Cities and Counties Take Action on Minimum Wage

Sep 8, 2015
Pyogenes Gruffer / Flickr/CC

Recently, cities and counties have taken the lead on mandating much higher pay for traditional low-wage jobs, instead of waiting for the states or the federal government.  Supporters say these increases are long overdue and only fair, but others warn of unintended consequences, including job losses and cutbacks in hours.


photologue_np via flickr Creative Commons


The New Hampshire Employment Security Agency is hosting a job fair in North Haverhill on Thursday.

It's going to be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the North Haverhill Town Office.

New Hampshire's unemployment rate held steady in June at 3.8 percent. That's down from 4.3 percent in the same month last year, and is lower than the national June average of 5.3 percent.

A variety of employers are expected to attend the job fair, representing such fields as health care, veterans resources, staffing agencies, manufacturing, government, and others.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr / Creative Commons

Several times a year New Hampshire Employment Security releases short-term forecasts on jobs. For the period of late 2014 through late 2016, the state expects 14,197 new jobs, which would be a gain of two percent for the period. The forecast says job growth is expected in every sector of the economy and in nearly every job category.

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Social media has killed nostalgia, and iPhones are ruining summer camp. On today's show, we explore how social media has replaced that shoe box in the closet that keeps the past hidden and contained. Then, machines take over for humans and slog through the dirty work, leaving people free to do whatever they choose in a world without work. We talk about what a post-job society might look like, and how we might prepare for it. But meanwhile, the number of older Americans working is on the rise.

Just about anything can be outsourced these days from customer service to personal tax filing, but what if you need help with a creative project, say a radio story? We asked NHPR's Sean Hurley to relinquish his creative control and utilize a website called Fiverr, an online marketplace where people offer a wide range of services starting at just five dollars.

Karen Dalziel via flickr Creative Commons /

Ever heard of Philip Glass the plumber?  Kurt Vonnegut the car salesman?  On today’s show we pay homage to artists who didn’t quit their day jobs, even after hitting the big time, like poet/banker T.S. Eliot.

We'll also talk with pioneering jazz vibraphonist Gary Burton, he’s won seven Grammy awards and played alongside music legends from Stan Getz to B.B. King. Despite these accomplishments, he knows he won’t be remembered for a great solo, instead he’ll always be the guy that played with four sticks.

Vinoth Chandar via flickr Creative Commons /

What happens to our minds when we have too little, and how does that shape our choices and behaviors? On today's show, we'll talk to a pair of Princeton professors who set out to answer those questions. Plus, the inspiration for our Good Gig series was a conversation with a person who has one of the most unique gigs on the planet: sketch artist for the U.S. Supreme Court.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments. 

Good Gig: Spotify Browse Editor Rob Fitzpatrick

Jan 28, 2015

Initially we contacted Rob Fitzpatrick to talk about the series he's been writing for The Guardian, "101 Strangest Records on Spotify", but when we found out what he does for a living, we realized we had a real Good Gig on our hands. The job title "Browse Editor" for Spotify was not one we'd heard of before, but now we all want that job! Getting paid to listen to music seems like the best kind of job.

Stephen Cole via flickr Creative Commons /

From 9 to 5 to The Office, we’ve got plenty of examples of cookie-cutter cubicles where workers toil away in soul-crushing boredom and fatigue. On today’s show, we flip the script and hear a defense of office life. 

Print media circling the drain, record and film companies battling piracy, the rise of cheap, reality TV: while some sectors have bounced back from the recession, creative industries seem to remain in peril. A former arts reporter ponders the decline of the creative class and what society loses when artists can’t make a living.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Poverty Under A Microscope In N.H.

Jan 13, 2015
UK in Hungary / Flickr/CC

Following up on our homelessness show yesterday, we’re looking at the broader issue of poverty in New Hampshire.  While the state has one of the nation’s lowest poverty rates, it doesn’t always do well on certain measures, like childhood poverty. We’re looking at the latest numbers, and some of the efforts to address the issue.


Lyanne Guarecuco / Flickr/CC

A recent survey shows Americans rank finding balance between our jobs and lives beyond work as a top priority, but that overall we’re doing a poor job achieving that.  We’re looking at this conundrum, and exploring the notion that perhaps we do in fact have more leisure time than we think, especially compared with earlier eras.

This show is a rebroadcast that originally aired on 9/3/14.


Good Gig: Color Expert Lee Eiseman

Oct 22, 2014

Good Gig is a series of conversations with individuals who have landed their dream job.

10.12.14: The Wonderful World Of Books

Oct 10, 2014
MorBCN via flickr Creative Commons

Today’s show is all about the wonderful world of books, starting with the U.S. Senate Handbook, a 380 page document of sometimes confounding rules intended to keep Senate offices running smoothly. Then, we’ll speak to an antiquarian bookseller about the beauty and obsession of rare books. And actor and comedian Bob Odenkirk discusses his debut collection of writings, A Load of Hooey.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Good Gig: Rare Books Dealer Ken Gloss

Oct 8, 2014

Good Gig is a series of conversations with individuals who have landed their dream job. 

We're kicking off the series with Ken Gloss, the proprietor of the Brattle Book Shop in Boston, one of the largest--and oldest--antiquarian bookshops in the country. He has also been an appraiser of rare books and manuscripts for The Antiques Roadshow since 1998.

Robots And The Future Of Work

Oct 7, 2014
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As computers and robotic machinery grow more sophisticated, there are concerns that automation is making it harder for human workers to compete. But others say robotic workers will lead to better jobs, more productivity, and even an age of leisure for humans. We’ll hear from the experts on how the rise of the robot may change the face of the workforce.

This program was originally broadcast on 8/21/14.


9.1.14: The Job Show

Sep 1, 2014
Adam Fagen via flickr Creative Commons

 This is a re-broadcast of the Job Show which originally aired on April 9, 2014.

Johnny Paycheck famously sang, “Take This Job and Shove It.” In this economy? Not so fast. Today’s Word of Mouth is all about jobs.

Find out what happens when salary negotiations go a step too far, plus, a wholly unglamorous portrait of a freelance writer trying to make it in the big city. We’ll also talk to someone who has a very unique job: the official sketch artist for the Supreme Court.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments. via Flickr CC

  While me may not remember classmates’ names, or the books we read, there’s something about school lunch that stays with us long after graduation. Today, Word of Mouth investigates the content of children’s brown bag lunches, and discovers they’re not always healthier than cafeteria fare.  Then: a growing number of young Americans are lowering their vocal registers. We’ll look at the speech pattern known as vocal fry, and find out why women who speak with a creak have worse job prospects than their higher-register peers.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

N.H. Unemployment Rate Unchanged In July

Aug 12, 2014

New Hampshire’s unemployment rate remained unchanged last month, at 4.4 percent.   At the same time last year, it was 5.2 percent.   But the state’s Employment Security office reports the number of Granite Staters in the workforce shrank by 2,550 people from June.  And 310 more people were unemployed.   Nationally, the jobless rate went up slightly, to 6.2 percent.

N.H.'s Economy: Back On Track?

Aug 11, 2014
Congressman Frank Guinta / Flickr/CC

Both at the national level and in New Hampshire, several signs suggest the economy is on the mend, with a stronger job market, firmer consumer confidence, and more generous lending among banks.  Still, some experts warn this recovery is incomplete, with troubling factors such as slow wage growth and international turmoil.


Market Basket CEO Ouster Brings Protest

Jun 24, 2014

Market Basket employees from New Hampshire are among those heading to a Massachusetts rally protesting the removal of longtime Market Basket president Arthur T. Demoulas.

Cody White works at a Market Basket in Concord.

White: We probably have like, ten employees going down to the rally right now to go show our support for Artie T., who is the leader of Market Basket. The board members are trying to get him fired, essentially—so we have a lot of support, and there’s even more from all the other stores.

6.23.14: Get A Job

Jun 23, 2014
mrdorkesq via flickr Creative Commons

Confucius said, "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." In this economy? How about just finding a job and keeping it? Today’s Word of Mouth is all about jobs. Find out what happens when salary negotiations go a step too far, plus, a wholly unglamorous portrait of a freelance writer trying to make it in the big city. 

jacashgone via Flickr Creative Commons

By Alexis Chapin and Molly Donahue.

We explored the world of the obsolescence, from CDs and 8-tracks to Atari games and trains, and why these things often leave us nostalgic. Listen to the full show here.

But technology isn’t the only thing that becomes obsolete over time. Jobs also disappear over time as they are replaced, usually out of efficiency or lack of demand. We’ve compiled a list of some of the most interesting jobs that have gradually vanished over the years.  


Make a lunch date today with your loyal friend, Word of Mouth. We're revisiting some favorites from the last year, and our nostalgia is set to max capacity. Kicking off the show are two stories about farming. In space. Then hit the juke box and press play for a segment on the origin of 'cool'. Speaking of cool, Chris Ballew of the band The Presidents of the United States of America talks about his family friendly musical persona Caspar Babypants. Then, the internet can provide a place for venting about Ventis. Wrapping up the show, Producer Zach Nugent shares his latest picks for The Audio Orchard.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Courtroom Sketch Artist: Art Lien

Apr 9, 2014
Art Lien, All Rights Reserved /

Many jobs are becoming extinct in the digital age, and the role of the courtroom sketch artist is becoming a lost art. As more and more courtrooms embrace cameras as a way of sharing the intimate details of real life courtroom drama, the charming and beautiful sketches that used to be a way of life for many artists are a thing of the past.

Sketch artist Art Lien spoke to Virginia about his long career as a sketch artist in courtrooms across the country and his main beat, The Supreme Court of the United States.

Film's Greatest Workplace Freakout Scenes

Apr 9, 2014
jason saul via flickr Creative Commons

Jobs - amiright?! Sometimes they can seem like a necessary evil. And sometimes that evil trumps necessity, leading to some pretty gnarly workplace freakouts. Folks in the film industry must have had some especially unpleasant job experiences, because movies are rife with workplace freakouts. We've compiled the best of film's freakout scenes, and remember - most are NSFW due to language. Jobs.

MMBOB / Flickr Creative Commons

Upon first glance, the numbers look good, the U.S. jobless rate now sits at 6.6%, a full 1.6% better than last year. But dig deeper into those numbers and you find a different story: currently 4 million Americans have been out of work for more than half a year, and in New Hampshire that makes up nearly 32% of the jobless. But now, the stress of long-term unemployment is being felt even more as the extensions usually given after 6  months were dropped in December leaving 1,300 in New Hampshire and nearly 2 million nationwide without benefits.

LendingMemo / Flickr Creative Commons

Just many places across the country, the New Hampshire’s recover from the recession has been slow. Recently, though, many are pointing to signs of an upswing. Housing prices are going up, while foreclosures are going down.  Consumer confidence is better than it has been in a while, and unemployment is now at 5.1% - 11th best in the country. But all is not perfect:  many in the Granite State worry about high energy costs, the Affordable Care Act’s effect on business, and uneven progress in different regions of the state.

Thirteen unemployed and underemployed people from New Hampshire and Vermont will soon be taking jobs with Dartmouth-Hitchcock as medical coders.  Today they graduate from an innovative cross-state program.

mandiberg via flickr Creative Commons

Every day, the internet is inundated with more information, and more data to be to be categorized, organized, scrubbed, and filed away in a timely manner. Millions of miniscule tasks need to be performed each day to keep things running smoothly. Computers can do some of this mind-numbing work; other tasks are done piecemeal by hundreds of thousands of people for almost no money; Amazon Mechanical Turk is a marketplace for this kind of work. Ellen Cushing is staff writer for The East Bay Express, she wrote about the work called “micro-tasking,” which pays a pittance, drawing comparisons to working in a sweatshop.

Nine New Hampshire companies will share more than $100,000 in state Job Training Fund grants awarded this month.