Immigration

Ben Henry for NHPR

Under previous presidencies, Christian Indonesian immigrants living illegally in the US were required to check in with immigration officials every few months, but they were not deported. Under President Trump, that’s changing.

Twenty-three Indonesians in New Hampshire arrived at a check-in on August 1st in Manchester and were told they would be deported within a month, to a home country where they fear religious persecution.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

After last fall’s election, New Hampshire's Second District Congresswoman, Ann McLane Kuster, said she hoped to find areas where should could agree with President Trump.

"Absolutely I’ll be looking for common ground. Paid family leave that’s one that I think is important, and obviously infrastructure investment, I think is very significant for the economy. And I think there will be others."

Samantha Fogel

New Hampshire has 50 new Americans calling it home as of today. They were sworn in as new citizens at a ceremony in Manchester Wednesday, representing 27 nations. This is the fifth year for this annual naturalization ceremony. 

Photo via TripAdvisor

A Mexican restaurant in New Boston that was raided by immigration agents this week has shuttered.

La Cabana Mexican Restaurant announced in a Facebook post on Thursday that Immigration and Customs Enforcement had raided their restaurant that morning, picking up half its staff.

The AP confirmed with ICE that two people who had been previously deported from the United States were arrested outside the restaurant.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Nine months ago, Joyce Chance left a refugee camp in Uganda where she had spent the last eleven years. Chance, who was born in Congo, boarded a plane with her two kids, and came to the United States.

A refugee resettlement agency in Concord, New Hampshire picked them up at the airport, and moved them into a one-room apartment.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Manchester Bishop Peter Libasci spent an hour visiting immigrants detained at the Strafford County Jail in Dover on Monday.

The decision to visit the jail came after the Bishop  met with a parish in Manchester on Sunday with many Hispanic congregants. That Parish, St Anne-St. Augustin, had sought to protect undocumented immigrants living in the neighborhood by proclaiming itself a, quote, “sanctuary church.”

The Bishop responded last month with a letter urging Catholic churches against such proclamations.

Courtesy Easterseals NH

Easterseals New Hampshire was trying to fill 280 open positions in Manchester to serve children with physical, neurological or behavioral disabilities. To fill those open positions, Easterseals had to get creative.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

In February, the Trump White House directed immigration enforcement to begin detaining and deporting all unauthorized immigrants. This marked a change from Obama-era directives, telling agents to prioritize deporting individuals convicted of serious crimes.

But how do immigration agents find undocumented but otherwise law-abiding immigrants? New England News Collaborative Executive Editor John spoke with reporters Kathleen Masterson from VPR and Emily Corwin of NHPR about big differences between how the states approach working with Federal Immigration officials.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The number of people detained in New Hampshire by federal immigration authorities since Donald Trump took office was greater than the number detained any of the previous six months. 

josh rogers/nhpr

U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen visited former Iraqi refugee Tamam Mohamad, at the Spice Center market in Manchester to call attention to her opposition to President Trump's new executive order banning U.S. from 6 Muslim-majority countries and freezing all refugee resettlement.

Mohmmad came from Iraq in the late-1990s with $20. He eventually became a citizen and returned to his home country for 3 years as U.S. military interpreter. He says Iraq may not be included in the President’s new executive order, but that doesn’t matter to him.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

President Trump has signed a revised executive order, once again barring travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program.

It's similar to the president's January order that was blocked by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. But this latest order leaves Iraq off the list of barred countries.

The White House cites more cooperation with the Iraqi government in vetting people who apply for U.S. visas. The latest order also specifically states that it does not apply to legal permanent U.S. residents or current visa holders.

Acid Pix via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/8Nphxr

On today's show:

  • Our Civics 101 podcast looks into the process of impeachment
  • "The Best and Worst a Country Has to Offer" from producer Virginia Lora. Listen again at prx.org.
  • Writer Ismail Muhammed talks about his piece: "The Misunderstood Ghost of James Baldwin" - Interview starts at 12:10
  • Tomorrow is the last day of the RPM Challenge. Producer Taylor Quimby checks in on Rob "RC" Thomas as he wraps up his 10 songs. - Interview starts at 26:00

Emily Corwin for NHPR

As immigration officials ramp up deportation of new classes of unauthorized immigrants, more residents and visitors without documents fear run-ins with police.

On New Hampshire's diverse Southern border, a traffic stop in one town could lead to very different consequences than the same kind of stop one town over.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Dartmouth College is joining other Ivy League schools in opposing President Trump’s immigration order.

The Hanover-based school, along with 16 other elite institutions, filed a legal brief in a New York federal court on Monday. The colleges and universities argue that the travel ban, which is currently on hold following a federal appeals court ruling, would harm their ability to attract and educate the world’s best scholars.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As President Donald Trump’s executive order on refugees garners strong reaction from around the country, officials in Durham and Portsmouth have begun discussions about potentially declaring themselves sanctuary cities.

Officials in both communities say they’ve heard from residents about the idea, possibly as part of a coordinated campaign.

Sara Plourde / New England News Collaborative, NHPR

While Republican governors in Massachusetts and Vermont expressed concern over the weekend about President Trump’s recent executive order on immigration and refugees, New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu took a more neutral stance when weighing in on the issue Monday.

The Immigration Order: Impact on the Granite State

Jan 30, 2017
Kitt Hodsden; Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire reaction to the Trump immigration order. We hear from an array of Granite State voices:  politicians who feel this will, in the end, make the state safer.  Immigrants and refugees worried about their families and their futures. Colleges who welcome foreign students.  And major employers from hi-tech to hospitals.

GUESTS:

Amy Markus

(This post will be updated as new information and reactions from New Hampshire officials are made available.)

Emily Corwin / NHPR

New Hampshire Lawmakers filed into the State House cafeteria Thursday for some free international food. Like it or not, their meal came with a side of conversation -- about how immigrants benefit New Hampshire.

Joe Plocki via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/Dgd7R

California newspapers once wrote that Chinese immigrants had "most of the vices and few of the virtues of the African". Until 1940, Asian Americans earned less than whites...and less than black Americans too. All that changed just a few generations.  Today, how Asian Americans became a "model minority."

Then, from unidentified noises to a story of heartbreaking loss, we scour the audio landscape for sound we can't help but share. Morning Edition host Rick Ganley joins us for the latest installment of Overheard.

New England is an old region, and not just by historical standards.

The population here is aging faster than almost any other place in the country. Fewer people are having children, and many of the states struggle to keep younger generations living and working here.

And as New England's baby boomers grow older, and live longer, the need for health care workers also grows.

Ryan Caron King | NENC

It’s hard to avoid the hand-wringing about aging demographics in New England these days. The region's six states have the six lowest birth rates in the country. Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont have the oldest populations in the country, and Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts aren't far behind.

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

Amid uncertainty about the future of the country’s immigration laws under a Trump administration, Dartmouth is trying to reassure undocumented students that they’re welcome on campus — and that the school will try to protect them from potential changes in the law that might be in store.

One New Hampshire City, Two Immigration Stories

Oct 26, 2016

Pam Colantuono and Minata Toure have never met. But they have a few things in common.

They both live in Manchester. They’re both moms. And the biggest thing they share — the thing that shapes both their lives and how they see the world — is the classic American immigration story.


Ted Siefer

It’s been more than a month since an apartment fire in Manchester displaced nearly 20 people, the majority of them refugees from the South Asian country of Bhutan. City officials called the fire suspicious, but they have yet to determine its cause. The fire has raised safety concerns in the city’s refugee community, among the most recent to make a home in Manchester.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The Radisson ballroom was not yet full, and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump would not arrive for almost an hour. Already, the crowd chanted, “lock her up.” Peter Vincello from Raymond was on his way in, with his 15 year-old son.

“He kinda talked me into it. I was actually supporting Cruz in the primary.” But now, Vincello said, “He says all the right things, second amendment, getting the economy back, law and order.”

6.23.16: How We Can Be More Nordic & Citizen Khan

Jun 23, 2016
Valerio Fuoglio via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/dcPCcv

Bernie Sanders’ proposals for free education and healthcare were flatly rejected by those who said "we are not Denmark". A new book argues that the policies and protections in Nordic countries don't work because of shared benevolence, but because they benefit everyone's selfish interests. Today, a Finnish expat gives the US a pep talk.

Then, Zarif Khan migrated to America in the early 20th century and became prosperous and beloved in his Wyoming town...though the law prevented his citizenship.

NPR's Tom Gjelten on America's Immigration Story

Jun 6, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Longtime NPR foreign correspondent Tom Gjelten writes that for most of our history, immigration law favored Europeans. But with the 1965 Immigration Act, the door was opened for people from all corners of the world, ushering in transformation, tensions and a new debate over what it means to be American.

 Federal data shows that the U.S. government has placed fewer than 100 migrant children from Central America who have entered the United States without their parents in Northern New England since the fall of 2013.

The federal government says it has placed 60 unaccompanied minors from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras with relatives and other sponsors in New Hampshire. A total of 24 were placed in Maine, and five were placed in Vermont.

Natasha Haverty

In the 2016 presidential campaign, few issues have been as fiercely debated as immigration. Here in New Hampshire, the US Southern border thousands of miles away can feel like an abstraction. But a small and growing number of voters in New Hampshire take the immigration debate very personally: the state’s Latino community. And as that community grows, so does its resolve to find a political voice. 

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