History

Word of Mouth
1:12 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

3.6.14: Daylight Saving Time, Marissa Nadler, Revolving Doors, Wood & Animal Tracking

Credit Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth wishes you a happy Daylight Saving Time! (Can you believe it's this Sunday already?) But why exactly does the practice of changing our clocks even exist? We explore the ins and outs of Daylight Saving (without the extra "s") with a guest who wrote the book on it. Then Zach Nugent talks with Marissa Nadler whose most recent album was released in early February. We take an architectural turn with a look at the invention of revolving doors followed by a hot architectural commodity: wood. Finally, producers Logan Shannon and Sam Evans-Brown bring us a story about a wild winter activity. No, not skiing or boarding, but animal tracking.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.!

3.6.14: Daylight Saving Time, Marissa Nadler, Revolving Doors, Wood & Animal Tracking

Read more
All Things Considered
5:36 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

1984 Primary Featured New Candidates - And A New Public Radio Service

Colorado Senator Gary Hart presented himself to New Hampshire voters as the candidate of new ideas, and used some old-fashioned campaigning in a victory over frontrunner Walter Mondale.

February 28th marks thirty years since the 1984 New Hampshire presidential primary. The ’84 election is often overlooked today – mostly because the general election saw Republican President Ronald Reagan beat Democrat Walter Mondale in a landslide - and yet, the 1984 primary was fairly influential.

Read more
Word of Mouth
12:12 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

2.24.14: Modern & Monastic Food

Credit michaelmossbooks.com and Victoria Reay, Holly Hayes & William Jones via flickr Creative Commons

Prepare your palate, because we're bringing you a smorgasbord of stories; today's Word of Mouth is all about food! But taste with caution, sandwiched between stories of slime and frozen meat are stories of monastic meals and heavenly... beer? That's right, beer that was divinely sanctioned. Grab a snack and take a listen. You'll never think of food the same way again.

Listen to our full show and click Read More for individual segments.

2.24.14: Modern & Medieval Food

Read more
From the Archives
4:54 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

From the Archives: President Lincoln

  

Have you hugged a President this week? Steve Wood has. As a card-carrying member of the Association of Lincoln Presenters, Wood assumes the garb, voice and character of the country’s 16th President to educate people about Lincoln’s life and legacy.

Read more
Word of Mouth
12:12 am
Mon February 17, 2014

2.17.14: Presidents' Day

Credit WorldIslandInfo.com, Wystan, & U.S. Embassy New Delhi via Flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth celebrates Presidents’ Day with presidential portraits from Writers on a New England Stage. We’ll talk to three authors who took a deeper look into the complexities and motivations of American leaders throughout history.

 

Read more
Word of Mouth
12:02 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Top 10 Lost Ski Sites In New Hampshire

Thorn Mountain
nelsap.org

Do you ski or snowboard? Do you find yourself going to the same crowded slopes all winter long? Do you need a change? If you said yes to any of these questions, then you need to discover (or rediscover) New Hampshire's 175 lost ski areas. The New England Lost Ski Areas Project (NELSAP) founded by Jeremy Davis has dedicated a website to sharing information, pictures, and brochures for those long lost ski spots. Even Concord, NHPR's hometown, has some lost gems at Russel's Pond and Snow Pond. Chances are, there's a hidden ski slope near year.

Here is Jeremy's list of the top 10 lost ski sites in New Hampshire:

Read more
Word of Mouth
1:20 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

2.4.14: Ancient Emotion, Graham Cracker, Netflix Documentaries, And Doug Elkins

Credit oskay, Frank M, Rafik, and dolphinsdock via flickr Creative Commons

Guess what. (What?!). You got the better of Monday. Reward yourself with a healthy dose of Word of Mouth. Today, we're looking at mental illness in our ancient ancestors, the prudish beginnings of the graham cracker (minus the chocolate and marshmallow), Netflix documentaries, and the choreography of Doug Elkins. Dance your heart out, relax with Netflix, and replenish with a s'more. Just steer clear of the ancient hallucination-inducing furies. Listen to the full show and scroll down for more on each segment.

2.4.14: Ancient Emotion, Graham Cracker, Netflix Documentaries, and Doug Elkins

Read more
Word of Mouth
1:33 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

Pond Hockey : The Tradition Continues

Zach Nugent NHPR

Pond hockey has been a favorite winter activity for many hearty New Englanders since 1883, when the first hockey game ever played in the United States happened on the ponds at St. Paul’s school right in Concord. This weekend the pond hockey tradition continued at the 4th annual Black Ice Pond Hockey Championship at White Park in Concord.


Read more
Word of Mouth
1:00 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

1.27.14: Creepy Stories, Black Ice Pond Hockey & Richard III

Credit Zach Nugent / NHPR

Whether told by a campfire, or at a childhood slumber party, everyone loves a spooky story. Today on Word of Mouth we explore our ‘creepy’ appetite. And the macabre continues with the true story of the battle over Richard the III’s remains.  Although he reigned five centuries ago, his burial site has sparked a modern-day war of the roses among Britain’s Richard-files. Also on the show, the Black Ice Pond Hockey tournament celebrates its fourth year at White Park, and producer Zach Nugent sat on the bench to bring us the sights and sounds. Listen to the whole show below or click Read More to listen to individual segments.

1.27.14: Creepy Stories, Black Ice Pond Hockey & Richard III

Read more
Word of Mouth
1:05 pm
Thu January 16, 2014

"Something Like The Gods"

Credit Johnhenryf via Flickr Creative Commons

In the words of author Stephen Amidon, “no other figure is the focus of so much passion, controversy, expectation, and disappointment…” regardless of whether it is football or soccer, figure-skating or hockey, watching the world’s top athletes borders on hypnotic… and sometimes stands as proof of our ability to exceed physical human limitations and become something like the gods. That’s the name of long-time sports-lover and novelist Stephen Amidon’s new cultural history of the athlete, detailing sport from the first Olympic Games, to the rise of Lebron James.

Read more
Word of Mouth
2:48 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

Rethink 2014: America's Place In The Global Economy (Or, What's Wrong With Being Number Two?)

Credit Sara Plourde

After years of isolationism, the U.S. rose in the 20th century to become the world’s sole superpower. Today, economic growth is slow, unemployment and income inequality are rising, and political impasses have ground policy initiatives to a halt. America’s status in global manufacturing, education, and innovation is slipping. Many economists project that China is poised to overtake the U.S. as the world’s largest economy. It all sounds pretty bleak…but economist Charles Kenny paints a much rosier picture. In his book The Upside of Down: Why the Rise of the Rest is Good for the West he argues that Americans should stop worrying and learn to love the decline.

Read more
All Things Considered
4:17 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Hannah Duston Historic Site Will Keep Its Name For Now

The statue at the Hannah Dustin Memorial State Historic Site in Boscawen.
Credit Craig Michaud via Wikicommons

Republican state representative Gene Charron of Chester has withdrawn a bill that would have changed the name of the Hannah Duston State Historic Memorial Site in Boscawen to the Contoocook Island State Historic Site.

Read more
Word of Mouth
12:48 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

The Life Of Cavemen, Outside Of The Cave

Credit wikipedia.org

Throughout the world, hundreds of caves have been discovered containing artifacts and paintings from pre-historic times. The art work found in these caves has provided a glimpse into pre-historic culture, but our guest, anthropological archeologist Margaret Conkey says they only tell part of the story of early man. For her project “Between the Caves” she has pushed archeological research beyond the caves, into the landscapes where Paleolithic people lived and thrived.  

Read more
Word of Mouth
4:27 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Think Juicing Is Tough? Try Leeching.

Word of Mouth
12:59 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Lunar Conservation: Protecting America's Archeological History On The Moon

Feather left on the moon
NASA

China’s lunar rover, Jade Rabbit, landed on the moon to study the satellite’s terrain, geology, and lava flows. What else might it find? Dirty laundry, golf balls, bags of human waste, and an American flag.  There are loads of items left on the moon by NASA’s Apollo missions -- still perfectly preserved because the moon lacks a destructive atmosphere. With a handful of countries announcing plans for future lunar missions, a number of scientists are arguing that moon trash is an archeological treasure that should be preserved and studied by future generations. But with no laws or lunar governing body to protect, say, the first footprint on the moon, some worry that America’s lunar heritage could be destroyed by a new generation of explorers rushing to reach the moon.

Read more

Pages