Habitat

Scott Heron; Flickr

What couldn't have a Week of Summer Favorites without including moose and loons!  For many Granite Staters, these creatures symbolize what makes our wild places special, but both face threats that are reducing their numbers. We'll discuss these threats, and ongoing efforts to support these two beloved N.H. animals.

This show originally aired on August 1, 2017. 

New Hampshire Fish & Game

Climate change, which causes rising temperatures, increasingly severe weather events, and shrinking habitats, negatively impacts the moose and loon populations of New Hampshire more than any other factors -- including human interference from road construction or hunting and fishing practices.

That's according to longtime wildlife observers, who joined The Exchange to deliver an update on these two beloved new Hampshire species. 

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services / Flickr/CC

There’s no way around it. This week, Something Wild is a little thick. Like hundreds of pages thick but stay with us.

  

  

So the thing about “nature shows” - even this one - is that we tend to talk about plant and animal species in pretty independent terms. "The red-tailed hawk eats this, sounds like that, does this in the winter…" But as we’ve tried to explain over the years (here at Something Wild) the hawk is just one resident in complex ecological puzzle; she interacts with other animals and plants in the neighborhood. 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services / Flickr/CC

There’s no way around it. This week, Something Wild is a little thick. Like hundreds of pages thick but stay with us.

N.H.'s New Ten-Year Action Wildlife Plan

Dec 3, 2015
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services / Flickr/CC

The state's new ten-year wildlife action plan was announced last month, laying out priorities for New Hampshire's natural resources and critters. We'll look into what the plan entails, and how its used in towns weighing conservation against other considerations.

Guests:

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

One of the state’s biggest environmental organizations is finishing the fundraising for a 1,300 acre conservation deal in North Conway. Once it’s finished, the land will be added to the 4,000 existing acres of the Nature Conservancy’s Green Hills Preserve, where it will provide recreation for people, and habitat for plants and animals.

But before the conservancy closes the deal it wants to know what it’s getting, and to figure that out it assembled plant and wildlife experts from all over the state for a sort of naturalist marathon.

iStockPhoto

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: How are monarch butterflies doing today? They used to pass through my area in big numbers but in the last few years there seem to be many fewer.                  -- Bill Wright, Erie, PA

Sam Evans-Brown

Wildfires out West and in New Hampshire have been making headlines this spring and summer. Wildfires have burned 177 acres in the Granite State this year, damaging twelve buildings and injuring three people.

But when there aren’t any fires it can also lead to problems. Now some organizations have to set fires on purpose, to preserve a vanishing habitat.

If you want to get an idea what some parts of New Hampshire used to look like, you’ve got to find a spot where people don’t live. Like, alongside an airport runway.