meals on wheels

Sean Hurley, NHPR

Among the groups in New Hampshire expressing concern over President Donald Trump’s proposed budget are local providers of the Meals on Wheels program.

Meals on Wheels services are administered by local organizations all over the country and is not a federal program. But those local providers receive a varying, but substantial amount of money from the federal Department of Health and Human Services. President Trump is proposing to cut that agency’s budget by 18 percent.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

  U.S. Rep. Carol Shea-Porter is holding a roundtable discussion in Somersworth to highlight her opposition to proposed cuts to the Meals on Wheels program.

The popular service that provides food to the elderly faces a sharp funding cut under President Donald Trump's budget proposal. The exact size of the cut is unknown, but White House budget director Mick Mulvaney said the government "can't spend money on programs just because they sound good."

Giving Matters: A Hot Meal and a Warm Smile

Sep 12, 2015
Rich-Kern; NHPR

St. Joseph Community Services provides Meals on Wheels to residents in need in Hillsboro County. David Gilmour is a retired physician who has been delivering meals for more than a decade.

Sheryl Rich-Kern

As lawmakers in Concord continue to work through the budget process, funding for the Meals on Wheels program has been in the middle of the House and Senate’s differences.

The House budget included a 50 percent reduction to payments that in part fund the program.  Last week the Senate’s fiscal committee restored $10 million in funding for in-home services, including Meals on Wheels.  But it’s far from a done deal—the full Senate has yet to vote on it and lawmakers have until the end of June to approve a budget.