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Town meeting voters in Bethlehem have rejected a plan to expand a North Country landfill. 


The Casella-owned facility serves a large part of the region and is on track to fill up by 2021. 


Jim McCann was one of about 600 Bethlehem residents who voted against the expansion proposal, with about 500 residents voting for it. This is the second year in a row the matter has been up for a vote.  McCann says he wants to see his small town diversify its economy, not invest in the landfill.


Courtesy Woody Little / Toxics Action Center

Environmental groups say they plan to sue a Bethlehem landfill owner for allegedly dumping contaminants into the Ammonoosuc River.

The news comes just days before a Town Meeting vote on a plan to expand the site.

Vermont-based Casella Waste Services is dismissing the threat as a political stunt.

The announcement came from two Boston-based nonprofits – the Conservation Law Foundation and the Toxics Action Center, where Woody Little is an organizer.


New Hampshire officials say they will address a landfill that is leaching potentially cancer-causing chemicals into groundwater sources.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Michael Wimsatt, director of the state Department of Environmental Services' Waste Management Division, believes the migration of contaminants from the Coakley Landfill is unacceptable. Wimsatt says removal of contaminants or containment on the site is necessary after receiving a letter from concerned state lawmakers.

EPA Superfund Records Collections

The federal Environmental Protection Agency has agreed to test water for possible PFC contamination near the Coakley landfill in southeast New Hampshire.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Gov. Maggie Hassan said it's her understanding that the EPA has committed to testing areas around the landfill in Rye and North Hampton and is finalizing a plan for such testing.

The state of New Hampshire has approved an expansion to a landfill in the town of Bethlehem.

The Caledonian Record reports the application by North Country Environmental Services was approved with 17 conditions last week by the state Department of Environmental Services.

In this expansion, 8 acres would be added to the current 38-acre landfill and its lifespan would be extended by five to 10 years.

Residents have a 30-day window to appeal the DES approval.