Immigration

New Hampshire’s Immigration Story includes the stories of many refugees, people who come to the United States because they can't stay in their native countries, due to violence or famine.

Many of those refugees are resettled in Manchester, but the city’s mayor, Ted Gatsas, says that needs to change. He wants a moratorium on new placements to avoid straining city services.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/partiallyblind/1164043991/in/photostream/" target="blank">partiallyblind</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

H-1B visas help employers find skilled workers they can’t find in the US workforce.

Something else that’s hard to come by these days for some businesses is credit.

Turns out there’s a visa program for that too. Foreigners can apply for an EB-5 visa, as long as they agree to invest a half million dollars or more in capital investment project for an American company.

Photo by Canalita0306, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

More evidence that some people are losing faith in American exceptionalism: Chinatowns everywhere are vacating as residents head back home in search of the "Chinese Dream".  Journalist Bonnie Tsui explains the circumstances surrounded the growth and decline of American Chinatowns.

 

LINKS

Bonnie's article "The End of Chinatown"

Manchester Community College has received a grant of nearly 5 million dollars for a worker training program.

As NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown reports the funds come from an unexpected source.

When American companies can’t find the American workers with the skills they need, they can bring in guest workers on a temporary visa.

Applying for that visa costs the employer a lot of money, and the Department of Labor gives that money back in the form of grants to train Americans.

Although we are a nation of immigrants, the first laws to enforce who could be an  American citizen  and who couldn't didn’t appear until the late 1880s.  Since then, new legislation like the Immigration Acts of 1921 and 1965, as well as the Refugee Act of 1980s have both strengthen and loosened these rules.  As part of our year long series "New Hampshire's Immigration Story", we'll talk today about the law, how it’s evolved and ask if it once again needs to be modified?

Guests

Manchester Central is New Hampshire's largest and oldest public high school, and its most diverse. Refugee and immigrant teenagers from nearly 70 countries attend classes at Central. Independent producer, John Rudolph, and the staff of NHPR spent several months gathering the stories of students and teachers to find out what diversity means to them, culminating in the week-long series Culture Lessons.

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