History

The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

World War I's 100th Anniversary: N.H. Reflects

Credit kg12345 / Flickr/CC

This summer marks the 100th anniversary of World War I. We’ll take a look at the history lessons of that war, including the causes and the lasting impact of the war.

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Word of Mouth
2:38 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Historical New Hampshire: Cultural Highlights In The Southern Counties

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New Hampshire is often advertised as a state filled with natural attractions, famous for our mountains (Mt. Washington and Mt. Monadnock are both known world-wide), lakes, and rivers. But the state is filled with historical landmarks as well, which Lucie Bryar covers in her book Exploring Southern New Hampshire: History and Nature on Back Roads and Quiet Waters. Here are some of the cultural attractions in southern NH you may not have heard about, but that you’ll definitely want to check out.

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Word of Mouth
1:25 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

7.23.14: N.H.'s Hidden Treasures, Casual Dining Wars, And Gross America

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New Hampshire bills itself as having a terrain for all seasons – the mountains offer climbing and skiing, the forests shelter innumerable hiking trails, and the lakes and rivers draw people in summer and winter alike. We speak with Lucie Bryar about some the state’s best spots for exploring. And, casual dining chains have been experimenting in extreme discounts. We take a look at the logic behind it and speak with one reporter who put these policies to the test. Then, in case you’ve run out of vacation ideas, we have a list of America’s ickiest attractions.

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Word of Mouth
1:00 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

7.22.14: Sex In The Wild, Chuck Klosterman Tackles Villainy, And The First Fireworks

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Today, we have a conversation with an anatomist behind a new PBS series that puts the lens on mammals who reproduce under extreme circumstances, like dolphins. And if you think it’s tough for mammals to find a mate, try finding one in the vast ocean when you’re a nearly microscopic crustacean. We’ll look into the mating rituals of copepods. And then, a different sort of nature when Chuck Klosterman tells us more about the traits of villainy.

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Word of Mouth
2:12 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

7.09.14: Sialkot Soccer Balls, Thoughts for English Teachers, and Keeping Calm

Credit John Cooper via Flickr Creative Commons

High tech can sometimes mean hand stitching. We discuss the production of World Cup soccer balls in Siaklot, Pakistan with Atlantic assistant editor, Joe Pinsker. Next, a conversation about the intricacies of teaching high school English with writer and teacher Nick Ripatrazone. Then, Dr. Jordan Ellenberg takes us through the most unread books of summer using his formula, the Hawking Index. And, we talk to "Joyland" author Emily Schultz about the strange events that followed the release Steven King's book of the same title. Plus, a look into the history of the “Keep Calm and Carry On” poster.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Revisiting The American Revolution: Nathaniel Philbrick's "Bunker Hill"

In a new book, acclaimed historian Nathaniel Philbrick offers the untold back-story to this battle, which he calls the tipping point of the American Revolution.  He introduces us to little-known but vitally important characters in this drama, who did much of the heavy lifting of the Revolution in Boston, while the founding fathers were far from the scene, in Philadelphia.

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Word of Mouth
2:52 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

7.06.14: TV Openers, Lost Histories, And The Truth About Bug Spray

Credit Joel Christian Gill

Whether it’s a catchy theme song, or a single image - think Mary Tyler Moore tossing her cap into the air – some TV credit sequences are etched in our minds. Today we listen for the greatest TV opening sequences of all time. Plus, a look at a graphic novel that reveals the untold stories of African-American history…including that of Richard Potter, for whom the New Hampshire town of Potter Place is named. Then, tis the season for mosquitoes, black flies, and ticks. How are you preventing pesky bites? We sample the rainbow of bug repellant…from witch hazel to DEET.

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Word of Mouth
12:00 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Writers On A New England Stage: Bill Bryson's "One Summer: 1927"

Bill Bryson Photo by David J. Murray, ClearEyePhoto.com

Word of Mouth presents a special rebroadcast of Writers on a New England Stage with Bill Bryson, presented by NHPR and The Music Hall and recorded live at The Music Hall in Portsmouth. He joined Virginia Prescott on stage last October to talk about his book “One Summer: 1927.” It is now available in paperback.

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Word of Mouth
2:41 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

6.18.14: Elevators, Life Once Removed & Abolishing 'Happy Birthday'

Credit Michael Salerno via flickr Creative Commons

Going up? Today on Word of Mouth, we're lifting you to new cultural heights with a look into the history of two architectural advancements in history - the elevator and escalator. We'll hold the door for you when we stop on a story about a family of mannequins. Last stop, a discussion about why we should all stop singing that pervasive birthday song.

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Word of Mouth
1:50 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

6.11.14: Happy Spending, Tinkering Kids, And The Weird History Of Scarecrows

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The old adage goes, “money can’t buy you happiness”, but maybe you’re just not spending it right. From paying for experiences to spending on others, we'll look at the science of smarter, happier spending. Plus, parents prepare! The end of the school year is nigh. For those looking for ways to get kids off their screens and outside this summer, fear not, we have just the activities in mind. Then, the surprisingly fascinating history of the scarecrow.

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Word of Mouth
12:16 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

5. 28. 14: Tacky Museum Gift Shops and Letters Worth Reading

Credit Scott Lynch/ Gothamist

The gift shop at The National September 11 Memorial Museum has sparked controversy for such keepsakes as: a plush FDNY rescue dog and “survivor tree” earrings. While many find the items tasteless, the impulse to commemorate is as old as the country itself. NHPR's Brady Carlson takes us on a historical tour of tone-deaf keepsakes, from toy hand grenades to Confederate flag throw pillows. Plus, we'll speak to the founder of Letters of Note about the beauty and power of handwritten correspondence. 

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Word of Mouth
9:56 am
Thu May 22, 2014

The Bride Wore Black

Milo & Etta Warner, 1901

All Dressed in White - it's the title of author Carol Wallace's look into the history of the American wedding, but it hasn't always held true for brides. On the frontier - a culture centered around migrant work & making do - a woman may only have a single good dress, designed for a decidedly different purpose.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Murder Of Joseph Smith: Alex Beam's "American Crucifixion"

Credit alexbeam.net

We're sitting down with Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam to talk about his new book, "American Crucifixion," examining the life of Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon Church.

GUEST: 

  • Alex Beam – columnist for the Boston Globe and author of several books, most recently “American Crucifixion.”

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Word of Mouth
1:49 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

5.19.14: Civil War Re-enactors, Saving The Wild Apple, and Arsenic In Rice

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In 1986 there were an estimated 50,000 Civil War re-enactors in the U.S. Since 2000 their ranks have been cut in half. Today on Word of Mouth: the decline of Civil War reenactments, and what drives someone to take on the identity of a 19th century solider. Plus, after millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 3000 known varieties of apple. But, are our beloved Galas and Honeycrisps in peril? Why the extinction of wild apple species in central Asia could spell disaster for their descendants. And, when it comes to rice, why brown may not be the healthier.

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Word of Mouth
2:06 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

5.15.14: Figuring Out GDP, Alternative Labor Unions, and Did Neanderthal Parents Love Their Kids?

Credit Ervins Strauhmanis via Flickr Creative Commons

It gets bandied about countless times by economists, politicians, and newscasters, but what exactly is GDP? Today on Word of Mouth, the surprisingly fascinating process of measuring Gross Domestic Product, and what this live or die by economic indicator overlooks. Plus, prehistoric humans are commonly depicted as grunting, club-wielding brutes. Now, evidence that Neanderthal parents didn’t just rear children, but loved and cherished them. All that and more on today's show.

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