Literature

Word of Mouth
12:06 pm
Thu October 4, 2012

What Color was Christ?

angelofsweetbitter2009 via Flickr Creative Commons

If you grew up in a religious home with a portrait of Jesus on the wall, he was probably portrayed as brown-haired, brown eyed, and Caucasian.  But have you ever wondered why a Judaic man born in the Middle East would look like an aquiline-nosed Northern European?  Edward J. Blum is a professor of history at San Diego State University, and along with Paul Harvey, is author of “The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America".  

Word of Mouth
2:27 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

Bringing Back Noir...for the Tablet

gix_0

For many, the noir genre lived and died in those smokey, black-and-white films and pages of dog-eared pulp fiction in the mid 20th centuryNow, a Kickstarter project led by long-time magazine veterans Nancie Clare and Rip Gorges aim to give the noir genre the digital age treatment, with video, animation and rich media.  Also with us is Megan Abbott, author of

Poetry
3:01 am
Tue April 17, 2012

A Poem Store Open For Business, In The Open Air

Poet-for-hire Zach Houston works at the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market in San Francisco. Houston says he is paid about $2 to $20 for each poem.
Ralph Wiedemeier NPR

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 9:43 am

Zach Houston runs his Poem Store (on any given sidewalk) with these items: a manual typewriter, a wooden folding chair, scraps of paper, and a white poster board that reads: "POEMS — Your Topic, Your Price."

Houston usually gets from $2 to $20 for a poem, he says. He's received a $100 bill more than once. The Oakland, Calif., resident has been composing spontaneous street poems in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2005. Five years ago, it became his main source of income.

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Word of Mouth - Segment
11:03 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Rethinking Frankenstein

 Mary Shelley’s gothic novel, Frankenstein has long been read as a cautionary tale about the limits of technology, and a warning against scientific hubris. The monster is a man-made creation run amok, seeking revenge on the scientist that harnessed electricity and brought him to life…a horror recreated many times on film.

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Three-Minute Fiction
12:01 am
Sat March 10, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction Round 8: She Closed The Book...

Luis Alberto Urrea was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for nonfiction in 2005.
Nicole Waite Little, Brown & Co.

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 11:06 pm

Ready for some creative competition? Weekends on All Things Considered is launching Round 8 of its Three-Minute Fiction contest. Here's what we look for: original, short fiction that can be read in less than three minutes — that's no more than 600 words.

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Best of Public Radio - Feb 18
11:54 am
Mon February 13, 2012

Langston Hughes - I Too Sing America

Photo: Jack Delano Library of Congress

Langston Hughes, an enduring icon of the Harlem Renaissance, is best-known for his written work, which wedded his fierce dedication to social justice with his belief in the transformative power of the word. But he was a music lover, too, and some of the works he was most proud of were collaborations with composers and musicians.  Hosted by Terrance McKnight, WQXR host and former Morehouse professor of music, I, Too, Sing Americawill dive into the songs, cantatas, musicals and librettos that flowed from Hughes’ pen.

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Word of Mouth - Segment
11:09 am
Tue February 7, 2012

A Panther’s Perspective

Photo by ALA, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Jamal Joseph’s story is unlike many taught in schools during Black History Month. His long list of identifiers includes orphan, activist, FBI fugitive, convict, a drug addict, urban guerilla, and Black Panther. In a speech he made in the 1960s, Jamal urged students to burn down Columbia University. He is now a professor there and a writer, filmmaker, Oscar nominee, youth advocate, drug counselor, and father.

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