History

Word of Mouth
1:20 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

2.4.14: Ancient Emotion, Graham Cracker, Netflix Documentaries, And Doug Elkins

Credit oskay, Frank M, Rafik, and dolphinsdock via flickr Creative Commons

Guess what. (What?!). You got the better of Monday. Reward yourself with a healthy dose of Word of Mouth. Today, we're looking at mental illness in our ancient ancestors, the prudish beginnings of the graham cracker (minus the chocolate and marshmallow), Netflix documentaries, and the choreography of Doug Elkins. Dance your heart out, relax with Netflix, and replenish with a s'more. Just steer clear of the ancient hallucination-inducing furies. Listen to the full show and scroll down for more on each segment.

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Word of Mouth
1:33 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

Pond Hockey : The Tradition Continues

Zach Nugent NHPR

Pond hockey has been a favorite winter activity for many hearty New Englanders since 1883, when the first hockey game ever played in the United States happened on the ponds at St. Paul’s school right in Concord. This weekend the pond hockey tradition continued at the 4th annual Black Ice Pond Hockey Championship at White Park in Concord.


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Word of Mouth
1:00 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

1.27.14: Creepy Stories, Black Ice Pond Hockey & Richard III

Credit Zach Nugent / NHPR

Whether told by a campfire, or at a childhood slumber party, everyone loves a spooky story. Today on Word of Mouth we explore our ‘creepy’ appetite. And the macabre continues with the true story of the battle over Richard the III’s remains.  Although he reigned five centuries ago, his burial site has sparked a modern-day war of the roses among Britain’s Richard-files. Also on the show, the Black Ice Pond Hockey tournament celebrates its fourth year at White Park, and producer Zach Nugent sat on the bench to bring us the sights and sounds. Listen to the whole show below or click Read More to listen to individual segments.


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Word of Mouth
1:05 pm
Thu January 16, 2014

"Something Like The Gods"

Credit Johnhenryf via Flickr Creative Commons

In the words of author Stephen Amidon, “no other figure is the focus of so much passion, controversy, expectation, and disappointment…” regardless of whether it is football or soccer, figure-skating or hockey, watching the world’s top athletes borders on hypnotic… and sometimes stands as proof of our ability to exceed physical human limitations and become something like the gods. That’s the name of long-time sports-lover and novelist Stephen Amidon’s new cultural history of the athlete, detailing sport from the first Olympic Games, to the rise of Lebron James.

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Word of Mouth
2:48 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

Rethink 2014: America's Place In The Global Economy (Or, What's Wrong With Being Number Two?)

Credit Sara Plourde

After years of isolationism, the U.S. rose in the 20th century to become the world’s sole superpower. Today, economic growth is slow, unemployment and income inequality are rising, and political impasses have ground policy initiatives to a halt. America’s status in global manufacturing, education, and innovation is slipping. Many economists project that China is poised to overtake the U.S. as the world’s largest economy. It all sounds pretty bleak…but economist Charles Kenny paints a much rosier picture. In his book The Upside of Down: Why the Rise of the Rest is Good for the West he argues that Americans should stop worrying and learn to love the decline.

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All Things Considered
4:17 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Hannah Duston Historic Site Will Keep Its Name For Now

The statue at the Hannah Dustin Memorial State Historic Site in Boscawen.
Credit Craig Michaud via Wikicommons

Republican state representative Gene Charron of Chester has withdrawn a bill that would have changed the name of the Hannah Duston State Historic Memorial Site in Boscawen to the Contoocook Island State Historic Site.

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Word of Mouth
12:48 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

The Life Of Cavemen, Outside Of The Cave

Credit wikipedia.org

Throughout the world, hundreds of caves have been discovered containing artifacts and paintings from pre-historic times. The art work found in these caves has provided a glimpse into pre-historic culture, but our guest, anthropological archeologist Margaret Conkey says they only tell part of the story of early man. For her project “Between the Caves” she has pushed archeological research beyond the caves, into the landscapes where Paleolithic people lived and thrived.  

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Word of Mouth
4:27 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Think Juicing Is Tough? Try Leeching.

Word of Mouth
12:59 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Lunar Conservation: Protecting America's Archeological History On The Moon

Feather left on the moon
NASA

China’s lunar rover, Jade Rabbit, landed on the moon to study the satellite’s terrain, geology, and lava flows. What else might it find? Dirty laundry, golf balls, bags of human waste, and an American flag.  There are loads of items left on the moon by NASA’s Apollo missions -- still perfectly preserved because the moon lacks a destructive atmosphere. With a handful of countries announcing plans for future lunar missions, a number of scientists are arguing that moon trash is an archeological treasure that should be preserved and studied by future generations. But with no laws or lunar governing body to protect, say, the first footprint on the moon, some worry that America’s lunar heritage could be destroyed by a new generation of explorers rushing to reach the moon.

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Word of Mouth
1:11 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

How Should We Live?

Credit Courtesy of romankrznaric.com

As the fizzy, busy holiday season draws to a close, we’re pausing to reflect on how we navigate a world so unlike that of our parents. Today, no job is a job for life... We live longer but will likely retire with less. We now interact with friends more online than in person, value is measured in page views and how we choose to live could have severe consequences for the future of the planet.

So, how to pursue a life that has meaning and richness in today’s world? Roman Krznaric suggests looking to the past. He’s out with a new book called “How Should We Live?” which peers into the near and ancient past for examples of how people through the ages approached love, work, family, time, money, death, creativity, and more.

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The Exchange
1:08 pm
Thu December 26, 2013

250 Years In The Making: Stories From 13 New Hampshire Towns

Credit Sara Plourde / NHPR

In a year-long series called “250 Years In The Making: Stories From 13 New Hampshire Towns," NHPR’s Keith Shields has traveled all across the Granite State, learning the unique stories of these towns and how their tales also reflect the broader narrative of new Hampshire history.

GUESTS:

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Word of Mouth
1:48 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Paper Is Dead! Long Live Paper!

Credit pawpaw67 via flickr Creative Commons

The digital age has rendered letter writing, paperboys, and checkbooks as old-fashioned as the rotary phone. While the proliferation of e-books, e-mail, and online newspapers appear to be hastening the death of the printed page, Nicholas Basbanes argues that we are far from becoming a paperless society. Nicholas is an impassioned bibliophile and author of On Paper: The Everything of its Two-Thousand-Year History.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon December 16, 2013

250 Years In The Making: Stories From 13 New Hampshire Towns

Credit Sara Plourde / NHPR

In a year-long series called “250 Years In The Making: Stories From 13 New Hampshire Towns," NHPR’s Keith Shields has traveled all across the Granite State, learning the unique stories of these towns and how their tales also reflect the broader narrative of new Hampshire history.

GUESTS:

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Marking History
6:00 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Textile Mills To UFO Abductions: 'Marking History' In New Hampshire

NHTI President Lynn Kilchenstein, left, poses with students at the unveiling of a historic marker last month.
Credit NHPR / Michael Brindley

When you’re just driving by, they all look pretty much the same.

“The green and white markers everyone sees around our highways; to mark important events, important people, important things about New Hampshire.”

But Elizabeth Muzzey, who directs the state’s Division of Historical resources, says when you look a little closer, you find each of the state’s 236 historical markers tells a unique story.

There’s one in New Ipswich marking the first textile mill.

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Word of Mouth
12:29 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

NH Magician Performs As 19th Century Illusionist

Courtesy of Andrew Pinard

Andrew Pinard’s website features video from the kinds of performances you might expect from a contemporary working magician: entertaining audiences at conventions, business meetings and a group of teens at a post-graduation party.

On Saturday, Andrew will take on another guise, and another century. He’ll be performing as the 19th century magician Jonathan Harrington at Canterbury Shaker Village, and he’s here to give us a preview, and a little bit of information on just who this Harrington is.

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