Hurricane

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with a New Hampshire mother last week who was unable to contact her daughter after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico.

Valerie Mowbray, from the town of Holderness, didn’t hear from her daughter Moria Nickerson for days after the category 5 hurricane. Nickerson lives on the Island of Vieques with her boyfriend and their three dogs.

NOAA Satellites

A New Hampshire mother is still trying to get ahold of her daughter after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico last week.

Valerie Mowbray, from the town of Holderness, has been unable to make contact with her daughter Moria since the category 5 hurricane hit the Island of Vieques.

Outside of a few Satellite phones, there is no way for those stranded to communicate with anyone off the island.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Mowbray by phone on Monday.

This transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Volunteers with the New Hampshire Beach Monitoring program are taking measurements of the state's beaches ahead of Hurricane Jose.

As volunteer Sherri Townsend explains, scientists want to know how the storm will impact the topography of the beach.

"We're just measuring if there's any changes in where the berm is, and how high the berm is, and the slope of the berm -- which is the high point, when the storm surge comes up."

Updated at 5:30 a.m. ET

The National Hurricane Center says Hurricane Maria is an extremely dangerous storm. It was a Category 5 storm when it hit the island of Dominica. Later it was downgraded to a Category 4 hurricane. But a short time ago, forecasters says Maria had regained the strength of a Category 5 hurricane.

Updated at 3:15 a.m. ET Tuesday

National Hurricane Center - NOAA

Florida residents prepared for Hurricane Irma as it made its way across the Caribbean Islands Wednesday.

David True, a former, longtime resident of New Hampshire, moved from Portsmouth to Daytona, Florida in November of last year. He lives on a 40-foot aft cabin boat named Scallywag with Bella, his rescue German shepherd.

Updated at 5:00 a.m. ET Friday

The National Hurricane Center says Irma is now a Category 4 storm. It has maximum sustained winds of 155 mph.

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

Hurricane Irma continued its northwestward sweep Thursday evening, losing little steam as it skirted the Dominican Republic and Haiti and bearing the full force of its 165-mph winds down upon the southeastern Bahamas and away from the Turks and Caicos islands. Forecasters upgraded their alert for South Florida to a warning.

Updated at 2:15 a.m. ET Wednesday:

The most powerful Atlantic Ocean hurricane in recorded history made its first landfall in Northeast Caribbean islands. The eye passed over Barbuda around 1:47 a.m, according to the National Weather Service.

Updated at 11:10 p.m. ET

"Hurricane Irma has intensified into an extremely dangerous Category 5 hurricane," the National Hurricane Center says, citing the latest data from NOAA and Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft.