History

The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu July 4, 2013

A New Look At Calvin Coolidge (Rebroadcast)

Biographer Amity Shlaes say our thirtieth president was deeper than his nickname Silent Cal suggests or what his critics called a man of few words and.. frequent naps.. but a visionary conservative who promoted ideas of limited government and individual responsibility and who oversaw an era of remarkable growth and optimism that preceded the Great Depression.

Guest

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All Things Considered
6:08 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Sailors, Artists, Tavern Keepers, And Mayors Among Portsmouth's Most Notable Women

The cover of "Portsmouth Women."

A new book aims to tell the stories of some of the most remarkable women in the history of Portsmouth, from colonial tavern keepers to nationally-known artists, politicians, philanthropists and more.

It's called Portsmouth Women: Madams and Matriarchs Who Shaped New Hampshire's Port City.

The book's editor, Laura Pope, talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about some of the women featured in the book.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Wed May 1, 2013

The Federal Income Tax Turns One-Hundred

Americans recently completed that annual ritual, when they file their returns to Uncle Sam.  But over the century of this tax, there’s been lots of debate on its effectiveness and fairness. and a few states, including New Hampshire have decided not to do this at the state level.  We’ll look at the history of the income tax and how it’s evolved.

Guests

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon April 29, 2013

A New Look At Calvin Coolidge

Biographer Amity Shlaes say our thirtieth president was deeper than his nickname Silent Cal suggests or what his critics called a man of few words and.. frequent naps.. but a visionary conservative who promoted ideas of limited government and individual responsibility  and who oversaw an era of remarkable growth and optimism that preceded the Great Depression.

Guest

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Giving Matters
12:09 am
Sat March 30, 2013

Keeping History Alive At The Fells

Credit Seeing New England

John Hay was private secretary to Abraham Lincoln and secretary of state under Theodore Roosevelt. His summer estate on Lake Sunapee was a masterpiece of architecture and of horticultural artistry. In 1987, the estate was deeded to the US Fish and Wildlife Service and opened to the public, and recently became a private non-profit offering programs, tours and classes. David Bashaw is a volunteer docent, guiding tours at the Fells.

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Word of Mouth
10:07 am
Mon March 11, 2013

The Measure Of Civilization

Ian Morris
Credit via stanford.edu

IAN MORRIS, Professor of Classics and History at Stanford University and a Fellow of the Stanford Archaeology Center, is author of several books including, Why the West Rules—For Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future, which was published in 2010, and his latest, The Measure of Civilization: How Social Development Decides the Fate of Nations. We spoke with professor Morris about his new book, the seminar he gave at Langley to members of the CIA, and his early heavy metal aspirations.

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NH News
8:30 am
Mon March 11, 2013

1763: A Landmark Year In New Hampshire History

This year, 13 New Hampshire towns are celebrating their 250th anniversaries.  As part of a new series called “250 Years In The Making: Stories From 13 New Hampshire Towns," NHPR’s Keith Shields will travel to each of these places, learn more about their founding and find the unique stories buried within their borders. But before we do, we begin with a look back two and a half centuries to the year 1763.

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History
4:03 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

234 Years Later, Committee Passes Bill To Emancipate 14 Slaves

Credit Broadside quoting Marquis de Lafayette, issued 1800-1899 / Rare Books Collection, Boston Public Library, Flickr Creative Commons

Back in 1779, 20 slaves made the case for their freedom before the New Hampshire General Court.  After noting it wasn’t the right time, the body postponed the decision “to a more convenient opportunity.” 

Lawmakers never took that opportunity, and 14 of the petitioners died as slaves. 

But on Wednesday, a Senate committee unanimously passed the bill.  

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Word of Mouth
1:44 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

The Original Luddite

We all have one:  the friend who refuses to take part in social media, has only a landline, shuns digital cameras, the Mp3, and just about anything else with a computer chip.  The hearty  souls who refuse such technologies tend to inspire a lot of eye-rolling – with a measure of respect.  For the rest of us, choosing the life of a Luddite hardly seems like an option.  The history of the term “Luddite”, and the man for which it was coined is a surprisingly violent one, tracing back to the late 18th century.  Morgan Meis is a freelance writer and editor at “Three Quarks Daily."  Recently, he wrote about the original Luddite, Ned Ludd, and he joins us to tell us more.

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Word of Mouth
11:35 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Historic Doodles And The Great Minds Who Drew Them

Credit via The Atlantic

Our conversation with Sunni Brown sparked an interest in history's doodles; here are some great minds that weren't afraid to scribble a shape or two on their stationary.

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All Things Considered
2:20 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

Franklin Pierce's Inaugural Day: Unique Touches And Great Challenges

Engraving of Franklin Pierce taking the oath of office in 1853.
Credit Library of Congress

Every American president has taken the same oath of office that President Barack Obama took earlier today - every president except one.

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Word of Mouth
9:53 am
Fri December 14, 2012

Word of Mouth 12.15.2012

Credit Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

An anthropologist embeds herself with hackers. Santa opens shop in Hooksett. A Hobbit scholar explains why Tolkien fascinates. Women comedians find success on through podcasts. And the very interesting history...of boredom.

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Word of Mouth
9:53 am
Fri December 14, 2012

Word of Mouth 12.15.2012

Credit Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

An anthropologist embeds herself with hackers. Santa opens shop in Hooksett. A Hobbit scholar explains why Tolkien fascinates. Women comedians find success on through podcasts. And the very interesting history...of boredom.

Part 1:

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Word of Mouth
10:58 am
Tue December 11, 2012

The History of Boredom May Interest You

Credit aagius via Flickr Creative Commons

We spoke with Linda Rodriguez McRobbie about the history of boredom. Not surprisingly, scientists avoided studying the subject until the last century.  Studies suggest that boredom can lead to depression and other adverse health conditions, even death.  


To keep the doctors away, we've curated a motley assortment of "boring" film and television clips.


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Word of Mouth
11:00 am
Fri December 7, 2012

Word of Mouth 12.08.2012

Credit Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth's weekly program. This week's show features an art blog that uses Google Earth images to show the battlefields of drones, a radio show produced in an an insane asylum, Ty Burr's "Gods Like Us," and history's badass-iest nuns. Plus, webcast funerals!

Part 1:

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