Immigration

U.S. Court of Appeals

  A Brazilian immigrant living in Nashua who narrowly avoided deportation earlier this month is still at risk of having to leave the country.

 

Elvecio Viana is 65 and has lived in the U.S. for 27 years, according to his attorney.

 

Robert McDaniel is a litigation lawyer representing Viana. He's filed a motion for a stay of deportation.

 

U.S. Court of Appeals

 

An immigrant from Brazil living in New Hampshire has won a temporary stay from a federal court to block his deportation, hours before he was ordered to board a plane.

The 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston said it needed time to review the case of 65-year-old Elvecio Viana, of Nashua.

Viana's lawyers say he came into the United States 27 years ago on a visa. He recently filed papers for permanent resident status.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

New Hampshire lawmakers in the House held a hearing today for a bill that would restrict access to adult education programs in the state. Senate Bill 525 narrowly cleared the Senate.

 

A crowd of dozens showed up in opposition to the bill and a larger hearing room was needed to accommodate them.

 

Courtesy the Okeny family

  Ageth Okeny fled war in Sudan with her four children. In Egypt, she says she applied for refugee resettlement.

 

“They asked me in interview: ‘You have specific place to go?’ I said no, I just want to leave with my kid[s], I need the safety place to be safe with my children,” Okeny says.

 

“So they brought me here to Manchester,” she says.

 

 


DACA, or "Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals" has been in the news a lot recently, and for the past half year, Congress and the White House have gone back-and-forth over the fate of the Dreamers, debating what to do about their special but temporary immigration status.  We take a regional look at this issue, both political and personal.

NHPR File Photo

  A New Hampshire university is teaming up with two organizations to offer $20 million in scholarships to young immigrants who are living in the country illegally and often have difficulty getting financial aid.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

The New Hampshire Senate Education Committee heard testimony on a bill today that would make certain adult education programs available only to legal residents of the state.

 

Republican Senator Andy Sanborn is the primary sponsor of the measure, which he said will direct funds toward students who can legally work in the state.

 

Judge Again Halts Deportation of Indonesians Living in N.H.

Feb 1, 2018
Ben Henry / NHPR

 A federal judge in Boston is blocking the government from deporting dozens of Christian Indonesians living in New Hampshire while they're given a chance to fight against their removal.

U.S. District Judge Patti Saris ruled Thursday the Indonesians who fear persecution if returned home should be given time to reopen their cases. Saris said they provided "unrebutted evidence" showing they would risk persecution or torture if deported.

The government had urged the judge not to block their removal.

CREDIT U.S. COURT OF APPEALS

Attorneys for a group of Indonesian immigrants facing deportation argued before a federal judge in Boston today for more time.

The group of 51 Indonesian Christians now living on New Hampshire's Seacoast fled religious persecution and overstayed their visas back in the 90s. Then, last summer, under a federal crackdown, immigration officials told them they had 30 days to leave.

Dozens of Indonesians fighting deportation from the United States have won another temporary reprieve in federal court in Boston.

U.S. District Court Judge Patti Saris on Monday rejected the government's argument the court doesn't have jurisdiction in the case. The judge is blocking immigration officials from removing the roughly 50 Indonesians living in New Hampshire while the court considers their bid for a preliminary injunction.

The Keene Public Library is hosting an immigration-related event Thanksgiving morning. 

Organizer Mohammed Saleh hopes locals will take a moment to step away from their celebrations and reflect on how other families might be separated on this day.

It only made sense to choose Thanksgiving, he said, as a day that recognizes the coexistence of immigrants and natives.

A federal judge has ordered the release of an Indonesian immigrant living on the Seacoast and detained by ICE.

Terry Rombot was one of about two-dozen Indonesians who were told by officials back in August that they had 30 days to buy plane tickets and leave the country.

They have been living in New Hampshire for decades after fleeing religious persecution, but they never received any official status.

Instead they had been living under an informal agreement with ICE, where they agreed to stay out of trouble and check in each month.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu met with U.S. Homeland Security officials while in Washington on Thursday to discuss the nearly 70 Indonesians facing deportation from their home in New Hampshire.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/partiallyblind/1164043991/in/photostream/" target="blank">partiallyblind</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

An immigrant from Brazil who lives in New Hampshire and faces deportation Nov. 5 is fighting for his case to be heard, saying federal officials aren't honoring a nearly 15-year-old agreement allowing him to stay in the U.S.

Fifty-eight-year-old Renato Filippi entered the U.S. through Mexico in 2002 with the help of smugglers. He was arrested but says U.S. authorities recruited him to serve as a confidential informant on the people who assisted with his entry. He says he was promised he could stay in the U.S. permanently.

For the better part of two decades, New Hampshire has been home to dozens of Indonesian families who immigrated to the United States fleeing religious persecution. Some of them were denied their applications for religious asylum, and they've spent years checking in with authorities and receiving temporary means to stay in the country. Now, under President Donald Trump, they've been told their time is up. 

This week on Word of Mouth, producer Ben Henry follows one family's journey from Indonesia to New Hampshire to the brink of deportation. 

Courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

U.S. Border Patrol agents arrested eight adults for immigration violations during a three-day checkpoint on Interstate 93 in the town of Woodstock last week.

Customs officials say those detained were from Bulgaria, Ecuador, El Salvador and Guatemala, including two people who overstayed their visas.

In addition, agents seized small quantities of marijuana and hash oil from U.S. citizens during the roadblock, which was coordinated with the New Hampshire State Police.

Ben Henry

New Hampshire's undocumented Indonesian population is taking legal action against President Trump's deportation crackdown. A judge today agreed to halt ongoing deportations for two weeks while the case moves forward. 

Courtesy

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents are again staging an immigration checkpoint on Interstate 93 in the town of Woodstock, New Hampshire, approximately 75 miles from the international border.

In August, Border Patrol agents detained 25 undocumented immigrants, including several minors, during a weekend checkpoint. The majority of those detained were for overstaying their visas.

Thirty legal U.S. residents were also arrested by the Woodstock Police Department for various drug and alcohol related offenses.

USA - NH - New Hampshire State Police
Dave Conner / Flickr Creative Commons

The New Hampshire Division of State Police is reviewing its policies on immigration.

State Police Col. Chris Wagner says right now there is no policy for how troopers should address immigration status during a traffic stop or other encounter.

Wagner says with a national conversation about immigration ongoing, he wants a clear policy in place as soon as possible so that troopers and the public will know what to expect.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 8, 2017

Sep 8, 2017

President Trump’s decision to end the DACA immigration policy could affect as many as one thousand people in New Hampshire.  ICE orders deportation for Indonesian immigrants in New Hampshire.  Manchester became the first community to sue opioid manufacturers and distributors - seeking to recoup money spent battling opioid addiction.  And Portsmouth says no to Keno, as Rochester puts it on the ballot. 


Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

Colleges and universities in New Hampshire are reacting to President Trump’s decision to end the immigration policy known as DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Jonathan McIntosh / https://flic.kr/p/742Wx2

Nineteen Indonesian immigrants living in New Hampshire received deportation orders Tuesday after checking in at federal immigration offices in Manchester.

The immigrants are undocumented, but check in every month with ICE officials.

Maggie Fogarty, co-director of the New Hampshire program for the American Friends Service Committee, said ICE told the Indonesians to return next month with plane tickets showing a November departure.

Fogarty said immigrants who have been complying with regular check-ins are easy targets for deportation.

President Trump’s decision to end the DACA immigration policy could affect nearly 1,000 people here in New Hampshire.

Ron Abramson, an immigration attorney based in Manchester, says he’s been working with clients protected by DACA in the run up to this decision to explore their options.

“We’ve been just trying to prepare people for anything. One approach was to get anything that could be filed, filed before this announcement. As a general rule, having a postmark or delivery date before some policy changes at least gives a person potential rights.”

President Trump’s decision to end the DACA immigration policy could affect nearly 400 people here in New Hampshire.

Ron Abramson, an immigration attorney based in Manchester, says he’s been working with clients protected by DACA in the run up to this decision to explore their options.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Vermont senator and former presidential candidate Bernie Sanders made two stops in New Hampshire on Labor Day.

Senator Sanders started his day at the annual AFL-CIO breakfast in Manchester where he spoke alongside New Hampshire senators Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan.

Ben Henry for NHPR

A group of Indonesians in New Hampshire who are facing deportation went before federal immigration officials Friday in Manchester. Many have lived illegally in the US for years under the supervision of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), but are now encountering tightened immigration policies under President Trump.

Courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

U.S. Border Patrol agents staged a weekend checkpoint on Interstate 93 in Lincoln, New Hampshire over the weekend, resulting in the detention of 25 undocumented immigrants, including several minors.

AP Photo/Matt York

 Earlier this week, NHPR featured the story of nearly two dozen undocumented Indonesian immigrants facing deportation, after having lived in the Dover area for two decades.

During a routine check-in with federal immigration officials earlier this month, they were told to purchase plane tickets, and make plans to leave the country in less than two months, or face detention.

It's a situation immigrant advocates say is playing out in communities across New Hampshire, as the Trump administration’s new, more aggressive immigration enforcement policy takes effect.

Ben Henry for NHPR

Under prior administrations, Christian Indonesian immigrants living illegally in the US were required to check in with immigration officials every few months, but they were not deported. Under President Trump, that’s changing.

Twenty-three Indonesians in New Hampshire arrived at a check-in on August 1st in Manchester and were told they would be deported within a month, to a home country where they fear religious persecution.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

After last fall’s election, New Hampshire's Second District Congresswoman, Ann McLane Kuster, said she hoped to find areas where should could agree with President Trump.

"Absolutely I’ll be looking for common ground. Paid family leave that’s one that I think is important, and obviously infrastructure investment, I think is very significant for the economy. And I think there will be others."

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