local food

ilovebutter via Flickr CC

With the arrival of warmer weather comes a yearning to plant - and eat - fresh vegetables. But if you're looking for some locally-grown veggies before your garden gets going, a farmers market can be just the ticket.

Increasingly, farmers markets are offering much more than the green goods, with vendors offering fresh baked bread, soaps, crafts, and other locally-made food and home products. Some markets are even showcases for live music, crafts, and art.

Sheryl Rich-Kern for NHPR

Whole Foods opened its first New Hampshire store in Nashua last month. It plans to add stores in Bedford and Portsmouth by 2016.

It’s an open question whether the Texas-based chain known for high-end natural and organic products can compete with farmers markets on the one hand and with the reopened Market Basket, or the grocers that saw their business grow as the Demoulas family feuded.

Boscawen Community Kitchen Survey Underway

Aug 1, 2014
Emily Corwin, NHPR News

A New Hampshire college student's proposal for a community kitchen in Boscawen is in line to undergo a USDA-funded feasibility study.

A community kitchen would provide farmers and entrepreneurs with access to processing, packaging and storing facilities. For smaller enterprises, the access to such a facility would mean a chance for expanded production and profits.

Michael Samuels

 

An on-campus eatery makes sustainability a learning experience.

The 2014 Locavore Index again ranks New Hampshire's local food system as one of the strongest in the country, rating third behind Vermont and Maine.

Martin Langeveld of Strolling of the Heifers, the Vermont organization which produces the Locavore Index, talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about how New Hampshire's food system is growing and changing.

Canterbury Passes Looser Farmstand Regulations

Mar 12, 2014
Farmers Mkt Produce
USDA

Regulations on farmstands in Canterbury will be loosened.  Two-thirds of residents voted in favor of the measure on Tuesday. 

Classic Thanksgiving Dishes, Right In Your Backyard

Nov 27, 2013
Shannon Dooling for NHPR

The traditional thanksgiving feast includes turkey, potatoes, cranberries and of course, pie. Some of the foodies from NHPR’s newsroom traveled around the state to find more on the local producers and traditions of holiday fixings. 

Thanks to Shannon Dooling, Emily Corwin, Sam Evans-Brown and Todd Bookman for these stories, which first aired last November.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

 Most of our Thanksgiving tables will be filled with turkeys, carrots and cranberries that have traveled from all over the country – and even the world – before making their way to our forks. But at a recent Thanksgiving celebration organized by Slow Food Seacoast, ingredients in every dish were harvested no more than 25 miles away. To see how one goes about shopping for an all-local Thanksgiving menu, we headed to a winter farmers’ market.

The indoor farmers’ market in Rollinsford feels bigger than a football field, and is teeming with vendors and buyers.

Michael Samuels

In the fields, at farmer's markets, in food pantries and schools, gleaners are proving there's plenty of local fruits and vegetables to go around.

Harriet Alexander

Increasing demand for local food has led farmers to seek capital: funds with which to start or grow their businesses.   In most industries, an increase in demand from consumers spells profits, so banks and other lenders will pull out their checkbooks.  But farming is a little different.  In New England, farmers aren’t actually likely to make much money.  This isn’t new: farmers have always relied on farm credit co-ops and the federal government for loans to grow their businesses.

Michael Samuels

Now is the time for fresh, local corn, and farm stands are doing a brisk business as summer comes to an end.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

With almost 60 farmers markets across the state, demand for local food is growing.  But local farmers still struggle to make a profit growing local food. In fact, about three quarters of all farms in New Hampshire gross less than $10,000 from sales each year. Seacoast Reporter Emily Corwin takes an in-depth look at New Hampshire's agriculture community in her five-part series, Growing Pains.

The Nottingham Farmers Market will be the site of a so-called ‘vegetable mandala' today.  Traditionally, mandalas are intricate geometric designs used in Buddhist practice.  But in Nottingham, visitors will buy or bring their own local produce to a table and artistically arrange their donations to create a large-scale design. 

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Farm-to-table has become increasingly popular among people looking to eat local.

But a dinner series in Nashua takes that concept a step further, by connecting people directly to local farmers and the food they produce.

Chef Sergio Metes carefully pulls a large pan out of the oven.

He takes off a sheet of aluminum foil, releasing a wave of steam.

Monadnock Food Co-op Named Best Start-up

Jul 22, 2013
Rose Kundanis

The recently opened Monadnock Food Co-op in Keene has just won a national startup of the year award from the Food Co-op Initiative. The Co-op opened for business April 3 with a Grand opening weekend in June.

For the last three months shoppers like Allison Aldrich have been picking up farmer produced foods at the Monadnock Food Co-op.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

With almost 60 farmers markets across the state, demand for local food is growing.  But local farmers still struggle to make a profit growing local food. In fact, about three quarters of all farms in New Hampshire gross less than $10,000 from sales each year.

This is the first installment in our summer business series investigating how a changing market place is affecting New Hampshire farmers.

Lost Albatross via Flickr Creative Commons

Backyard chicken raising is one of the fastest-growing facets of the local food movement. Cities and towns have been reforming land-use and health policies to accommodate raising chickens…a hobby many picked up after the 2010 outbreak of salmonella that led to the recall of 500 million eggs.

Ryan Lessard

Hundreds of first-time beekeepers across the state are anxiously awaiting their first shipment of honey bees this week. NHPR’s Ryan Lessard reports on the growing popularity of the hobby and what it could mean for the pollinating insects’ struggle for survival.

Image via eatmedaily.com

Wander the aisles of your favorite grocery store and you’re likely to see produce marked as locally grown, meat that is trumpeted as grass fed and hormone-free, and canning kits to help you preserve your own garden’s bounty. The explosion of these products has largely been credited to the femivore movement, which has many women returning to the kitchen.

Flikr Creative Commons / Kaiscapes Media

Farm-to-School programs are expanding across New Hampshire, according to a new report, but the cost of local food is still a barrier for many schools.

Stacey Purslow of New Hampshire Farm-to-School says the number of farms selling food to schools has tripled to 60 over the last three years. She says schools are buying a wider variety of products.

Purslow: We started out with apples in New Hampshire but now they get tomatoes, and cucumbers and lettuce, and corn and broccoli, and cabbage and potatoes and eggs and maple syrup and beef.

Photo by Manual Crank via Flickr Creative Commons

Carol Leonard is considered one of the forerunners – or foremothers – of the modern midwifery movement. She was the first midwife certified to practice legally in New Hamsphire back in 1982, and has since delivered more than 1,200 babies safely in their homes.  That story is covered in her memoir, “Lady’s Hands, Lion’s Heart: A Midwife’s Saga.”

Sam Evans-Brown

 

The cold, dark New Hampshire winter is tough on vegetables, and vegetable growers. Farmers race the frost in the fall and chomp at the bit in the spring waiting for snow to melt. But  a federal grant program has been changing the way that some Yankee farmers grow food.