Immigration Law

Word of Mouth
11:55 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Why Private Prisons Don't Want Immigration Reform

Thirty years ago, Corrections Corporation of America opened its first private prison. As demand for border patrol increased over the decades, so has its earnings. Last year, CCA brought in $1.7 billion dollars in revenue – a quarter of which came from government agencies enforcing immigration policy and incarcerating non-citizens in the US. Lee fang is Reporting Fellow with the Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute. He probed the connection between prison profits and stiffer immigration policies and came up with some unsettling answers.

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Word of Mouth
11:55 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Why Private Prisons Don't Want Immigration Reform

Thirty years ago, Corrections Corporation of America opened its first private prison. As demand for border patrol increased over the decades, so has its earnings. Last year, CCA brought in $1.7 billion dollars in revenue – a quarter of which came from government agencies enforcing immigration policy and incarcerating non-citizens in the US. Lee fang is Reporting Fellow with the Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute.

Around the Nation
7:33 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Arizona's Illegal Workforce Is Down, So Now What?

Undocumented immigrants are searched before boarding a deportation flight in Mesa, Ariz., last June. Since the passage of the state's immigration law two years ago, thousands of illegal workers have left.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 5:41 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments next week on the most divisive immigration law in recent memory. Arizona's Legislature passed SB 1070 two years ago, but much of it has been put on hold pending the court's decision.

Still, supporters say the law has achieved one of its stated goals: Thousands of illegal immigrants have self-deported, leaving the state on their own. The real reason — and consequence — of such a demographic shift may be more complex, however.

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Around the Nation
7:57 pm
Thu April 19, 2012

Ariz. Immigration Law Limbo Sees Mixed Results

Tucson, Ariz., police officers work in the city's predominantly Hispanic South Side in May 2010. Since April 2010, when Arizona's controversial immigration bill passed into law, crime in the state has hit a 30-year low. Some attribute this to the law, but others are not so sure there's a connection.
Scott Olson Getty Images

The Supreme Court is about to take up one of this term's biggest cases. Next Wednesday, the court will hear arguments challenging Arizona's controversial state immigration law, known as SB 1070.

Among other things, the law makes it a state crime to be in the country illegally and requires police to question the immigration status of people they stop. Lower courts blocked parts of the law when it was passed nearly two years ago.

But in that time, things in Arizona have been changing.

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