Hillary Clinton

NHPR file photos

With every day that passes leading up to the New Hampshire primary, the pressure builds on Republican presidential hopefuls looking to make a splash here.


Natasha Haverty

 With less than three weeks to go before the state’s presidential primary, a new poll from UNH shows Bernie Sanders leading with nearly twice as much support as rival Hillary Clinton. Today, former President Bill Clinton showed up to make his case for why that should change. 

Hillary Clinton dismissed a report that emails she sent on her private email server contained a high level of classified material.

Speaking to NPR's Ari Shapiro in San Antonio on Wednesday, the Democratic presidential candidate continued to maintain that she "never sent or received any material marked classified" while at the State Department "and that hasn't changed in all of these months."

Kate Brindley for NHPR

The UNH Survey Center turned plenty of heads this week with its latest poll on the New Hampshire Democratic primary. The poll, conducted for WMUR and CNN, had Bernie Sanders leaping even further ahead of Hillary Clinton, now leading 60 to 33 percent.

The poll did come with a few caveats. 

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joined Morning Edition to talk about Sunday night's Democratic debate and Republican Ted Cruz's big push here in New Hampshire.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

How do you define an attack ad? Is Hillary Clinton attacking Bernie Sanders, in her most recent ad? In it, she declares “It's time to pick a side, either we stand with the gun lobby, or we join the president and stand up to them.”

Kate Brindley for NHPR

 

Bernie Sanders casts himself as the voice of anti-establishment politics. But he's also a 25-year veteran of Congress.

Democratic rival Hillary Clinton is trying to draw attention to Sanders' record on gun control and health care. The strategy aims to point out the rare inconsistencies in his voting record that could clash with the anti-establishment brand he's cultivated during the presidential campaign.

www.unionleader.com

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition most Monday mornings for "On the Political Front."

The New Hampshire Union Leader has been booted as co-sponsor of the lone New Hampshire GOP presidential debate.  The network’s explanation: the Union Leader’s editorials going after GOP frontrunner Donald Trump.

Allegra Boverman

For the first time in its 100 year history, Planned Parenthood has endorsed a candidate in a presidential primary: former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Clinton officially accepted the endorsement yesterday afternoon in Manchester. NHPR’s Natasha Haverty reports.


Brady Carlson / NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is headed back to New Hampshire this weekend.

On Sunday she’ll accept the endorsement of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund at an event in Manchester.

But first, she joins Weekend Edition to talk about the campaign and some of the issues that come up in this state.

Crystal Paradis

Actor and writer Lena Dunham and retired U.S. women’s soccer star Abby Wambach began two days of campaigning for Hillary Clinton on Friday. They join Bill and Chelsea Clinton, Al Franken, and other celebrities crisscrossing the state these days on Clinton’s behalf.

Stuart Isett/Fortune Most Powerful Women via Flickr

 

Chelsea Clinton will hit the campaign trail for her mother next week, marking her debut appearance in the 2016 presidential race.

Clinton, 35, will headline three events in New Hampshire on Tuesday, according to an announcement from the Democratic frontrunner's campaign.

As the only child of Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, Chelsea Clinton remains a political celebrity. Her announcement last month that she is expecting a second child attracted international media attention.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In Nashua Monday, Bill Clinton drew more than 700 people to his first campaign appearance for his wife this primary season. And while the former president remains popular among New Hampshire Democrats, many in the crowd at Nashua Community College said his wife's candidacy rests on her own record.

While Hillary Clinton enjoys wide support in the Democratic presidential race across much of the country, in New Hampshire, Sen. Bernie Sanders still poses a threat. In Portsmouth Tuesday, Clinton spoke to a crowd that included voters weighing both candidates.

Allegra Boverman | Kate Harper

The fight late last week among Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee seems to have simmered down.

The DNC censured Sanders' campaign for improperly getting access to confidential voter data from Clinton's team. The restrictions have since been lifted, but the incident shone a light on a little known, but critical aspect of the 2016 presidential race: how candidates use data to identify, reach and influence potential supporters.

At a Manchester, N.H., watch party following Saturday's Democratic primary debate, Hillary Clinton stood side by side with the man she called her "not so secret weapon" — her husband, former President Bill Clinton. Voters are about to see much more of him, she said.

One of the statement's that got the most attention, and criticism, during Saturday's Democratic presidential debate was Hillary Clinton's assertion that "we now finally are where we need to be" in Syria.

Jeb Bush pounced, along with many others on the right, to call Clinton out on the assertion, given that ISIS still holds a lot of territory in Syria, and given the recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino.

But what's interesting furthermore are the two assertions Clinton made to back up her statement.

The three Democratic presidential candidates will take the stage at Saint Anselm College Saturday night for their next debate.

This will be New Hampshire’s first debate of the primary season.

And while polls show a tight Democratic race here in the Granite State, the numbers nationally tell a different story.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stopped in Salem on Tuesday where she held an event focused on manufacturing jobs.

 

 

In a packed gym at Woodbury School, Clinton unveiled her proposals to boost employment in that sector. They included the creation of a few tax credits; one aimed at communities hit by layoffs, and another geared toward employee training.

 

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Over a presidential campaign season that grows longer every four years, candidates have long counted on voters changing their minds before Primary Day. But we don’t often hear about how or why voters make up their minds in the first place. NHPR followed up with three voters to see how they are forming – and changing—their opinions over the course of the campaign.

flickr/barjack

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition most Monday mornings for "On The Political Front."

NHPR File Photo

Whether measured in polls, crowds or money raised, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton appear in a tight race as New Hampshire's Primary Day approaches.

Clinton, of course, is no stranger to hard-fought Granite State contests. She edged out Barack Obama in New Hampshire’s 2008 Democratic presidential primary, winning 39 percent of the vote to Obama’s 37 percent.   

But the bottom-line vote tallies can obscure a simple fact: The New Hampshire primary is not just a statewide contest. 

Allegra Boverman, NHPR

A group of New Hampshire mayors and mayors-elect rallied around Hillary Clinton’s newly released infrastructure plan Monday, expressing optimism that the Democratic presidential candidate’s proposals will provide a long-awaited boost to local development.

NHPR Staff

 

Hillary Rodham Clinton unveiled the first piece of a new jobs agenda on Sunday, promising hundreds of billions of dollars in fresh federal spending in an effort to compete with the liberal economic policies of her primary challengers.

AP Photo/Cheryl Senter

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition most Monday mornings for "On the Political Front."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Hillary Rodham Clinton says her use of the term "illegal immigrants" was a "poor choice of words" and she's pledging not to use it anymore.

Clinton was asked about her use of the term to describe people who are in the U.S. illegally during a question-and-answer session Tuesday on Facebook held by Telemundo.

During a stop in New Hampshire earlier this month, the Democratic presidential candidate referred to immigrants that way while discussing her support for a barrier along the Mexican border as a New York senator.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Hillary Rodham Clinton outlined steps to improve the Department of Veterans Affairs today, casting herself as a protector against proposals to privatize the sprawling health care system for those who have served in the military.

In a pre-Veterans Day event in New Hampshire, the Democratic presidential candidate said she would seek to improve veterans' health care, modernize veterans' benefits system and address an unwieldy bureaucracy.

Jason Moon / NHPR

For months now presidential candidates have been campaigning in New Hampshire. But to officially enter the race, candidates large and small, Republican and Democrat alike, must pass through the Secretary of State's office. It's a time honored tradition of the New Hampshire primary, but it can lead to some unexpected presidential run-ins. Like yesterday with Jim Gilmore and Hillary Clinton.

It's becoming a monthly tradition — on the last day of the month, the State Department unloads thousands of Hillary Clinton's emails.

While Clinton maintains she never used her personal server to send or receive classified information, between 600 and 700 emails have been classified retroactively since the monthly releases began in May, according to Politico. The latest batch this month includes over 7,000 pages of new documents.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

During a campaign stop at St. Anselm College in Manchester Wednesday, Hillary Clinton weighed in on the death penalty – something she hadn’t yet addressed during the 2016 campaign.

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