History

Word of Mouth
9:53 am
Wed July 25, 2012

History Lost in Time

Photo Credit Ashur, Via Flickr Creative Commons

Following the holocaust was the single greatest forged migration in human history, orchestrated by…the allies. Didn’t know about one of the darkest sides of the allies World War II victory?…well, neither did we. Today we explore why some events make the history books and others are lost in time, and how historians have shaped the history that we remember and the history we choose to forget. Our guest Ray Douglas is chairman of the history department at Colgate University.

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All Things Considered
4:46 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

The Tall Ship Privateers Who Shaped the War of 1812

The Pride of Baltimore II in Portsmouth in 2007.
Courtesy Roger Goun via Flickr/CC - http://www.flickr.com/photos/sskennel/748581002/in/photostream/

Today is the first day of Sail Portsmouth, a four day festival of tall ships on New Hampshire’s Seacoast.

One of the featured ships in this year’s festival is called The Pride of Baltimore II. It’s a recreation of a topsail schooner that served as a privateer in the War of 1812 - ships that shaped the course of the war between the United States and Britain two hundred years ago.

"Short, easy, infallible"

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Word of Mouth
10:43 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Awesome Kickstarter

Photo Credit Tbanneck, Via Flickr Creative Commons

We talk with Brady Carlson about his awesome Kickstarter project that aims to dig up the history of presidential grave sites.

All Things Considered
6:45 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

The Life and Career of Manchester's "Sweater Queen"

May Gruber in 2007, when she took part in the StoryCorps in New Hampshire project.

Longtime residents of Manchester may remember a large, stylized sign in the mill district, for Pandora sweaters, one of the area's biggest operations. A recent documentary tells the story of Pandora and of its longtime owner, May Gruber. It’s called “Sweater Queen.”

Nancy Beach is producer of the film, which is screening later this week in Manchester. She tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about May Gruber's life and career.

The Exchange
9:22 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Vivre La Difference! Franco-Americans' Deep Roots in the Granite State

jimmywayne via Flickr Creative Commons

We explore the history of French Canadians in the Granite State with Franco-American scholar Robert Perreault. Arguably no other culture has had a greater influence on New Hampshire than Franco-Americans. We'll look at why they came, where they settled, and the idea of "La Survivance," which kept their culture alive and well in such cities as Manchester, Nashua, and Berlin.

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All Things Considered
5:42 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

A Shipyard Tragedy Almost Fifty Years Ago

The USS Thresher in 1961, two years before it sank in the Atlantic.
From the collections of the Naval Historical Center. USNHC # NH 97551.

Navy officials continue to investigate the massive fire at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard.

The blaze caused hundreds of millions of dollars in damage to the USS Miami nuclear submarine, which had come to Portsmouth for an overhaul.

For longtime Seacoast residents, the accident brings to mind the tragedy of the USS Thresher, a nuclear sub based in Portsmouth. Nearly a half century ago, the Thresher sank several hundred miles off the East Coast; all of its 129 crew members died.

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Word of Mouth
10:15 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Architectural Forensics

Photo Credit J.Scaper, Via Flickr Creative Commons

Smartphones make it relatively easy to record and monitor suspected law-breaking in real time, but what about crimes in the pre-smartphone era? Word of mouth producer Rebecca Lavoie tagged along with an unusual gumshoe…one who scours old buildings for evidence of architectural crimes.   

 

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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Mon June 4, 2012

U.S., Vietnam Exchange Pieces Of History: Two Soldiers' Last Writings

Vietnamese Minister of Defense Phuong Quang Thanh (right) presents the personal letters of U.S. Army Sgt. Steve Flaherty to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta.
Jim Watson Pool/Getty Images

(NPR's Larry Abramson is among the correspondents traveling with Defense Secretary Leon Panetta in Asia this week. In Vietnam earlier today, the government there told Panetta it will open three new sites for excavation — in the hope of finding U.S. troops' remains.

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Word of Mouth
12:48 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

This is What Democracy Sounded Like

Monticello
(Photo by multipletrees via Flickr Creative Commons)

The words of Thomas Jefferson ring in the ears and characters of Americans, yet his actual voice remains unknown. Likewise, visitors to Monticello get a window into his daily life and genius, but can only imagine the mix of pastoral and industrious sounds of the farm operating at full tilt.

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Word of Mouth
10:37 am
Wed May 16, 2012

The “Who Done It” of Vladimir Lenin’s Death

Photo by alogou1775, via Flickr Creative Commons

A Soviet news reel shows teary mourners shuffling past the body of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin.  The Bolshevik leader and chair of the soviet state in its early years died of a he died of an apparent massive stroke in 1924 at age 54. His embalmed corpse still throngs of visitors to his tomb in Moscow’s Red Square, and was the topic of an annual clinicopathological conference held at the University of Maryland.

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Word of Mouth
1:05 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

America the Amateur

Photo by brizzle born and bred, via Flickr Creative Commons

America loves amateurs. The country was founded by dilettantes and enlightened rebels. Cities, farms and businesses were seeded by adventurous greenhorns and neophytes. Writer Jack Hitt argues that the DIY spirit that generated untold number of patents and subscriptions to Popular Mechanics drives the country’s success and identity. The popular TV shows The Voice and Project Runway continue a long tradition of discovering and rewarding talent.

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Word of Mouth
10:48 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Garbology

(Photo by Stinkenroboter via Flickr Creative Commons)

You may have heard that Americans throw away more than any other nation, but any idea of just how much? Each of us is on track to toss 102 tons of garbage in our lifetime. More than 7 pounds a day, and twice what we chucked out in 1960. Pulitzer Prize winner Edward Humes believes we are living in a state of garbage denial. His new book is called Garbology: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash. In it, he looks at the science, politics, and economics of waste.  

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Books
11:04 am
Fri April 20, 2012

The St. Cuthbert Gospel: Looking Pretty Good At 1,300

The Gospel, buried with St. Cuthbert in 698, was recovered from his grave in 1104. Its beautiful red leather binding is original.
Courtesy of the British Library

How much would you pay for a very rare book?

The British Library in London has just paid about $14 million to purchase Europe's oldest intact book, known as the St. Cuthbert Gospel. It's a copy of the Gospel of St. John, thought to have been produced in northeastern England sometime during the seventh century.

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Sports
7:35 pm
Thu April 19, 2012

A Century Of Joy And Heartbreak At Fenway Park

The flag covers the Green Monster as the national anthem is played before the game between the Boston Red Sox and the Tampa Bay Rays on April 16 at Fenway Park in Boston.
Elsa Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 12:09 pm

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what it is about Fenway Park. A century after it was built, fans still gush about this "lyric little bandbox," as John Updike called it. To guys like Ed Carpenter, Fenway is history and home, magic and mystique.

"I love this place," he says, tearing up. "I mean, it's not mortar and bricks and seats."

Carpenter first started coming to Fenway with his dad in 1949, when he was 6.

"We walked up this ramp right behind this home plate," he recalls. "I can still see everything was green, emerald green. It was love at first sight."

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History
6:37 pm
Tue April 17, 2012

How America 'Struck Back': Doolittle Raid Turns 70

U.S. Navy crewmen watch a B-25 bomber take off from the USS Hornet for the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo on April 18, 1942.
AP

It's just after sunrise outside the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, when 20 B-25 bombers start showing up in the western sky.

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