left door,” the secretary inside Elm Street Middle School says over the intercom.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

The news was hard to fathom a year ago: twenty first graders and six educators shot to death during an ordinary school day in Newtown, Connecticut.  Afterward, the national soul-searching seemed to reach new depths, with President Obama insisting “these tragedies must end, and to end them we must change.”  At the time, polls showed a majority of Americans agreed some aspects of gun laws could be altered, expanding background checks, for instance.   But Washington lawmakers failed pass legislation, and the debate has since shifted to the states.  Both sides have scored victories in state leg

Manchester police are still determining whether charges will be filed after a 5-year-old boy accidentally shot himself early Saturday morning.

alliance1911 via Flickr Creative Commons

As Instagram passes its third birthday, a small but growing community of users are beginning to utilize the website for the private exchange of goods. Two million of the site’s annual photo uploads are items being put up for sale, with the actual negotiations taking place via comment threads and private messages.

Among the many items being legally sold through Instagram are firearms.  Brian Ries is Senior Social Media Editor at The Daily Beast and joins us to explain.

Gun Enthusiasts Key To N.H. App Developer's Success

Oct 11, 2013
Amanda Loder / NHPR

Today, we wrap up our series The Download on New Hampshire’s App Economy with the profile of an independent developer.  In some ways, it’s a classic story: he left his full-time job to work on his program at home in Derry.  But  he’s anything but a stereotypical computer geek.

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