Higher Education

Courtesy of SNHU

Two years ago, Southern New Hampshire University began a new program, offering college degrees to refugees in Rwanda. Now, after graduating its first class last month, the school is expanding the program from one refugee camp to five.

Keene State College

The president of Keene State College is stepping down after four years in that role.

Anne Huot said her departure was for "personal and professional reasons." She will spend the next year on unpaid leave before returning to a faculty position in biology at the college.

Huot saw Keene State through a number of challenges including the pumpkin festival riots in 2014 and a unionization vote by college employees last year.

She will officially leave her position July 31st.

Daniel Webster College in Nashua has closed its doors for good.

The college held its final graduation ceremony earlier this month, as remaining students now transition to Southern New Hampshire University.

The college was once known for its flight program, but had a tumultuous final few years after being sold to the for-profit ITT Educational Services in 2009.

After a federal crackdown on student aid to for-profit colleges, ITT announced last year it was shutting down its campuses nationwide, leaving Daniel Webster College’s future up in the air.

plymouth.edu

A new scholarship program at Plymouth State University will focus on reaching students in the North Country.

A now-deceased descendant of one of the school’s original funders donated $1.5 million to the university. The gift provides for a scholarship fund that will help up to 20 students with financial need each year. Priority will be given to students from Coos, Grafton, and Carroll Counties.

Paula Lee Hobson with Plymouth State says the donor, Ann Haggart, had a special connection with the North Country.

About 1,000 New Hampshire students who apply to Keene State College and Plymouth State University are not offered admission — and now, those two institutions are offering them alternative pathways through future enrollment.

The Public Promise initiative provides paths including associate degree programs, Dual Admission options and targeted coursework. Once completed, the options would allow students to transfer into the institution of their choice.

Public Promise will start in May with outreach to applicants wanting to attend college in fall 2017.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

Among the dozens of agencies and groups watching the state budget process this spring are the two organizations representing public higher education in New Hampshire: the University System, and the Community College System. In recent years, the two have fared differently when it comes to state support.

unh.edu

The New Hampshire College and University Council has named prominent Democratic political operative Mike Vlacich as its new president.

Vlacich is best known in New Hampshire political circles as an advisor to the state’s most successful Democratic officeholders. He’s worked for John Lynch, Jeanne Shaheen, and Maggie Hassan.

Last year, he was state director for the Hillary Clinton campaign.

His new role at the College and University Council will begin in June when current president Tom Horgan is set to retire.

CREDIT MIKE ROSS, UNH

Officials with the state University System are registering their disappointment with Governor Chris Sununu’s proposal not to increase state funding for New Hampshire’s public universities.

The University System of New Hampshire requested an increase of about 12 million dollars over the next two fiscal years. They said the increase would allow them to keep tuition flat for in-state students.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College and the town of Hanover are in a stand-off over a new $18 million athletic facility the college wants to build.

Last month, the Hanover Planning Board denied Dartmouth a permit for the proposed 70,000 square foot building. The structure would house training facilities for student-athletes to practice their sports during the winter.

The decision was a victory for neighbors who oppose the project for its size and proximity to a residential area.

josh rogers/nhpr

What Plymouth State University is calling the The Raymond S. Burton ’62 Open Laboratory  is a computer-enhanced meeting and study space.

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

Amid uncertainty about the future of the country’s immigration laws under a Trump administration, Dartmouth is trying to reassure undocumented students that they’re welcome on campus — and that the school will try to protect them from potential changes in the law that might be in store.

CREDIT MIKE ROSS, UNH

Officials with the University System of New Hampshire say they hope to freeze in-state tuition for the 2018 and 2019 academic years.

That’s if state budget writers approve the university system’s spending request: $88.5 million in 2018 and $93.5 million in 2019. That's a roughly $20 million increase from what state budget writers gave the system in the current state spending plan.

 

A federal grant of nearly $1.7 million is going to help low-income students in New Hampshire go to college.

It's the first time New Hampshire has received funding through the Department of Education's Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs.

It will support 500 seventh-grade students at middle schools in Berlin, Claremont, Franklin and Laconia, as well as the Lisbon Regional School, Stewartstown Community School and Whitefield Elementary School.

Mike Ross, UNH

The University of New Hampshire is waiving its fifty dollar application fee for all in-state undergraduate applicants this year.

Last year, UNH had a record number of total applicants – over 20,000. But less than 25 percent of those were New Hampshire residents. The number of in-state applicants is down from five years ago.

Victoria Dutcher, head of enrollment management at UNH, hopes waiving the fees for in-state applicants will help change that.

Trigger Warnings, Born In Between, & Miranda July

Sep 9, 2016
Thomas Hawk via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/dSuxV1

Demanding trigger warnings? Canceling speakers? Shutting down comedians? College students today make the political correctness of the past seem tame. Today, is oversensitivity ruining education? We’ll also look at the roots of extreme protectiveness in a nation where police officers are stationed at more and more high schools…a story about what happens when school discipline meets law enforcement. And while the trans-gender movement gains ground, we’ll explore the shockingly common occurrence of doctors assigning gender to intersex babies. 

www.lbpa.com

With its parent company shutting down, the future of Daniel Webster College is uncertain.

ITT Educational Services purchased the Nashua college in 2009. The chain of for-profit colleges announced this week its more than 130 technical institutes across the country would close immediately.

Going to College Without Going Deep Into Debt

Aug 24, 2016
romanboed / flickr/cc

As the annual trek back to campus begins, we examine the options available to cover those hefty tuition bills, including new types of loans, grants and new tools for repayment.  We discuss how families navigate the landscape of funding options and government forms.  And we take a look at whether families are having that kitchen-table conversation about the high cost of higher education earlier in the college search process.


File Photo

The board of New Hampshire’s Community College System announced today it will freeze tuition for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Tuition for a full-time, in-state student will remain at just over $6000 a year.

This marks the fifth consecutive year without an increase in tuition.

Faculty at Plymouth State University voted this week to form a union.

By a margin of about 60 percent to 40 percent, the tenure and tenure-tracked faculty at the school voted to organize with the American Association of University Professors.

NHPR

In his annual address, Huddleston celebrated UNH's one hundred and fiftieth birthday this year, and declared that the state's flagship institution is thriving, with a growing student body, new degree programs, and robust private donations.  Still, challenges remain, including uncertain state funding and staggering student debt.

Sara Plourde, NHPR

Neither Morgan Brady nor Danielle Martin has made it to one of the dozens of political events hosted at their school, Saint Anselm College, in the last year.

“We’re nursing students,” Martin explained, somewhat apologetically. “So we spend a lot of time in the labs. We don’t see much sunlight.”

Still, that doesn’t mean they haven’t felt the primary’s near omnipresence on their campus.

College Applications & Admissions: What's New

Dec 23, 2015
Flickr/CC

It’s crunch time for many High School seniors putting finishing touches on essays and collecting recommendations in hope of landing that acceptance letter come spring. Colleges, meanwhile, are preparing to sort through those materials, as they re-consider the whole process: what really matters and what doesn't.

GUESTS:

After Bernie Sanders announced his proposal to make college free, college affordability has been front and center in the Democratic primary. When it comes to broad goals, the candidates agree. But as for the best way to get there, that’s where they differ.

Lehigh University / Flickr/CC

Over the last decade, high schools and universities have adopted programs encouraging female students to pursue degrees in science, technology, engineering and math, and there’s been a lot of talk about closing the gap.  But now, this divide is changing, with women dominating in some stem fields and men in others.  We’re getting the latest picture.

Guests:

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

Dartmouth College is beginning its transition to a new residential model designed to provide students with more continuity when living on campus and greater interaction with faculty beyond the classroom. The move to a residential college system was among the changes President Philip Hanlon announced in January to address problems such as high-risk drinking, sexual assault and a lack of inclusion.

File Photo

Students who graduate from Great Bay Community College with an Associates’ Degree can now transfer up to 63 credits toward their bachelor’s degree at the University of New England, in Biddeford, Maine.

The partnership was initiated by Great Bay, after administrators noticed an increasing number of students transferring to UNE’s Physicians’ Assistant track, which ultimately graduates students with a masters’ degree.

Now, the new transfer agreement includes more than 20 programs at UNE, including in oceanography and elementary education.

Alexander Sun / Flickr/CC

College Scorecard (9:00):

Two years ago, President Obama announced plans for rating colleges and universities, so students would know whether they were getting a good value.  Now, the administration has released its College Scorecard, and students and families are deciding how best to use it.

Paul Townsend via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/vyKPHC

Harvard, like other prestigious Ivy League schools, is a non-profit. Still, its 36-billion dollar endowment is bigger than the GDP of Jamaica. So why does it remain tax free? Then - meditation, sitting, mindfulness: whatever you call it, it’s springing up everywhere, from Google’s corporate offices to high school classrooms in the Bronx. But can techniques developed to help hospital patients really improve the lives of low-income students? We find out why mindfulness has a place in the classroom. Plus, music industry insiders clamor to predict and announce the summer’s most popular hit – but what about the song of the fall?  We’ll discuss the qualities that make up a classic autumnal anthem. 

Light Brigading via flickr CC / flic.kr/p/kPKiL6

Harvard, like other prestigious Ivy League schools, is a non-profit. Still, its 36-billion dollar endowment is bigger than the GDP of Jamaica. Plus, a poll finds that forty-four percent of families in low-income, low-education households with a high school athlete think their kid has a chance at the majors – we’ll hear about the myth of pro sports as viable career option.  And look into the secretive underworld of illegally modified softball bats.

rick kloeppel via Flickr CC

NEW LONDON, N.H. (AP) — Colby-Sawyer President Thomas Galligan Jr. says he will step down after 10 years in office when his second term ends in 2016.

He made the announcement at a Sept. 1 meeting for faculty and staff.

Galligan, who says he has no plans yet, was dean and a professor of law at the University of Tennessee College of Law when the Colby-Sawyer Board of Trustees picked him to be the private college's eighth president in 2006.

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