Maine

New England Snapshot
3:54 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Battle Over South Portland Tar Sands Ordinance Not Over Yet

An oil tanker makes its way into the harbor in South Portland.

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 5:38 pm

When South Portland Mayor Jerry Jalbert announced the 6-1 vote to approve a measure that will block the loading of raw crude, including Canadian tar sands oil, onto tanker ships in the southern Maine city, residents and supporters, who had filled the community center, rose to their feet and gave the City Council a standing ovation.

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New England News
4:10 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Maine Fire Investigators Partnering With Four-Footed Helpers - Arson Dogs

Justin Davis of the San Antonia Fire Department, with his arson dog Kai.

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 5:42 pm

Arsons accounted for more than 150 fires last year in Maine. They killed three people, injured more than a dozen and caused more than $4 million worth of property damage. The state Fire Marshal's Office investigates thousands of fires a year to determine which are crimes, and increasingly relies on arson dogs to help with the investigations.

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All Things Considered
4:40 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

200-Year-Old Ellsworth Estate Frozen in Time

Joshua Torrance is director of the Woodlawn Museum and Gardens, an estate in Ellsworth that's frozen in time.

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:41 pm

This summer, we're taking a road tour, looking at some of the museums, attractions, and hidden gems around the state.  Today we travel to Ellsworth, where an historic house stands virtually untouched since its last occupant passed away in the 1920s. 

George Nixon Black left no descendants, but he worked all his life to preserve his family's Woodlawn Estate - the gardens, the home and its top-notch furnishings. Here, you can see a nearly 200-year-old home frozen in time through three generations of an Ellsworth lumber family. 

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New England Snapshot
5:09 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Maine Marine Animal Rehab Center Releases Last Seals Before Closing

A harbor seal, the same kind as the five seals that were released today in Biddeford.

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 6:21 pm

At 7:00 tonight, five seals will emerge from kennels and flop across a Biddeford beach into the ocean. It will be the final release of rehabilitated seals from the University of New England's Marine Animal Rehabilitation and Conservation Center. UNE announced last month the center would close due to financial constraints and a shift in programming. Those who rescue stranded marine animals say they're scrambling to figure out how to continue helping animals in distress.

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New England Snapshot
2:10 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

Maine DEP Withdraws Formaldehyde Rule Proposal, Dismaying Environmentalists

Nail polish is one of the many household items which may contain formaldehyde.
Credit Emre Kanik via Flickr CC

Say the word "formaldehyde" and you can practically smell it. The pungent preservative is associated with everything from nail polish and hair straightener to embalming fluid and fetal pigs. But it's also an ingredient found in a wide array of household items, such as glue, floor finish, paper and baby care products. 

"The whole point of the Kid Safe Products Act is to give Maine parents the right to know which toxic chemicals or cancer-causing chemicals are in everyday products," says Mike Belliveau of the Environmental Health Strategy Center.

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New England Snapshot
4:58 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Maine Highway Signs Bill Draws Wide Opposition

Lawmakers in Maine are joining business owners and local officials in speaking out against a bill they say will hurt tourism in towns across the state.

The measure would remove nearly a third of the signs on Maine highways that direct motorists to secondary locations.

Officials with the Maine Department of Transportation and the Maine Turnpike Authority, which support the bill, say the law needs to be changed for Maine's interstates to comply with federal highway sign standards.

New England Snapshot
4:44 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Adrenalin Flows at Maine Arm Wrestling Championships

The ancient sport of arm-wrestling is enjoying a surge in popularity.

A record number of people from across the Northeast - most, but not all of them, bulky males - turned out over the weekend for the Maine State Arm Wrestling Championships at a sports bar in South Portland.

With nearly 150 pumped-up competitors - some of them world champions, some of them beginners - there was no shortage of adrenalin.

New England Snapshot
5:42 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Bowdoin Exhibit Explores Racist Images Spawned by Anti-Slavery Novel

An exhibition of controversial images and objects associated with Uncle Tom's Cabin is on display at Bowdoin College in Brunswick - the town where Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote much of the groundbreaking mid-19th century novel. With its anti-slavery message, the book is often credited as one of the factors that helped bring about the Civil War. The novel also spawned a wealth of spinoff musical shows, stage productions and images portraying African-Americans in what could be considered a racist light.

New England Snapshot
4:43 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Maine Considers A State-Run Virtual School

Lawmakers in Maine have been looking recently at virtual learning. For-profit charter school operators have proposed two virtual learning charters.

But a bill this year would create a state-run online school first, before allowing for-profit charters to set up shop.

Visit MPBN's website to read or hear Jay Field's report.

NH News
4:43 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Shoe Company Cole Haan Moving To New Hampshire

Credit B.C. Angell via Flickr Creative Commons

Leather shoes and accessories manufacturer Cole Haan is moving its headquarters from Maine to New Hampshire.

Officials said on Friday that the headquarters will relocate from Scarborough, Maine to Greenland, N.H., where its customer service and distribution center is located.

Karen Martin, executive director of the Scarborough Economic Development Corp., tells the Portland Press Herald that about 110 people work at headquarters.

The company didn't disclose when it plans to relocate or how many employees would be affected.

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Word of Mouth
12:15 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Lobster's Journey From Trashy Food To Fancy Feast

Credit The Vault DFW via Flickr Creative Commons

As the summer winds down, so will demand for lobster and its market price. Maine lobstermen are bemoaning low wholesale prices, but far from shore, say New York City’s Lobster Joint, market price today for a roll is $19…a boiled lobster will cost your $34. Today, the crustaceans are coveted, and symbolic of wealth, class, and extravagant living. Not so long ago, lobster was considered lower than the ocean floor on which it dwells. Here to trace its climb up the social ladder from grub for the poor to high-class delicacy is Daniel Luzer, Web Editor at the Washington Monthly. We found his article, “Low Lobster Got Fancy,” in Pacific Standard.

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Word of Mouth
10:49 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Breaching The Veazie Dam To Restore A Habitat

More than 300 excited spectators gathered to watch the breaching of Veazie Dam.
Credit Meagan Racey, USFWS via flickr

On July 22nd, bulldozers breached the Veazie dam in Eddington, Maine – an 830 foot strip of concrete that had separated the Atlantic Ocean and the Penobscot River for a century.  It was an effort undertaken by an unlikely coalition of conservationists, fishermen, power companies and others, who came together to help restore 1000 miles of endangered Atlantic salmon habitat. Brian Graber is director of the river restoration program at American rivers, one of the partners behind the project.

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Word of Mouth
11:07 am
Mon April 8, 2013

The Burgess Boys

Credit via indiebound.com

Shirley Falls, Maine is one of those New England towns with a strong memory of the way things used to be…before the mills closed, before the mall went up across the river…before so many residents moved away. It’s the fictional town left behind by a pair of brothers in The Burgess Boys, a new novel by Elizabeth Strout, who won the Pulitzer prize for fiction for Olive Kitteridge. The story centers on Jim and Bob Burgess, brothers whose lives are imprinted by a childhood tragedy in very different ways. Both pull up their stakes and secret miseries and move to New York City….and both are pulled back to their hometown by another family crisis. Elizabeth talks to Virginia about the book and it's connection to Maine.

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Word of Mouth
10:01 am
Thu October 25, 2012

A Sudsy CSA

Credit David Clow via Flickr Creative Commons

In Maine, consumers can buy dairy products, meat, fish, eggs and organic produce via a growing array of subscription-based, community supported agriculture programs. CSAs encourage customers to pay a farmer or fisherman up front in exchange for weekly shares of, say, shrimp or mixed vegetables. As Jay Field reports, microbrew lovers on the Blue Hill Peninsula will soon be able to buy their beer the same way.

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Word of Mouth
10:59 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Doing Whatever It Takes...

Sara Hallie Richardson by Robbie Kanner

The unsteady path of an artist is never an easy one. Especially in today’s ambiguous economy, the choice to reject a  steady paycheck or conventional job is all the more difficult to justify. One Portland, Maine-based songwriter has made that conundrum into a source of inspiration. Zach Nugent takes us on a radio field trip to meet Sara Hallie Richardson.

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