jeb bush

Marc Nozell via Flickr / Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/3MY97U

Donald Trump will head into the Republican National Convention with at least 11 of the delegates from New Hampshire’s Republican State Committee, the state party announced Monday.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Despite a disappointing finish in Tuesday's presidential primary, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush told supporters his campaign is far from over.

"This campaign is not dead," he said after stepping onto the stage at Manchester Community College to thank supporters. "We’re going on to South Carolina.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush campaigned in Nashua on Monday, and criticized the Supreme Court's 2010 Citizens United ruling. 

Bush spoke at an invitation-only Rotary lunch at the Nashua Country Club, where he was asked about what he would do to counter the influence of money in politics.

In a break from other Republicans in the race, Bush expressed disappointment with the Supreme Court's 2010 Citizens United v. FEC ruling and said he would support changing it.

In a year where so many Republican voters are angry at Washington, it can be tough to have two former presidents in your family.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has struggled with that dynamic his entire campaign — sometimes embracing the Bush legacy, and sometimes holding it at arm's length. (The campaign logo is Jeb!, not Bush!)

Jack Rodolico for NHPR

Gary Mountford of New London is exasperated. He likes former Florida Governor Jeb Bush. But there’s a central challenge Bush has faced since he announced his candidacy for president.

"I wish more people were listening," says Mountford.

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It’s illegal to leave a prerecorded voicemail for someone on the “do not call” registry — even if the call was placed by a live caller — according to the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office.

In this year's Republican presidential primary, much has been made about a division between insiders and outsiders. But in New Hampshire, perhaps the most intense battle is happening within that insider group. And as the primary campaign enters its final stage, the fight for the mainstream Republican vote is only growing more intense.

Rebecca Lavoie / NHPR

If you live in New Hampshire's North Country, or along the Vermont border, you’ve probably had a chance to meet the candidates. But that was then. Now, two or so weeks from Primary Day, the action is all down south.

In Bow, Bush Calls For Higher Ed Overhaul

Jan 24, 2016
Brady Carlson / NHPR

It's a busy weekend in New Hampshire for Republican presidential candidates. Among those on the trail this weekend: Jeb Bush. 

NHPR file photos

With every day that passes leading up to the New Hampshire primary, the pressure builds on Republican presidential hopefuls looking to make a splash here.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Republican president candidate Jeb Bush has scored the endorsement of South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham.

A spokesperson for the Bush campaign said Graham will announce his endorsement later Friday.

Graham has been a coveted endorsement for candidates running for the Republican nomination since he holds major clout in South Carolina, one of the critical early voting primary states.

 

Kate Harper for NHPR

 

Jeb Bush says he misjudged the intensity of anger among Republican voters before his White House campaign. He says the country in 2016 is "dramatically different" than in past elections.

But in an interview with The Associated Press, the former Florida governor insists he's still a viable candidate. And he says he's broadened his mission in 2016 to include defending conservativism from GOP front-runner Donald Trump.

Bush tells the AP, "I just think it's important to fight this fight. I don't know what the consequences politically for me are."

Jason Moon / NHPR

Three Republicans hoping for a big showing in the New Hampshire primary -- Jeb Bush, John Kasich and Marco Rubio -- were busy locally this week. The three are also angling for many of the same voters as Primary Day approaches. NHPR caught up with them in Derry, Bedford and Meredith.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

New Hampshire’s heroin and opioid epidemic has become a front-and-center issue on the campaign trail – prompting presidential candidates from both parties to answer question after question about what they’d do to fight addiction on a national level.

Many Republicans may have sided with Donald Trump's controversial proposal to ban Muslims from entering the U.S., but his rival Jeb Bush predicts that the GOP faithful will eventually oppose the plan and see it his way.

"Trump clearly banning all Muslims would actually be so counterproductive in our efforts to destroy ISIS that it's foolhardy," the former Florida governor told NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview Wednesday in Boston. "I mean, it's beyond ridiculous; it's quite dangerous."

It all started with a question about food labeling at the Iowa Agriculture Summit earlier this year and Jeb Bush's not-so-humble brag:

"When I go to Publix in Coral Gables after church to go prepare for Sunday Funday in my house ... I'll probably make a really good guacamole and I want to know where that avocado is from and I want to know where the onions are from and the cilantro and all the secret stuff I put in it."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A day after chiding the media for, as he put it, allowing Trump to play them like a violin, it was Jeb Bush who decided to bring up the real estate mogul, during a panel discussion with young professionals.

Bush was asked by a name two historical figures and one celebrity he'd invite to a party. His answer came immediately.

"I would not invite Donald Trump."

Winston Churchill and Neil Armstrong would be welcome at his party, said Bush, but it was a firm no thanks on the celebrities.

"I really don't believe in celebrity. I find it superficial."

Compared to some of his rivals, Marco Rubio hasn’t been seen much in the Granite State, either in person or on TV.

That’s about to change.

josh rogers/nhpr

Jeb Bush says the federal government needs to allay public concern over refugee resettlement and chastised president Obama for “demonizing” people who disagree with him on refugee resettlement. 

Bush, who earlier said the U.S. should focus its efforts on resettling Christian refugees from the middle East,  now says resettlement of all refugees from Syria should pause until current policies could be strengthened.  

The superPAC backing Jeb Bush seemed to have everything it needed. It went into the primaries with the most money by far. Right to Rise USA had raised $103 million by June 30, with plenty of help from Bush before he officially announced his candidacy and could no longer legally ask for big contributions.

In September, Right to Rise put the money to work, announcing it would buy $24 million worth of TV ads in the first three nominating states: Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Bush began his day at Founders Academy charter school in Manchester, where he outlined his vision of what makes a great leader to a room full of students.

“My guess is, one of the great attributes of successful presidents is that they’re humble. They have humility. They recognize that it’s not all about them, it’s about having a servant’s heart and trying to fix things.”

It is hard to overstate the importance of New Hampshire for the presidential hopes of Jeb Bush.

He entered the year as the clear frontrunner. Now, after months of unfocused answers in interviews, unimpressive performances in the three GOP debates, and a general lack of enthusiasm on the campaign trail, he's in the middle of the pack in polls and stunned to be looking up at the likes of Donald Trump and Ben Carson.

Jeb Bush's presidential campaign is attempting a reset of sorts. Lackluster debate performances, low poll numbers, a mounting number of gaffes on the trail, and accusations — from Donald Trump specifically — that he's low-energy have left him in a rut.

Jeb Bush went straight to New Hampshire after Wednesday night's Republican debate. That's where the former Florida governor needs a strong showing if he is to remain a contender for his party's nomination and where he's now working to reignite a campaign seen as sputtering.

The large sign that hung above Jeb Bush's head during his New Hampshire campaign stops read "Jeb Can Fix it." It was intended to refer to Washington, but to GOP voters like Larry Eller, who turned out to see Bush at a Geno's Chowder Shop in Portsmouth, the first thing Bush needs to fix is how he's campaigned.

Ventura County Democratic Party / Flickr/CC

From Adams to Kennedy to Bush and Clinton, our guest Stephen Hess says that politics as the “family business” is nothing new. In his book, he profiles eighteen of these political clans: how power passes on, how it can be lost, and why many Americans are so uncomfortable with this concept. 

GUESTS:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Credit Kinder Morgan / http://www.kindermorgan.com/content/docs/TGP_Northeast_Energy_Direct_Fact_Sheet.pdf

It's one of the more, shall we say, parochial questions presidential candidates have faced on the campaign trail this year: What do you think of the proposed gas pipeline that may be routed through New Hampshire?

The pipeline is officially known as the Northeast Energy Direct Project.  And the question of whether it should run through the southern part of the state has been posed to a number of both Republicans and Democrats, including Jeb Bush. 

Republicans in Congress and on the campaign trail call for an Obamacare repeal all the time. Plans to replace it are rarer, though. Obamacare is a fantastically complicated policy, and overhauling the health care system would likewise be a complicated business, affecting not only government spending and the economy, but people's very lives on an intensely personal level.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush told an audience at St. Anselm College  he'd use tax credits to help people purchase insurance and eliminate mandates created by the Affordable Care Act.

Jeb Bush derided the sweeping health care law act as written "by special interests for special interests," and said reducing federal control over the health care system would lower health care costs and encourage local innovation.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush's energy levels have been an ongoing topic of conversation during the presidential campaign — probably much more than Bush would prefer.

Rival Donald Trump has repeatedly needled Bush for bringing a "low energy" to the campaign trail, even posting a fake advertisement on Instragram offering Bush as a sleeping aide.

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