local food

Word of Mouth
11:09 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Is Michael Pollan Sexist?

Credit Image via eatmedaily.com

Wander the aisles of your favorite grocery store and you’re likely to see produce marked as locally grown, meat that is trumpeted as grass fed and hormone-free, and canning kits to help you preserve your own garden’s bounty. The explosion of these products has largely been credited to the femivore movement, which has many women returning to the kitchen.

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Education
3:00 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

More N.H. Farmers Selling To Schools

Flikr Creative Commons / Kaiscapes Media

Farm-to-School programs are expanding across New Hampshire, according to a new report, but the cost of local food is still a barrier for many schools.

Stacey Purslow of New Hampshire Farm-to-School says the number of farms selling food to schools has tripled to 60 over the last three years. She says schools are buying a wider variety of products.

Purslow: We started out with apples in New Hampshire but now they get tomatoes, and cucumbers and lettuce, and corn and broccoli, and cabbage and potatoes and eggs and maple syrup and beef.

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Word of Mouth
11:04 am
Thu May 10, 2012

How To Eat A Beaver

Photo by Manual Crank via Flickr Creative Commons

Carol Leonard is considered one of the forerunners – or foremothers – of the modern midwifery movement. She was the first midwife certified to practice legally in New Hamsphire back in 1982, and has since delivered more than 1,200 babies safely in their homes.  That story is covered in her memoir, “Lady’s Hands, Lion’s Heart: A Midwife’s Saga.”

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Environment
4:51 pm
Thu April 12, 2012

Federal Grants Help Farmers Produce Fresh Greens in Winter

Reed and Hank Letarte take row covers off the winter greens in their "cold house"
Sam Evans-Brown

 

The cold, dark New Hampshire winter is tough on vegetables, and vegetable growers. Farmers race the frost in the fall and chomp at the bit in the spring waiting for snow to melt. But  a federal grant program has been changing the way that some Yankee farmers grow food.

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