History

History
4:03 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

234 Years Later, Committee Passes Bill To Emancipate 14 Slaves

Credit Broadside quoting Marquis de Lafayette, issued 1800-1899 / Rare Books Collection, Boston Public Library, Flickr Creative Commons

Back in 1779, 20 slaves made the case for their freedom before the New Hampshire General Court.  After noting it wasn’t the right time, the body postponed the decision “to a more convenient opportunity.” 

Lawmakers never took that opportunity, and 14 of the petitioners died as slaves. 

But on Wednesday, a Senate committee unanimously passed the bill.  

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Word of Mouth
1:44 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

The Original Luddite

We all have one:  the friend who refuses to take part in social media, has only a landline, shuns digital cameras, the Mp3, and just about anything else with a computer chip.  The hearty  souls who refuse such technologies tend to inspire a lot of eye-rolling – with a measure of respect.  For the rest of us, choosing the life of a Luddite hardly seems like an option.  The history of the term “Luddite”, and the man for which it was coined is a surprisingly violent one, tracing back to the late 18th century.  Morgan Meis is a freelance writer and editor at “Three Quarks Daily."  Recently, he wrote about the original Luddite, Ned Ludd, and he joins us to tell us more.

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Blogs
11:35 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Historic Doodles And The Great Minds Who Drew Them

Credit via The Atlantic

Our conversation with Sunni Brown sparked an interest in history's doodles; here are some great minds that weren't afraid to scribble a shape or two on their stationary.


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All Things Considered
2:20 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

Franklin Pierce's Inaugural Day: Unique Touches And Great Challenges

Engraving of Franklin Pierce taking the oath of office in 1853.
Credit Library of Congress

Every American president has taken the same oath of office that President Barack Obama took earlier today - every president except one.

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Word of Mouth
9:53 am
Fri December 14, 2012

Word of Mouth 12.15.2012

Credit Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

An anthropologist embeds herself with hackers. Santa opens shop in Hooksett. A Hobbit scholar explains why Tolkien fascinates. Women comedians find success on through podcasts. And the very interesting history...of boredom.

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Word of Mouth
9:53 am
Fri December 14, 2012

Word of Mouth 12.15.2012

Credit Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

An anthropologist embeds herself with hackers. Santa opens shop in Hooksett. A Hobbit scholar explains why Tolkien fascinates. Women comedians find success on through podcasts. And the very interesting history...of boredom.

Part 1:

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Word of Mouth
10:58 am
Tue December 11, 2012

The History of Boredom May Interest You

Credit aagius via Flickr Creative Commons

We spoke with Linda Rodriguez McRobbie about the history of boredom. Not surprisingly, scientists avoided studying the subject until the last century.  Studies suggest that boredom can lead to depression and other adverse health conditions, even death.  


To keep the doctors away, we've curated a motley assortment of "boring" film and television clips.


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Word of Mouth
11:00 am
Fri December 7, 2012

Word of Mouth 12.08.2012

Credit Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth's weekly program. This week's show features an art blog that uses Google Earth images to show the battlefields of drones, a radio show produced in an an insane asylum, Ty Burr's "Gods Like Us," and history's badass-iest nuns. Plus, webcast funerals!

Part 1:

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Word of Mouth
11:49 am
Tue December 4, 2012

4 Surprising Facts About Popular Board Games

100 Games - Cupcake Edition
Credit Z Andrei via Flickr Creative Commons

After researching our segment on the unknown origins of Monopoly, we decided to keep looking for other games with surprising backstories.  We hope that they will inspire your game-based holiday gift-giving.


1. Clue was originally invented as a game to play in underground bunkers to wait out lengthy air raid drills during World War II. Due to such turbulent times,  its initial production was heavily delayed due shortages of material.

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Word of Mouth
10:34 am
Tue December 4, 2012

The (Truly) Shocking History of Monopoly

GO TO JAIL. How fun!
Credit wootam! via Flickr Creative Commons

I hate Monopoly. Always have. The reason is simple: it's impossible to play the game and feel good, even if you win. Monopoly, simply put, is all about crushing  your fellow players through bankruptcy, even if they're your own kids. Turns out, there might be a reason for my hatred of Monopoly.


The most popular game in the world, according to this amazing article in Harpers, is, simply put, theft. And it has an incredible, almost unbelievable history:

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The Exchange
9:04 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Live In Keene with Dayton Duncan (Rebroadcast)

If you don't know the name, Dayton Duncan, you'll most likely be familiar with his work. He's an award winning writer and filmmaker who has been Ken Burn's right hand man for decades. The two have collaborated on multi-hour films on topics that have ranged from Lewis and Clark to the Civil War to Baseball to our National Parks. Last Fall, I spoke with Duncan before a live audience in Keene about his long time collaboration with filmmaker Ken Burns, what it takes to put together these multi-hour collaborations and gained some insights on some of his latest projects. 

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Word of Mouth
11:01 am
Tue October 30, 2012

The History Of Freak Storms

Credit chascar via Flickr Creative Commons

In the lead up to last night’s powerful landfall in Southern New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy was branded as a so-called “franken-storm”, lacking precedent among meteorological records…  here to explain more, and look back at some of history’s strangest and most destructive storms is Christopher Burt.  He’s a weather historian with the online service Weather Underground, and author of th

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Word of Mouth
9:50 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Weapons: The Great Equalizer?

EliasSchewel via Flickr Creative Commons

For those who live under oppressive regimes, weapons are the subduing tool of tyrants.  But for many others, they’re thought of as the great equalizer.  Consider the principle behind the much debated 2nd amendment:  “A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” In the latest issue of New-Scientist, Laura Spinney investigates an opposing theo

Word of Mouth
10:18 am
Wed October 10, 2012

The Great New England Vampire Panic

virginsuicide photography via Flickr Creative Commons

New England's gruesome brush with supernatural hysteria did not end with the Salem witch trials in the 17th century.  Almost two centuries later came the great New England vampire panic.  Wait… what?  Abigail Tucker is a staff writer for Smithosonian magazine – she wrote about historians who are documenting cases when rural residents set aside their Yankee piety and feverishly exhumed graves and mutilated the corpses of suspected blood-suckers.  The panic is la

The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon October 8, 2012

1493 (Rebroadcast)

In a new book, author Charles Mann explores what happened in the years after Columbus’s famed voyage to the Americas. He says it altered everything: sparking a new era of globalization and not just in commerce: but radical changes in crops, cultures, and politics. We’ll talk with Mann about this expansive look at this new era and how the world changed after Columbus.

Guests

  • Charles C. Mann - Author of 1493:Uncovering the New World Columbus Created
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