History

Word of Mouth
1:50 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

6.11.14: Happy Spending, Tinkering Kids, And The Weird History Of Scarecrows

Credit ninahale via Flickr Creative Commons

The old adage goes, “money can’t buy you happiness”, but maybe you’re just not spending it right. From paying for experiences to spending on others, we'll look at the science of smarter, happier spending. Plus, parents prepare! The end of the school year is nigh. For those looking for ways to get kids off their screens and outside this summer, fear not, we have just the activities in mind. Then, the surprisingly fascinating history of the scarecrow.

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Word of Mouth
12:16 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

5. 28. 14: Tacky Museum Gift Shops and Letters Worth Reading

Credit Scott Lynch/ Gothamist

The gift shop at The National September 11 Memorial Museum has sparked controversy for such keepsakes as: a plush FDNY rescue dog and “survivor tree” earrings. While many find the items tasteless, the impulse to commemorate is as old as the country itself. NHPR's Brady Carlson takes us on a historical tour of tone-deaf keepsakes, from toy hand grenades to Confederate flag throw pillows. Plus, we'll speak to the founder of Letters of Note about the beauty and power of handwritten correspondence. 

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Word of Mouth
9:56 am
Thu May 22, 2014

The Bride Wore Black

Milo & Etta Warner, 1901

All Dressed in White - it's the title of author Carol Wallace's look into the history of the American wedding, but it hasn't always held true for brides. On the frontier - a culture centered around migrant work & making do - a woman may only have a single good dress, designed for a decidedly different purpose.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Murder Of Joseph Smith: Alex Beam's "American Crucifixion"

Credit alexbeam.net

We're sitting down with Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam to talk about his new book, "American Crucifixion," examining the life of Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon Church.

GUEST: 

  • Alex Beam – columnist for the Boston Globe and author of several books, most recently “American Crucifixion.”

LINKS:

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Word of Mouth
1:49 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

5.19.14: Civil War Re-enactors, Saving The Wild Apple, and Arsenic In Rice

Credit WalterPro4755 via Flickr Creative Commons

In 1986 there were an estimated 50,000 Civil War re-enactors in the U.S. Since 2000 their ranks have been cut in half. Today on Word of Mouth: the decline of Civil War reenactments, and what drives someone to take on the identity of a 19th century solider. Plus, after millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 3000 known varieties of apple. But, are our beloved Galas and Honeycrisps in peril? Why the extinction of wild apple species in central Asia could spell disaster for their descendants. And, when it comes to rice, why brown may not be the healthier.

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Word of Mouth
2:06 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

5.15.14: Figuring Out GDP, Alternative Labor Unions, and Did Neanderthal Parents Love Their Kids?

Credit Ervins Strauhmanis via Flickr Creative Commons

It gets bandied about countless times by economists, politicians, and newscasters, but what exactly is GDP? Today on Word of Mouth, the surprisingly fascinating process of measuring Gross Domestic Product, and what this live or die by economic indicator overlooks. Plus, prehistoric humans are commonly depicted as grunting, club-wielding brutes. Now, evidence that Neanderthal parents didn’t just rear children, but loved and cherished them. All that and more on today's show.

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Word of Mouth
1:55 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

5.14.14: The Internet Is Not Killing Religion, Years As Celebrities, And Female Viagra

Credit Unknown, via Wikimedia Commons

Over the past 25 years, the percentage of people with no religious affiliation has more than doubled, at the same time, the internet has been widely embraced. Coincidence? Today on Word of Mouth: does the internet spell the fall of religion? Or is it more of a correlation than a cause? Plus, we peruse the new release section of the bookstore and notice a trend, Catastrophe 1914, 1914: History in an Hour, 1914: Fight the Good Fight. A look into the downside of treating years as celebrities.

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The Exchange
5:40 am
Mon May 12, 2014

America's Bitter Debate Leading Up To WWII: Lynne Olson's "Those Angry Days"

Credit lynneolsen.com

We're sitting down with Lynne Olson, author of new book "Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America’s Fight Over World War II, 1939-1945." We'll discuss the bitter debate leading up American involvement in World War Two, a critical time in U.S. History.

GUEST:

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Kurk Dorsey's "Whales & Nations"

Credit Univ of Washington Press

The new book "Whales and Nations" by UNH professor Kurkpatrick Dorsey explores the history of international conservation efforts through the lens of the commercial whaling industry. We’ll talk with him about the whaling in the 20th century and why international diplomacy failed to regulate commercial whaling.

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Word of Mouth
1:12 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

3.6.14: Daylight Saving Time, Marissa Nadler, Revolving Doors, Wood & Animal Tracking

Credit Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth wishes you a happy Daylight Saving Time! (Can you believe it's this Sunday already?) But why exactly does the practice of changing our clocks even exist? We explore the ins and outs of Daylight Saving (without the extra "s") with a guest who wrote the book on it. Then Zach Nugent talks with Marissa Nadler whose most recent album was released in early February. We take an architectural turn with a look at the invention of revolving doors followed by a hot architectural commodity: wood. Finally, producers Logan Shannon and Sam Evans-Brown bring us a story about a wild winter activity. No, not skiing or boarding, but animal tracking.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.!

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All Things Considered
5:36 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

1984 Primary Featured New Candidates - And A New Public Radio Service

Colorado Senator Gary Hart presented himself to New Hampshire voters as the candidate of new ideas, and used some old-fashioned campaigning in a victory over frontrunner Walter Mondale.

February 28th marks thirty years since the 1984 New Hampshire presidential primary. The ’84 election is often overlooked today – mostly because the general election saw Republican President Ronald Reagan beat Democrat Walter Mondale in a landslide - and yet, the 1984 primary was fairly influential.

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Word of Mouth
12:12 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

2.24.14: Modern & Monastic Food

Credit michaelmossbooks.com and Victoria Reay, Holly Hayes & William Jones via flickr Creative Commons

Prepare your palate, because we're bringing you a smorgasbord of stories; today's Word of Mouth is all about food! But taste with caution, sandwiched between stories of slime and frozen meat are stories of monastic meals and heavenly... beer? That's right, beer that was divinely sanctioned. Grab a snack and take a listen. You'll never think of food the same way again.

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From the Archives
4:54 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

From the Archives: President Lincoln

  

Have you hugged a President this week? Steve Wood has. As a card-carrying member of the Association of Lincoln Presenters, Wood assumes the garb, voice and character of the country’s 16th President to educate people about Lincoln’s life and legacy.

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Word of Mouth
12:12 am
Mon February 17, 2014

2.17.14: Presidents' Day

Credit WorldIslandInfo.com, Wystan, & U.S. Embassy New Delhi via Flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth celebrates Presidents’ Day with presidential portraits from Writers on a New England Stage. We’ll talk to three authors who took a deeper look into the complexities and motivations of American leaders throughout history.

 

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Word of Mouth
12:02 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Top 10 Lost Ski Sites In New Hampshire

Thorn Mountain
nelsap.org

Do you ski or snowboard? Do you find yourself going to the same crowded slopes all winter long? Do you need a change? If you said yes to any of these questions, then you need to discover (or rediscover) New Hampshire's 175 lost ski areas. The New England Lost Ski Areas Project (NELSAP) founded by Jeremy Davis has dedicated a website to sharing information, pictures, and brochures for those long lost ski spots. Even Concord, NHPR's hometown, has some lost gems at Russel's Pond and Snow Pond. Chances are, there's a hidden ski slope near year.

Here is Jeremy's list of the top 10 lost ski sites in New Hampshire:

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