Health

Brought to you in part by: Dartmouth-Hitchcock

When the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended a half-dozen years ago that preteen girls be vaccinated against human papillomavirus, two things happened.

A lot of parents and some conservative groups were jarred by the idea of immunizing young girls against a sexually transmitted virus. And uptake of the vaccine has been poor — only about a third of 13- to 17-year-old girls have gotten the full three-shot series.

The Obe$ity Battle: Why Solving it is So Hard

Sep 23, 2011
Graphic Created by Sara Plourde / NHPR

Today health reporter Elaine Grant shines a light on the epidemic itself, which is costing the U.S. more than $150 billion dollars a year in medical spending alone.  

When Jennifer Riccio was in college, she started gaining weight. “I couldn’t really figure out what I was doing differently. In my mind I didn’t really have any difference in eating, or exercise habits at that age.”

Mystified, she visited doctor after doctor.

It was the beginning of a 15-year journey to determine why she kept putting on pounds.

Photo: iStock

In 2002, Ken Jue found himself going to funeral after funeral. But at the time Jue wasn’t sure what was killing so many of his mental health patients.

Ten years ago, lots of people were asking the same questions as Ken Jue.

Why were people diagnosed with bi-polar disorder, schizophrenia and depression dying so early in life?

“I decided that I needed to look into this because it was just happening too frequently.”

Studies Put Soda in the Crosshairs

Sep 22, 2011

All this week, NHPR has been looking at the challenge of reducing the number of overweight people in the state.

At the national level, there is the barest glimmer of good news.  One study suggests that obesity rates among some groups might be leveling off.

A separate analysis  found that the consumption of certain sugars in our diet dropped about 25%

Taken together, the two results have drawn even more attention to one of the most common American habits – drinking sweetened soda, teas, and fruit drinks.

Popularity Widens for Apps to Make Us Skinny

Sep 21, 2011

John Rymes stands at the counter at BagelWorks in Concord, pondering what to eat for lunch.

 It’s not a simple decision.

 “I kinda have to look to see what I’ve burnt today. If I look at my diary, it’s only like 300 calories so I have to probably be a bit careful,” he says. “I have 1200 calories remaining for the day."

Rymes shows off his iPhone, on which he’s pulled up his favorite program -- a weight loss app called MyFitnessPal.

Being fit, though, is not his issue. He’s a triathlete – one of the best in the world at the half Ironman.

School Lunch Goes Gourmet

Sep 20, 2011

Next September, school lunch will be transformed. According to new federal rules, schools will have to serve more fresh fruits and vegetables and less processed, high-fat food.

But beans and broccoli are the bane of many kids’ existence. So the question looms: how do you get kids to eat the stuff?

As NHPR’s Elaine Grant reports, Souhegan High School in Amherst may have found the answer.

His name is Chef Jim.

Click on the counties for statistics.

For Teen, Loneliness, Weight Go Together

Sep 19, 2011

This week, NHPR looks at the challenge of trimming the waistlines of Granite Staters. Our collective habit of taking in more calories than we burn off has been called the country’s biggest self-inflicted wound to our health.

We begin the series with the story of a college student who, as a child, saw his weight growing and growing. Unlike the majority of young adults, he worked his way back to being more healthy and fit.

As NHPR’s Elaine Grant reports, what he went through – and what he learned – is useful for us all.

 

Sources: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services Division of Public Health Services. Obesity Prevention Program. New Hampshire Obesity Data Book 2010

Challenges of Autism

Nov 12, 2010

NHPR correspondent Sheryl Rich-Kern is completing a weeklong series on autism. We'll look at what we've learned about autism and what it means for schools, families and towns.

Guests

Mackenzie is a young adult with autism. She is finishing her senior year at Pelham High School and plans to attend college next year. She is also an artist and is considering pursuing a career as a teacher. She and her mother, Deborah, talk with NHPR's Sheryl Rich Kern, addressing the following questions:

Explain how you worked with a counselor at UNH? What steps do you take? What are your expectations?

Mackenzie - what do you see yourself doing after college?

Under federal law, students with disabilities are entitled to a free and appropriate education. That means they can receive the supports they need up until they turn 21.

After that, many of these young adults aren’t ready to live on their own, find jobs or go on to college.

NHPR correspondent Sheryl Rich Kern has the story as part of her series, Challenges of Autism.

Mackenzie Trippier is talking to her parents about going to Greece with the seniors at Pelham High.

Mackenzie is a young adult with autism. She is finishing her senior year at Pelham High School and plans to attend college next year. She is also an artist and is considering pursuing a career as a teacher. She and her mother, Deborah, talk with NHPR's Sheryl Rich Kern, addressing the following questions:

What prompted you to have Mackenzie evaluated? When did you receive a diagnosis? What was your reaction?

Mackenzie - Were you aware you were different?

Ministère Travail Solidarité Fonction Publique via Flickr/Creative Commons

This week, NHPR correspondent Sheryl Rich Kern has been looking into the challenges schools face when teaching children with autism.

The parents obviously face challenges too. Providing the therapy some children need costs a lot of money and time. But come January 1st, relief is on the way. 

In our week-long series Challenges of Autism, NHPR correspondent Sheryl Rich Kern looks into the new legislation.

The standard treatment for autism when kids are young is something called applied behavior analysis or ABA.

Kirsten Murphy is the administrative director of the New Hampshire Council on Autism Spectrum Disorders. She was a key advocate behind the passage of Connor’s Law, a mandate that goes into effective January 1, 2011. The new law will require health insurance companies to cover therapies for children with autism. Murphy is also the mother of two teenage boys diagnosed with autism. She talks with NHPR's Sheryl Rich Kern to answer the following questions:

Who are the families that were depending on Connor’s Law the most and how will they benefit?

These days it’s not rare to find a child with severe autism actively participating in a public school. A generation ago, parents would have sent those kids to a private school or maybe institutionalized them.

But studies show kids with autism improve in a regular public school. There they are able to socialize and learn how to communicate better because they’re copying the other children.

But not everyone agrees this approach is good for all students.

If it seems like you’re hearing a lot about autism these days, it’s likely because more kids are being diagnosed with it.

Nationally the rate of children diagnosed with what’s called autism spectrum disorder is 1 in 100. For boys, it’s 1 in 70. To put that number into perspective, it means that one student in 3 or 4 average sized school classes lives with some form of autism.

How schools should deal with it is up for debate.

NHPR Correspondent Sheryl Rich-Kern has this second part in her series Challenges of Autism.

Parents across the board would probably agree that becoming a parent is a lesson in managing chaos and tolerance. And research shows that parents raising a child with autism experience higher stress levels than parents of children with other disabilities.

But some parents of children with autism say their child’s diagnosis has enriched their lives in ways
they never would have imagined.

Dr. Jorgensen is a project director with the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire and is an assistant research professor in the UNH Education Department. She works with public school teachers, parents and administrators to help them include more students with disabilities in general education classes. She is the author of several books on inclusion education, including The Inclusion Facilitator’s Guide. She talks with NHPR's Sheryl Rich Kern and answers the following questions:

If your child attends public school, chances are they have a classmate who has difficulty speaking, behaves a little differently,  or just doesn’t seem to  socialize well.

A generation ago, we might have called these kids quirky, and that would have been the end of it. But today, an alarming number of these kids are being diagnosed with what’s called autism spectrum disorder.

A decade ago, the prevalence was one in 250. Today, it’s closer to one in a hundred. We still don’t know the causes of autism, and so there’s little hope of a cure.

A decade ago, the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder was one in 250. Today, it’s closer to one in a hundred. In this weeklong series, NHPR correspondent Sheryl Rich-Kern looks at the impact of autism on families, schools and towns in New Hampshire.

Challenges of Autism is brought to you in part by the Endowment for Health.

Series Stories:

Dr. Stephen Mott is Medical Director of the Child Development Program at the Children's Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. He is a pediatric neurologist who specializes in autism, communication disorders and ADHD. He talks with NHPR's Sheryl Rich Kern to answer the following questions:

What is autism? How is it diagnosed?

Are environmental factors responsible for triggering the disorder? What about vaccines?

How can diets affect children with autism? What about vitamins and other supplements?

Curtis Glover is a young adult with autism. He is finishing his senior year at Merrimack High School while also attending Nashua Community College. Curtis is a public speaker who discusses his experience as a person with autism. He and his mother, Sandi, talk with NHPR's Sheryl Rich Kern and answer the following questions:

What was it like for you as a young child? How did you develop social skills in middle school?

Can you see yourself living on your own?

Ari Ne’eman is a college student diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome. He is the founder of the Autism Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN), which works to improve the public perception of autism. Ne'eman believes that autism is a different way of being and not a disease that should be cured. He talks with NHPR's Sheryl Rich Kern, and answers the following questions:

You were diagnosed at age 12. Had you always felt you were different? How did you learn about your autism and how did learning about the diagnosis affect you?

Ari Ne’eman is a college student diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome. He is the founder of the Autism Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN), which works to improve the public perception of autism. Ne'eman believes that autism is a different way of being and not a disease that should be cured. He talks with NHPR's Sheryl Rich Kern, and answers the following questions:

If there was a pill to make you not autistic, would you take it?

What does the term “neurodiversity” mean?

Hailing Heritage Poultry in New Hampshire

May 21, 2010

All this week, during our Food series, we've been using terms like organic, localvore, and sustainability.
But a couple of poultry farmers in Barrington want to add another word to the mix.
They want people to talk about Heritage....specifically heritage fowl.
It's part of their campaign to ween Americans from poultry factories and get them back to eating the eggs and meat our grandparents would recognize.
NHPR's Keith Shields brings you this last story in our series, Eating-In

Working It Out Live: Food and the Economy

May 21, 2010

The recession took a big bite out of the household food budget. How did the lean times change us? This hour on Working It Out Live, we follow the chain of food through this economy. We’ll be hearing about how families changed how and where they shop.

How Do You Like Them Apples?

May 21, 2010

All this week NHPR has been taking you to dinner.

Today, we move on to dessert… on our plate, apple pie.

The apple is one of the most common fruits.

As part of our series, “Eating In” NHPR’s Amy Quinton looks at the path an apple takes to get to your plate.

The apple has been around a long time…just think of Adam and Eve… and would we have so many adages about it?… “An apple doesn’t fall far from the tree…one bad apple spoils the whole bunch…an apple a day…” you get the picture.

Food Safety

May 21, 2010

Recent food scares from lettuce, spinach and peanut butter show that we are far away from keeping out food safe. We’ll look at the issue of food safety, what’s being done in New Hampshire and the debate over making standards even tougher.

Guests

Maybe it’s all the knives, or the blood. But there’s something a little eerie about a slaughterhouse on wheels.

If you raise chickens, or lamb, or hunt deer for food, you might need the service of a good roving butcher. Like Ray Garcia of Cabin View Farms in Littleton. Solo, he can process about 200 chickens a day in a home built rolling abattoir:

It’s a Wells Fargo Trailer. We have stainless steel tables, stainless steel sinks. If it wasn’t for a lot of the custom facilities throughout New Hampshire, a lot of people wouldn’t be raising things.

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