Hillary Clinton

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: December 8, 2017

Dec 8, 2017

New Hampshire becomes the first state to opt out of FirstNet, a federal program designed to help first responders better communicate across the country.  Hillary Clinton returns to New Hampshire to sign copies of her book, and attracts protests and ponies as well as fans.  Eversource prepares to switch on its first major new power line in New Hampshire in 20 years.  And the Rockingham County attorney’s office releases more than 900 pages of the state’s investigation into Phillips Exeter Academy. 

PAIGE SUTHERLAND/NHPR

Hundreds of Hillary Clinton supporters lined up for hours Tuesday outside Gibson’s Bookstore in Concord to get signed copies of Clinton’s new book.

AP/Jim Cole/Pool

Democratic political giant Mary Louise Hancock has died at 97.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Lawyers for a New Hampshire city sued by a performance artist and perennial candidate in the state's presidential primary believe a settlement is imminent on a request by the artist for a permit to bring two ponies to his planned protest of Hillary Clinton's book signing.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Hillary Clinton is back in New Hampshire on Tuesday.

The former Democratic Presidential candidate and Secretary of State will be in downtown Concord signing copies of her new book.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

Hillary Clinton is returning to New Hampshire to sign copies of her new book, "What Happened."

The former Democratic presidential nominee will be at Gibson's bookstore in Concord on Dec. 5. Tickets to the event cost $30 and include one copy of the book. They go on sale Sept. 5.

Clinton lost the 2016 Democratic primary in New Hampshire to Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, but the state picked her over Donald Trump in the general election.

Jonathan Taylor via Flickr CC

New Hampshire’s members of the Electoral College are requesting an intelligence briefing on Russia’s alleged involvement in the U.S. presidential election.

In a letter to James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence, the electors say they should be provided more details on the scope of investigations into Russian government interference in support of Donald Trump before their scheduled vote on December 19th.  

Clinton Makes Her Closing Argument To New Hampshire

Nov 7, 2016
Meredith Nierman | WGBH News

Hillary Clinton was in New Hampshire on Sunday night making her closing argument to voters here. 

The musician James Taylor warmed up the crowd Sunday night at the Manchester Radisson Hotel—one ballroom and two overflow rooms of Clinton supporters taking one last moment to bask in their candidate before Tuesday.

Hannah McCarthy

Chelsea Clinton is campaigning for her mother, Hillary Clinton, in New Hampshire on Friday. She'll make stops at Keene State and Dartmouth College, just the latest in a series of college campus visits for the Clinton campaign in the state.

The youth could mean a boost for Clinton in the New Hampshire polls -- but only if college-aged voters bother to cast their ballot. 

Michael Brindley

The presidential campaign is usually an opportunity every four years for students to study democracy in real time. But, by all accounts, this campaign has been anything but normal.

The adult themes and harsh rhetoric have been especially challenging for educators, who’ve had to figure out how to address these subjects in the classroom.

NHPR Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spoke with educators across New Hampshire to see what’s different about teaching the presidential campaign this year.

Jason Moon for NHPR

With just days remaining before voters head to the polls, both presidential campaigns are sprinting to the finish line in New Hampshire. And, perhaps not surprisingly, each camp feels it has the winning strategy to get out the vote. But what does that look like on the ground?

FBI Director James Comey's letter to Congress reporting a renewed look into emails that could be related to Hilary Clinton's private server rocked the presidential race on Friday.

The Clinton campaign and supporters have jumped on Comey for making such a dramatic announcement so close to an election. The question being raised now is whether the timing and style of the announcement make it illegal.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Top Democrats in the state gathered in Manchester this weekend to get fired up for the election’s  homestretch.

At Saturday's inaugural Kennedy-Clinton Dinner, speakers included candidates for major office, with special guest Chelsea Clinton.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

New Hampshire Democrats presented a united front Monday at a rally with Hillary Clinton in Manchester.

But  it wasn’t just Clinton these politicians were urging voters to get behind but the whole Democratic ticket.

AP

 

Hillary Clinton is returning to New Hampshire campaign stop with just about two weeks to go until Election Day.

The Democratic presidential nominee will campaign in Manchester on Monday alongside Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren. This is Clinton's third trip to New Hampshire since July. Clinton campaigned alongside former rival Bernie Sanders in both of her previous trips, reflecting her attempts to reach out to the supporters who propelled Sanders to a win in the February primary.

Clinton and Warren are hosting a 12:30 p.m. rally at Saint Anselm College.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out.

He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon.

He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate tonight at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors. 

Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Wednesday night is the third and final presidential debate, and marks the last chance for Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to make their case to voters on a national stage.

Kathy Sullivan of Manchester is a member of Democratic National Committee.

She joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the debate.

Let's make one thing clear: Three weeks out from this election, Hillary Clinton is winning — and it's not close.

Yes, people still have to vote, but if Democratic groups come out — and the Trump scorched-earth campaign is more like a white flag than an actual strategy — Hillary Clinton will be the next president of the United States unless something drastic changes between now and Election Day.

The month of October has been about as bad as could be for Trump. Let's recap. There was:

- The leaked audio of Trump's comments bragging about kissing and groping women,

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Former President Bill Clinton campaigned for his wife Hillary in New Hampshire on Monday. At his first stop at Dartmouth College, he stressed that America’s future remains bright.

josh rogers/nhpr

 

Town hall political events are dear to New Hampshire but not to Donald Trump, who built his campaign on huge rallies. And there were early signs Thursday night that Trump’s event in Sandown never aspired to be a true town hall.  

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders will campaign for his former rival Hillary Clinton Friday at two New Hampshire colleges.

Sanders is hoping to sway young voters to the Democratic presidential nominee, an area where polls show Clinton continues to struggle in her race with Republican Donald Trump.

Sanders will campaign for Clinton at Keene State College and Nashua Community College on Friday. 

This comes a week after Sanders joined Clinton for an event at the University of New Hampshire.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Following their first debate Monday, Hillary Clinton has a 7-point lead over Donald Trump in New Hampshire according to a poll released Friday by WBUR.

The poll conducted Sept. 27-29 found 42 percent of likely voters supporting the Democratic presidential nominee, and 35 percent backing her Republican opponent. Thirteen percent of voters said they support Libertarian Gary Johnson.

The poll surveyed 502 likely voters and has a margin of error of 4.4 percentage points.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Donald Trump returned to New Hampshire Thursday for a rally in Bedford, where he took aim at Hillary and former President Bill Clinton.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump squared off for their first presidential debate Monday night at Hofstra University in New York. Here in NH, the debate attracted crowds for watch parties for each candidate.

NHPR’s reporter Paige Sutherland stopped by a couple of them.

AP

Following their first debate Monday night, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump are bringing their presidential campaigns to the battleground state of New Hampshire.

Clinton will be in the state Wednesday, when she will campaign with former Democratic rival, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.

The two are set to appear together at an event at the University of New Hampshire, where they will discuss college affordability.

Trump is set to campaign here the following day, rallying with supporters at an event in Bedford on Thursday.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate Monday night. The NPR Politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is following along and will be annotating and fact-checking in real time.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

 

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders are scheduled to talk about student debt and college affordability in New Hampshire.

The two are expected to campaign Wednesday at the Field House at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.

Clinton's campaign says she and Sanders will talk about how student debt should not hold Americans back after graduation. They also plan to discuss free in-state college educations for qualified families.

At a candidate forum Wednesday night, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump explained their policies on ground troops, fighting ISIS and other issues related to the military. We've recapped five key moments here and more deeply examined two claims, one from each candidate, below.

A forum designed to test the leading presidential candidates' capacity for military leadership Wednesday night displayed as much unpredictability as the rest of this election, as questions and answers veered off-topic and both candidates were put on the defensive several times.

Pages