Hillary Clinton

Donald Trump often questions whether Hillary Clinton is honest or trustworthy enough to be president. This week, he took up another line of attack: that Clinton is in failing health.

Claims about Clinton's health have circulated for years but have gained new traction recently, in part thanks to a comment by Trump and questions raised by Fox News host Sean Hannity.

Donald Trump's missteps since the conventions have put Hillary Clinton in a dominant position.

If the election were held today, according to the latest NPR analysis of polling, demographics and on-the-ground reporting, Clinton would win in a landslide of 2008 proportions. She has solidified her leads in key battleground states and crosses the threshold of 270 electoral votes needed to win the White House in the NPR Battleground Map with just states where she already has a significant lead.

josh rogers/nhpr

You can verify that New Hampshire is a presidential battleground by the campaign schedules of both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. You can also see in in the attention Granite Staters are getting from vice presidential candidates.

When vice presidential candidates work the campaign trail, the goals tend to be straightforward: rally loyalists, raise money, attack the opposing party's nominee -- and avoid gaffes. By that standard, consider Senator Tim Kaine’s two days in New Hampshire a success.

AP Photo / Evan Vucci

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump used a speech in Windham last night to criticize his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton.

Speaking to a crowd of several hundred supporters in a gymnasium at Windham High School, Trump went on the offensive, using a line of attack usually employed by Hillary Clinton against him.

“So ‘unstable Hillary’ she lacks the judgement, temperament and moral character to lead this country. She is a dangerous liar – her greatest achievement is that.”

Kate Harper for NHPR

A new WBUR poll of New Hampshire voters shows that Democrat Hillary Clinton has a commanding lead over her Republican rival Donald Trump in this year’s general election. The poll also has good news for Democrat Maggie Hassan’s bid to unseat Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte. Steve Koczela joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to dissect the results of the poll. Koczela is president of MassINC Polling Group, which conducted the WBUR survey.

Now here's a political endorsement you might not expect.

Hillary Clinton is the candidate who set up a private email server and was — in the words of the director of the FBI — "extremely careless" in how she handled classified information.

And her campaign and the Democratic Party just got hacked. Yet, prominent leaders in the cybersecurity industry are coming out in favor of Clinton for president.

The scene is something you just can't make up.

Mary RN / Morguefile

Astrid Silva came to the United States as an undocumented Mexican immigrant and she spoke last night at the Democratic Convention in favor of Hillary Clinton. She said, “I know she will fight to keep our families together. Nuestras familias. I know she will.”

Joining NHPR’s Peter Biello today to discuss issues of immigration in New Hampshire is Alejandro Urrutia, a doctor originally from Mexico.

Amid furor over an email leak that revealed a bias against Bernie Sanders inside the Democratic National Committee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she will step down as chair.

Wasserman Schultz will still open and close the convention, she said in a statement, and "address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats, but for all Americans."

A Keene woman will speak at the opening day of the Democratic National Convention next week.

Pam Livengood is one of the “everyday Americans” set to speak in Philadelphia, according to a schedule released by the Democratic National Committee.

Livengood opened up at Hillary Clinton’s first campaign stop in New Hampshire last year about how she and her husband are taking care of their grandson because his mother is battling drug addiction.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders made it official today in Portsmouth: He endorsed Hillary Clinton for president. Sanders joined Clinton on stage and told a huge crowd filled with still- passionate backers of his own presidential run that he will do all he can to make sure Clinton makes it to the White House.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

"On the Political Front" is our occasional check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

AP Photo/David Goldman

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders will join Democratic rival Hillary Clinton for a campaign event in Portsmouth Tuesday, Clinton's campaign announced Monday morning.

Speculation is Sanders will formally offer his endorsement of the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, though there’s been no official confirmation of that yet.

Donald Trump on Friday morning condemned the shootings of Dallas law enforcement officers Thursday night as well as the deaths of two black men who were killed by police in the previous days.

In light of the events, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee also canceled his expected trip to Miami, where he had reportedly planned to meet with Hispanic leaders.

In his first response to the shootings this week, Trump called for restoring "law and order" and "confidence of our people to be safe and secure in their homes and on the street."

Bernie Sanders is expected to endorse Hillary Clinton on Tuesday at an event in New Hampshire, a Democratic source with knowledge of discussions between the two campaigns tell NPR's Tamara Keith.

Clinton secured enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination just over a month ago, but Sanders has stayed in the campaign — though he kept a lower profile.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

 

Hillary Clinton will return to New Hampshire next Tuesday, her campaign confirmed this afternoon. It will be her first visit back to the Granite State since the presidential primary.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire Republican U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte says the FBI's recommendation that Hillary Clinton not be prosecuted for her use of a private email server "suggests that she gets to play by a different set of rules than everyone else."

Ayotte commented Tuesday after agency Director James Comey said announced the decision, but called Clinton's actions as former secretary of state "extremely careless" and faulted her agency for a lackadaisical approach to handling classified material.

The long-running drama over Hillary Clinton's use of a personal email server during her time as secretary of state came to some resolution today as FBI Director James Comey announced that while Clinton was "extremely careless" in handling classified information, she should not face charges.

Hillary Clinton laid out her economic plan on Monday at a rally in Cincinnati. She appeared with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a hero to progressives who has stood up to bank executives and called for lower student debt.

NPR's politics team has annotated Clinton's portion of the speech below. Portions we commented on are in boldface, followed by analysis and fact check in italics.

The speech follows:

There was a time when it wasn't even clear Sen. Elizabeth Warren would endorse Hillary Clinton. That time has passed.

As they took the stage together Monday in Cincinnati, the two politicians locked arms, waved (the old half hug-half wave move) and smiled widely. Warren is among the names buzzed about as a possible pick for vice president on a Clinton ticket. Any questions about chemistry were answered today.

Bernie Sanders said he'll vote for Hillary Clinton in November — but more than two weeks after she became the presumptive Democratic nominee, Sanders remains in the race.

Sanders was on MSNBC when Nicolle Wallace, a former Republican aide and now network political analyst, asked Sanders, "Are you going to vote for Hillary Clinton in November?"

His answer: "Yes."

He added, "The issue right here is, I think I am going to do everything I can to defeat Donald Trump."

Hillary Clinton delivered a stinging indictment Tuesday of both Donald Trump's business record and his economic policy prescriptions, an early effort to undermine what the business mogul has billed as one of his chief qualifications for the White House.

"We can't let him bankrupt America like we are one of his failed casinos," Clinton told supporters at an alternative high school in Columbus, Ohio. "We can't let him roll the dice with our children's futures."

Earlier this year, we noticed a pattern in which states were voting for Hillary Clinton and which were voting for Bernie Sanders in the Democratic nominating contests. Sanders tended to win the states that had the highest income equality (as measured by the Gini index, a widely used measure of inequality), and Clinton tended to win states that were the most unequal.

Allegra Boverman/NHPR

Back in February, New Hampshire handed Sen. Bernie Sanders his first victory in pursuit of the presidency. Four months later, with Hillary Clinton poised to earn the Democratic nomination, where does that leave the more than 151,000 Granite Staters who backed her opponent?

Well, it depends.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has endorsed presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Warren, a hero of progressive Democrats, is the latest party leader to fall in line behind Clinton after she clinched the requisite number of delegates earlier this week over rival Bernie Sanders.

The primary season isn't quite wrapped yet (six states hold Democratic contests Tuesday), but Hillary Clinton has now secured the number of delegates needed (2,383) to become the Democratic Party's presumptive nominee.

Speaking Monday night, Clinton said, "according to the news, we are on the brink of a historic, historic, unprecedented moment. But we still have work to do, don't we?"

Hillary Clinton won today's Democratic primary in Puerto Rico, according to the Associated Press.

With about a quarter of precincts reporting, Clinton had about two-thirds of the vote. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders had about one-third.

About three months after the primary and two months ahead of the Democratic National Convention, Bernie Sanders has picked up his first New Hampshire superdelegate — Martha Fuller Clark, a state senator from Portsmouth and the vice chair of the state party.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

The once-polite democratic presidential races has turned bitter. Sanders's supporters are increasingly agitated about the nomination process, while Clinton's campaign says the numbers strongly favor her and it's time to unify. And some activists want the DNC chair to resign, while others say all this just helps Donald Trump.


Hillary Clinton would have a significant electoral advantage over Donald Trump in the general election, based on an NPR analysis.

The Democratic former secretary of state would start out with already exactly enough electoral votes to win the presidency, 270-191, based on states considered safe, likely and to lean toward either candidate. The ratings, which will be updated at least monthly until Election Day, are based on fundamentals — historical trends and demographics, plus reporting and polling (both public and private).

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

In this tumultuous election, delegate math has a source of contention, with some calling the process rigged and many Americans scratching their heads about how much their votes matter.  And while the Indiana primary may have quelled some uncertainty for the GOP, questions remain. Meanwhile, on the Democratic side, the delegate hunt continues.

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