Medicaid Expansion

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

On Wednesday the House will take up one of this session’s most significant pieces of legislation – whether to continue the state’s Medicaid expansion program another two years. One of the biggest hurdles supporters of the bill have to overcome on the floor this week relies on the measure’s work requirements.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

"On the Political Front" is our weekly check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A key House committee voted to support reauthorization of the state’s Medicaid expansion program for another two years. Under the bill, the state's insurance premium tax, along with hospitals and insurance companies, will have to cover the costs of the program that will no longer be paid for by federal dollars next year. For hospitals and insurers alone, that comes to about $24 million each year, starting in 2017.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

As the New Hampshire legislature debates whether to extend expanded Medicaid, house lawmakers continue to question whether the state will get a return on its investment. After two days of work sessions, the House Finance Committee heard its final testimony Wednesday before its scheduled to vote.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

House lawmakers continue to examine how New Hampshire would pay for Medicaid expansion for another two years. On Tuesday GOP leaders on the finance committee were again looking for a guarantee that if passed, private insurance rates will not increase.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

After having a 7-day vacation, lawmakers will return to Concord this week. The full Senate will be meeting on Thursday to take up more than 40 bills. Meanwhile the full House won’t come back until next Wednesday.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Dozens of people filled the House Finance Committee room Wednesday to hear testimony on whether to continue the state’s Medicaid expansion program. Many of those who spoke said they support the program, but some argued its costs will fall to people with private health insurance. Related: NHPR's primer on Medicaid expansion

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The New Hampshire House Finance Committee on Wednesday will take up a bill seeking to continue the state’s expanded Medicaid program for another two years.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Although the full House will not be meeting this week, lawmakers still have their hands full working through dozens of bills in committee.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Gov. Maggie Hassan will give her last State of the State address Thursday at 1:30 at the State House.

The two-time Governor will finish up her term in November as she pursues a U.S. Senate seat against incumbent Republican Kelly Ayotte.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

As the sunset for New Hampshire's Medicaid expansion approaches, state legislators are debating how best, or whether, to extend the program. And while the prospect of dropping 47,000 Granite Staters who receive this coverage is daunting, some lawmakers are worried about how to fund it when federal support decreases.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Newly confirmed New Hampshire Health and Human Services Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers spent part of his first official day on the job lending his support to a plan to extend the state’s Medicaid expansion another two years.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Discussions over the future of New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion kick off in earnest this week, setting the stage for one of the biggest policy debates before state lawmakers this year.

The question of whether to reauthorize the expansion, known officially as the New Hampshire Health Protection Program, has loomed over the State House for much of the last year.

NHPR

 

Republican lawmakers' plan to continue Medicaid expansion in New Hampshire includes work requirements for people receiving the insurance and proposes a way to pay for the state's share of the program without charging taxpayers.

Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley will outline the proposal Wednesday alongside several advocacy groups in advance of a public hearing the next day.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Republican leaders in the New Hampshire House and Senate say they’re willing to consider reauthorizing the state’s Medicaid expansion after its sunset date at the end of 2016 — as long as they can find someone to help foot the costs.

On Monday’s edition of The Exchange, House Speaker Shawn Jasper said it doesn’t seem politically feasible to expect him to pass a plan that requires more public spending.

2016 State House Look Ahead: Legislator Roundtable

Jan 11, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're sitting down with lawmakers to find out what's in store at the State House this year. 

Checking Up on the Affordable Care Act in N.H.

Dec 15, 2015
Morgan / Flickr/CC

As another health insurance enrollment period comes to end, the conversation continues about whether or not the affordable care act is working for individuals and employers in the state. We take stock of who's getting insured, what's on the horizon for Medicaid expansion, and whether the economics of the law are bringing down costs as intended. 

 

GUESTS:   

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In three weeks the House and Senate will return to Concord for a new legislative session and although election year sessions are typically quiet affairs, next year could prove an exception. 

During this session come January, lawmakers will have their hands full with two issues in particular: the opioid crisis and whether to continue the state’s expanded Medicaid program.

Daniel S. Hurd

 

With a battle looming over Medicaid expansion, supporters say the state's ability to tackle the drug abuse crisis will suffer if the program ends.

More than 40,000 people are insured under the Medicaid expansion program, which began in 2014. Unlike traditional Medicaid, it covers substance abuse treatment and recovery programs. But the program is set to expire at the end of 2016 if lawmakers fail to reauthorize it.

Garrett Vonk

  The number of uninsured people showing up in New Hampshire emergency rooms continues to drop _ a trend hospital officials attribute to the state's expanded Medicaid program. 

Under the plan lawmakers passed last year, adults making less than 138 percent of the federal poverty limit _ about $15,900 a year _ are eligible for Medicaid. More than 39,000 have signed up since enrollment began July 1. 

NHPR / Josh Rogers

It’s Monday morning. NHPR’s Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition to discuss developments on NH’s political front.

Lots of political activity over the weekend Jeb Bush, Scott Walker and Ted Cruz all paying their respects to local Republicans. House budget writers busy. Let’s start with presidential politics.

rad(ish) labs via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire's health and human services commissioner says he is confident that the federal government will allow the state's expanded Medicaid program to proceed as planned.

The state is awaiting federal approval for a waiver needed to continue the plan passed by the Legislature last year. That plan calls for using federal Medicaid funds to buy private health coverage for adults making less than 138 percent of the federal poverty limit — about $15,856 a year for a single adult.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A legislative committee overseeing implementation of the Affordable Care Act in New Hampshire may be taking on new duties.

State Sen. Jeb Bradley, a Republican from Wolfeboro, is sponsoring a bill to increase the powers of the joint health care reform oversight committee to include the state's newly-expanded Medicaid program. The bill would require the committee to provide oversight, policy direction and recommendations for legislation.

Alex Proimos via Flickr CC

Gov. Maggie Hassan says more than 20,000 people have signed up for health coverage under New Hampshire's newly expanded Medicaid program.

New Hampshire's previous Medicaid program covered low-income children, parents with non-disabled children under 18, pregnant women, older residents and people with disabilities. The expansion adds anyone under 65 who earns up to 138 percent of federal poverty guidelines, which is about $15,900 for a single adult.

Health care coverage has begun for more than 10,000 New Hampshire residents who've signed up under the state's newly expanded Medicaid program.

Enrollment opened July 1 for coverage that started taking effect Friday. Gov. Maggie Hassan says 10,405 have signed up so far, or about a fifth of the estimated 50,000 adults who are eligible.

Adults making up to 138 percent of the federal poverty limit are eligible for coverage either through the state's managed care program for Medicaid or through a program that subsidizes existing employer coverage.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Roughly 9,400 people have enrolled for coverage under the state’s Medicaid expansion program, which is set to launch Friday.

Since enrollment opened on July 1, nearly a fifth of the 50,000 low-income Granite Staters expected to qualify for coverage have successfully signed up.

Speaking at Lamprey Community Health Center in Nashua on Monday, Governor Maggie Hassan calls that a good start.

An unexpected surge in Medicaid enrollments during the past six months is putting pressure on the state’s budget.

Medicaid has seen its enrollment jump by roughly 11,000 people since January 1. State officials attribute this to two main things: under the Affordable Care Act, there’s a streamlined application process, and that increased publicity surrounding the law brought out more applicants.

Health and Human Service Commissioner Nick Toumpas says it’s more than they expected, but that nearly 70% of the new sign-ups are children.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

Enrollment in Medicaid for as many as 50,000 newly eligible residents opens tomorrow, with health benefits slated to start August 15th.

Governor Maggie Hassan held a kick-off event on Monday at the Manchester Community Health Center, where she called the bi-partisan deal to expand the state’s Medicaid program the most significant health care legislation in decades.

New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion program finally has a launch date. Coverage for an estimated 50,000 low-income recipients will start August 15, with an enrollment period beginning July 1.

“The bipartisan New Hampshire Health Protection Program is a historic step forward for the health and economic well-being of New Hampshire families, businesses and communities,” writes Governor Maggie Hassan in a statement announcing the new timeline.

Residents earning up to 138% of the federal poverty level, or about $16,000 a year, are eligible for the program.

What's New With The Affordable Care Act In N.H.

Jun 16, 2014
Taylor Shaw-Adams / Flickr/CC

Expanded Medicaid for low-income adults is coming, but may be delayed.  Meanwhile, four more insurance companies say they’re ready to join New Hampshire’s marketplace for coverage next year.  And as we head into this fall's elections,  the health care law remains a major point of political contention. 

GUESTS:

  • Todd BookmanNHPR’s health reporter
  • Jenny Patterson - health legal counsel at the New Hampshire Insurance Department

CALLOUTS:

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