hunting

via New Hampshire Fish and Game website

New Hampshire Fish and Game is now selling combined lifetime hunting and fishing licenses for newborns.

The licenses can be used once the child is sixteen years old.

Maine and Vermont already offer similar deals. New Hampshire Fish and Game reports it has been getting calls over the past few years asking for them in the Granite State.

Flickr/mo1229

The cost of a license to hunt and fish in New Hampshire would increase next year under a draft proposal outlined Wednesday by the Fish and Game Department.

Under the proposal, a resident fishing license for all species would go from $33 to $38. Hunting licenses for New Hampshire residents would from $21 to $30. And a combination hunting and fishing license would go from $44 to $56.

Officials say the increases are needed to fill a $1.1 million revenue gap.

KevinChang / Flickr

 

New Hampshire's Fish and Game Commission is meeting Wednesday to discuss potential hunting and fishing license fee increases, which haven't gone up in at least 12 years.

During the 2015 session, the state Legislature granted the department's executive director and commission the authority to set hunting and fishing license fees.

The commission is meeting at 1 p.m. at the Fish and Game Department in Concord.

Fish And Game's Glenn Normandeau

May 11, 2015
Kevin Micalizzi / Flickr/CC

Fish and Game Executive Director joins us to discuss his agency's mission, its 150th anniversary, and its wildlife management planning process - including decisions around hunting permits and fishing catch limits.

Shannon Dooling for NHPR

 

The state's turkey flocks are in good shape after the winter and officials say the spring hunt should be a good one.

Fish and Game turkey biologist Ted Walski says an abundance of acorns kept the birds fed and crusty snow in December and January meant they could get around more easily to find food and evade predators.

The spring turkey season for licensed hunters opens May 3 and runs through May 31 statewide.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

  New Hampshire Fish and Game held a public hearing today on rules to keep hunters from using new, potentially unfair technologies.

The rules would prohibit the use of surveillance drones, so-called smart rifles and live-action game cameras—which send images to hunters’ smart phones—to aid in hunting.

Most who turned out opposed drones and smart rifles.

But several people like Jack Baltz of Freedom thought banning the use of live-action game cameras might be going too far.

Don McCullough/Flickr

    

At a hearing Thursday, officials from New Hampshire Fish & Game will propose new rules banning drones, smart rifles, and live-action game cameras in hunting.

Officials are trying to regulate these so-called emerging technologies, saying they’re not appropriate or ethical.

New Hampshire is not the first state to tackle this issue.

Moosicorn Ranch via Flickr CC

While several states have already outlawed the use of drones in hunting, New Hampshire may go further and ban so-called "smart rifles" and live-action game cameras as well.

The state Fish and Game Department is holding a public hearing next Thursday on proposed rules involving hunting with the use of emerging technologies.

Courtesy NH Fish and Game

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department says bear hunters are having a more successful season than last year, while the deer harvest is down slightly.

Bear season has ended in most of the state, though it remains open in some areas until Nov. 25. Fish and Game officials say as of Nov. 6, a total of 703 bears had been killed, or about 30 percent more than the same period last year.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire's moose season has come to an end, with at least 91 hunters succeeding in bagging a moose during the nine-day period.

The Fish and Game Department says a total of 127 permits were issued, representing a statewide success rate of 72 percent. That's fewer permits than in recent years, due to a drop in the moose population.

Courtesy of Crawford Notch Campground

Bear hunting season has started in New Hampshire, and the state's bear project leader says it's expected to be a good one.

WMUR-TV reports Andy Timmins says with a current bear population estimated at 5,700 animals, bears are at the desired population goal in most areas of the state.

Michael Webber via Flickr CC

Supporters of a referendum to ban the use of bait, hounds and traps in Maine's annual bear hunt began canvassing neighborhoods in Portland over the weekend. Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting say they don't oppose hunting in general, just the use of what they consider cruel and inhumane practices. They plan to contact tens of thousands of voters across the state over the next few weeks to make their case. Opponents are also gearing up.  And both sides are feeling confident as the election draws closer.

Moose Munching
AL_HikesAZ / Flickr Creative Commons

The deadline is approaching to enter New Hampshire's moose permit lottery.       Entries are due Friday, May 30.    The state is offering permits to 124 winners for this year's moose hunt, which runs from Oct. 18-26.  Last year's statewide hunter success rate for moose was 64 percent.   Winners will be selected through a computerized random drawing and announced on Friday, June 20.  To enter, visit http://www.huntnh.com to apply online or print out a mail-in application. Participants also can pick up a lottery application from any Fish and Game office or license agent.

Funding Fish And Game

Apr 2, 2014
kittynh / Flickr/CC

This agency does much more than serve hunters and anglers, it’s also involved in search and rescue, land conservation, and habitat management.  Despite all these responsibilities, hunting and fishing license fees are the main revenue source. Now, some in the Statehouse are taking hard look expanding that base - to hikers, canoers, and the many others who enjoy the great outdoors.

GUESTS:

A free workshop covering the basics of hunting wild turkeys is being held by the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department next month in Holderness.   Dave Priebe, a hunter education instructor and Quaker Boy Turkey Calls pro staff member, will cover the basics of turkey hunting, turkey calling and turkey hunting safety at the event on Saturday, April 19. The workshop takes place from 9 a.m. to noon at the Owl Brook Hunter Education Center.   Fish and Game wildlife biologist Ted Walski will talk about the natural history and behavior of wild turkeys.

 

New Hampshire U.S. Rep. Annie Kuster says hunters who donate wild game to food banks should be eligible for a tax deduction to cover the costs of processing.

Sean Hurley

They eat your crops, they scold you from the treetops, they prey on songbirds.  Experts consider the crow, which can use tools and recognize human faces, one of the smartest birds.  And while many people don’t know it, crows are also hunted in NH.

Sheryl Rich-Kern

For taxidermists like Rick Bewersdorf, business is booming.

"We're hoping for anywhere from 20 to 40 deer heads this year," said Bewersdorf, who has a workshop in a barn in Nashua. "We've already got seven full mount bear in with some rugs."

Rifle season for whitetail deer began only a couple of weeks ago. But already, wildlife officials say the state has topped its record for registered deer kills  compared to the previous nine years.

That's good news for taxidermists.

Lead in Hunting Ammo and Fishing Tackle

Oct 19, 2012
KevinChang / Flickr

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine


Dear EarthTalk: What's the big deal about lead in hunting ammunition and fishing tackle? If an animal is going to die anyway, it's not going to get lead poisoning, right?                

Photo by Dovak, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

In Wisconsin, a bill that would authorize a hunting and trapping season for wolves sits on Governor Scott Walker’s desk.  The bill pits republican and democratic supporters against environmental and conservation groups who say the proposal has no basis is the science of wildlife management.

Photo by Ulterior Epicure via Flickr Creative Commons

 A warning to vegetarians and vegans, this segment is about meat. And fish. And foul. Take coffee-crusted elkstrap, pheasant marsala, or country-fried antelope...yup, gourmet game.

Colin Kearns is deputy editor of Field and Stream Magazine, and editor of the Wild Chef column and blog, where such recipes are shared with hunters and consumers of all things hunted. 

 

 

I have done a lot of things in New Hampshire.

I have climbed Mount Monadnock in a sleet-storm, ridden a snow machine deep into the woods of Coos County; I have met future presidents, made maple syrup, split untold cords of firewood, battled ice dams, swallowed black flies; I’ve eaten beans that had been cooked in a hole in the ground in Berlin. 

I’ve been to the Isles of Shoals and to Donald Hall’s living room.

I once presented Hugh Gregg with the gift of a sack full of turnips.