Jack Rodolico

Manchester is getting a $2.9 million grant from the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development to remediate lead hazards in 175 housing units.

While this is the fourth time the Queen City has received the federal grant, the announcement from Senator Jeanne Shaheen's office comes on the heels of a new state law aimed at educating families about lead hazards, and as one of the state's largest landlords faces a lawsuit over lead contamination in a Manchester apartment complex.

Jack Rodolico

Shaghaf Mohammed has seen too much in her 11 years. Her family fled Iraq in 2013. And when they left, they never could have guessed the battle they’d face in their new home in Manchester. Shaghaf’s four-year-old sister, Aleel, is sick with lead poisoning.

Jack Rodolico for NHPR

A new state law aims to boost the number of children screened for lead poisoning. There's good reason New Hampshire is aiming for that goal.

Children aged 0-6 are the most likely to suffer permanent health and cognitive damage from lead exposure. Yet in 2013, New Hampshire tested a mere 16.5 percent of children in this age group for elevated blood lead levels. That's concerning because 62 percent of New Hampshire's houses were built before 1978 - the year the federal government cracked down on lead paint.

Eric Fleming

One of New Hampshire’s largest landlords, Brady Sullivan Properties, is under scrutiny from city, state and federal regulators for lead contamination in one of its buildings in Manchester. 

Sara Plourde / NHPR

In recent months, tenants of Manchester's Mill West complex have been complaining of construction-related lead dust in their apartments. The building's developer, Brady Sullivan Properties, has faced scrutiny from state and municipal health agencies over the issue. Compiled from news reports, interviews with regulators, and tenant correspondence, the timeline below tracks the developments in this ongoing story.

Jack Rodolico

The Environmental Protection Agency is taking action against Brady Sullivan Properties because of lead contamination.

The order demands Brady Sullivan clean up a mixed commercial and luxury apartment building in Manchester by July 15, and lays the groundwork for EPA to potentially fine or sue the landlord.

In May, Brady Sullivan hired a contractor to do sandblasting in Mill West, a converted mill. The contractor didn’t have the proper permits, and spread lead dust into more than three-quarters of the apartments above.

Brady-Sullivan Properties

Twenty Manchester residents are suing one of New Hampshire’s largest landlords for lead contamination in their apartments.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

  Labor Day was one of the last days customers had to move their stuff out of Extra Space Storage, a self-storage facility in Manchester.

The Manchester mill building that contained the storage company was purchased a developer called Brady-Sullivan, which has  plans to convert the building into luxury condos. The closure came a lot earlier than expected, however, after lead dust was detected in the storage units in January during renovations on the upper floors.  

Dennis Amith via Flickr CC

A new study from the US Geological Survey estimates that as many as 80,000 people in Southeastern New Hampshire could be drinking water from wells with unhealthy levels of contaminants.

The study finds nearly 50,000 people could be drinking elevated levels of arsenic, nearly 15,000 with manganese, and fewer than 10,000 could be consuming either high levels of uranium and lead.

Simon Bowen

E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: What are “ghost factories?”                                           -- Philip Walker, Hartford, CT

Boing Boing Science Editor Maggie Koerth-Baker has tracked trending scientific evidence that suggests leaded gasoline was the primary catalyst for national fluctuations violent crime, IQ, and ADHD.

Flkr Creative Commons / KeithCarver

For some Granite Staters the loon represents the state in a very emotional way, and supporters of the bird were out in force on Tuesday, defending a bill that would ban lead fishing gear. The bill was being heard by the House Fish and Game Committee, and attendees over-flowed out the door of a double capacity hearing room.