Media

We’re starting 2013 with a big story in New Hampshire media – the owners of the Nashua Telegraph, the second largest daily in the state, are putting that newspaper up for sale.

GoKicker.com

A 2007 study by Harvard University found that the rank and file of “Generation Y” is consistently less engaged and less knowledgeable about current events than their elders. Former New York Times editor and entrepreneur, Holly Ojalvo, is looking to staunch the growing tide of current events ignorance.  She’s the founder and editor-in-chief of GoKicker.com, a website that’s adapting the news cycle for the 35-and-younger set.

Sebastian Hillig via Flickr Creative Commons

Every Google search, every saved photograph, streamed song, text message and each stroke of the e-mail send button is served and stored on a digital infrastructure that is – to the end user – invisible.  The New York Times has spent a year investigating the tens of thousands of data centers that support the information industry, and discovered a secretive, power-sucking infrastructure sharply at odds with its sleek, e

A special broadcast of NPR's Talk of the Nation: Science Friday host Ira Flatow, recorded in front of a live audience at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.  

In part one, Flatow talks about the declining state of science coverage in the news, and his hope that new media will be the new outlet for spreading the gospel of science. In part two, I sit down with Flatow and we talk about his career, the challenges of expanding online platforms, and address questions form the audience. 

Mike Huckabee fell short four years ago in his quest to become the Republican presidential nominee. As of this week, the former Arkansas governor has a new job: national radio talk show host.

The Mike Huckabee Show started Monday with an anticipatory flourish.

"Welcome to the community of conversation. You've just made a right turn, and you've arrived at the corner of conservatism and common sense," he said. "In this show, we're going to be confronting the issues — not the listeners."

"Paintballing With Hezbollah Is The Path Straight To Their Hearts," says the headline at the Vice.com newssite.

In a quest to get to better know members of the Hezbollah militia in Lebanon, four Western journalists and a former U.S. Army Ranger last year arranged to play paintball in Beirut with some men who said they were among the group's fighters.

First of four parts

Ultimately, all roads lead home for Rupert Murdoch.

"The story of our company is the stuff of legend: from a small newspaper in Adelaide to a global corporation based in New York, with a market capitalization of about $44 billion," he said last October, when he addressed a News Corp. shareholders meeting in Los Angeles.

Australians view the company's history differently.

Hearing about golf these past couple of years has turned into some sort of dual universe. On the one hand there is the real world, like: "Smith and Jones Tied for Lead in Cat Food Open."

But then, in more detail, the larger shadow story reads: "Tiger's Putter Falters, Trails By 12 Strokes."

Golf has become like fantasy football or Rotisserie Baseball. Only, imagine if everybody has the same guy — Tiger Woods — on his team. No other golfers seem to exist, except possibly The Ghost of Jack Nicklaus.

(Screenshot of "Reyhan as part of a 'Trendy Couple' by Jenny Pfeiffer" by Rebecca Lavoie)

We’ve heard the story over and over again in these hyperconnected digital times…boy meets girl, they fall in love, become blissfully partnered until one day, girl finds boy’s photo on a dating web site

That’s just what happened to our next guest… but here’s the twist,  Reyhan Harmanci’s boyfriend had no idea his photo was on display for a universe of single women,  even though he had, in fact, given permission for it to be posted there…sort of.

Rapid growth in the U.S. Hispanic community has created another boom — in Hispanic media. In recent months, several major media players have announced plans to join the competition for the Hispanic television audience. There's a new Hispanic broadcast TV network coming, plus a host of new cable channels aimed at Latinos.

The numbers tell the story: According to the census, the U.S. Hispanic population jumped by more than 40 percent in the past decade. The nation's 50 million-plus Hispanics now make up 16 percent of the TV-viewing public.

Part 1: "This is what democracy looks like!" 

In the 1990’s, Brini Maxwell became a household name…at least in Manhattan, where the show dominated public access cable airwaves. The character was the alter ego of actor Ben Sander, a prototypical, pre-feminist, 1960’s homemaker…in drag. If Brini was emblematic of the gay counterculture media at the end of the twentieth century, 2003 brought a whole new brand of gay TV to the air…

Petitions have been a common form of protest throughout modern history, at times bringing attention to causes through little more than handwritten letters and word of mouth.

But like a lot of other things, petitions are going viral. And one website in particular has contributed to the phenomenon.

Change.org offers tools to let individuals start their own online campaigns, a way to bring instant awareness to issues that range from the environment to human rights.

Social media meets old media:

Saying that he's convinced "the demand for long-form, quality journalism is strong in our country," Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that he's buying The New Republic.

That's a magazine, as Steve says, which is four times older than its new owner. Hughes is 28.

Their marriage may be over, but singers Jennifer Lopez and Marc Anthony have come together for a new TV show that seeks out talent from throughout Latin America. It's been airing on Spanish language TV in the U.S. and in 21 countries. And as NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports on today's All Things Considered, the show will also premiere on Fox this weekend, with English subtitles.

As the phone hacking scandal that roiled his father's international news company deepened, James Murdoch is stepping down as Executive Chairman of News International.

The AP reports that News Corp., owned by James' father Rupert Murdoch, said he was stepping down "to focus on the company's international TV business."

We'll have more on this story as it develops.

Update at 9:28 p.m. ET. Murdoch's Statement:

At newsstands across France on Wednesday, readers will delight to a humorous broadsheet published every four years on leap day.

At news shops in Paris and around France, readers look forward to their copy of La Bougie du Sapeur every Feb. 29. Published since 1980, the satirical journal is now in its ninth edition. Its title, which translates as "sapper's candle," is taken from an old French comic-book figure who was born on that fateful last day of February.

Modern computer games and their fast-paced graphics require an incredible amount of computing horsepower. So much, in fact, that the kinds of chips commonly used for gaming are now being built into some of the world's fastest supercomputers.

If you're a serious gamer, if realistic, detailed graphics get your pulse racing, you should write Jen-Hsun Huang a thank-you note.

With less than two weeks to go before Russia's presidential elections, the country's independent journalists are in a state of anxiety. Government-run media seem more open than ever to divergent viewpoints — but officials may be cracking down on independent outlets that go too far.

Two incidents last week suggest that the Russian government is prepared to lean on journalists — both domestic and foreign.

NPR's Michele Kelemen is a former employee of Voice of America.

Russian anti-corruption crusader Alexei Navalny has been the victim of many dirty tricks by pro-Kremlin media.

But when the U.S. government-funded Voice of America published an online interview that had him criticizing other Russian opposition figures, Navalny quickly tweeted that the interview was a fake.

"It seems the VOA has gone nuts," he wrote to his Twitter followers.

Syrian troops have fired rockets and mortars at neighborhoods in the city of Homs that have most fiercely resisted the government throughout the uprising.

Mainstream journalists are barred from entering Homs, so a team of activists decided to record the offensive themselves. The activists positioned their cameras atop buildings in the city. Each morning the view is blue sky, a minaret, a sea of rooftops. Then come the booms.

 The Stop Online Piracy Act now in front of Congress – and its Senate counterpart bill, the Protect IP Act, or PIPA, are both stirring up vigorous debates in political, media and  IT circles.

Photo by Ulterior Epicure via Flickr Creative Commons

 A warning to vegetarians and vegans, this segment is about meat. And fish. And foul. Take coffee-crusted elkstrap, pheasant marsala, or country-fried antelope...yup, gourmet game.

Colin Kearns is deputy editor of Field and Stream Magazine, and editor of the Wild Chef column and blog, where such recipes are shared with hunters and consumers of all things hunted. 

 

We sit down with NPR Media correspondent David Folkenflik. He’s the guy who covers the latest from the news business from the New York Times and Fox News to individual bloggers and small-town papers. And, at times, Folkenflick’s had to report on the blemishes at his own organization.

Guest:

  • David Folkenflik: NPR Media correspondent.
Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is comic value. The long-running NBC comedy series "The Office" is about a group of workers employed by a fictitious paper company.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW "THE OFFICE")

(Photo by dhammza / off via Flickr Creative Commons)

GalleyCat's Jason Boog talks about Amazon's foray into the publishing biz with some major authors signing on. And Alyssa Rosenberg, culture critic and contributor to The Atlantic, talks about how campaigns on shows like Glee compare to real-life political races.

Jay Cox / Flickr Creative Commons

Produced by Chris Cuffe

Alyssa Rosenberg is the pop culture blogger for thinkprogress.org.  She joins us to review this season's political stories on television, and explain who does it best and why.

Links:

 

Ben McLeod / Flickr Creative Commons

A group of teachers from St. Paul's in Concord trades hall-passes for instruments after school.  Two members join us to talk about the art of finely-aged Rock N'Roll.

Links:

We sit down with NPR Media correspondent David Folkenflik. He’s the guy who covers the latest from the news business from the New York Times and Fox News to individual bloggers and smalltown papers. And, at times, Folkenflick’s had to report on the blemishes at his own organization.

Guest:

  • David Folkenflik: NPR Media correspondent.

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