mental health

THOMAS FEARON

The Executive Council voted unanimously today to allow Dartmouth-Hitchcock Hospital to mange care at the state psychiatric hospital for the next three years.

THOMAS FEARON

The Executive Council is slated to vote Wednesday on a contract between the state hospital and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Hospital. The vote comes as an independent investigation gets underway about a former patient's suicide. 

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

A group of local and national advocates are calling on the federal government to investigate whether it’s unjust for people with a mental illness, who haven't been convicted of a crime, to be treated in a prison.

New Hampshire is one of only a few states that transfers individuals with a violent mental illness to the Department of Corrections, and it’s been doing so for more than three decades.

7.21.16: Finding Music After 40 & Sleepover Podcast

Jul 21, 2016
eldeeem via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/gXijFE

A new study has confirmed a sad truth about our listening habits - people stop discovering new music around age 33.  Today on Word of Mouth, a seasoned music editor offers tips on how not to get stuck listening to the songs you loved in high school for the rest of your life.

Update: N.H.'s Struggling Mental Health System

Jul 17, 2016

The state is behind schedule in expanding the types of community-based mental health services that keep people out of hospitals and other institutions. The timeline for developing those services was laid out in a $30 million class action lawsuit settlement in 2014 that alleged New Hampshire was violating the civil rights of people with mental illness. We check in on statewide efforts to improve the state's mental health system, what data tells us about the situation, and goals for implementation going forward.


Thomas Fearon

Here is the scathing conclusion from a report about New Hampshire’s struggling mental health system: “The time for patience…is over.”

   A new 10-bed mental health crisis unit is open at New Hampshire Hospital after almost a year of delays.

The unit opened Tuesday in Concord and will admit people over age 18 for stays of three days or less. One goal is to reduce pressure on emergency rooms that are often left caring for patients when beds aren't available at the New Hampshire Hospital, the only state-run psychiatric hospital. On Tuesday, 23 people were on the hospital's waiting list.

THOMAS FEARON

  

The Executive Council has voted 5-0 to allow Dartmouth-Hitchcock to take over managing the state psychiatric hospital in Concord, June 30. But a core group of psychiatrist staff refuse to work with Dartmouth-Hitchcock. 

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

New Hampshire is taking a step toward setting up a more coordinated system to help children with behavioral health needs.

On Monday, the governor signed into law a bill calling for a top-to-bottom review of what behavioral health services are available to kids in New Hampshire, how they’re delivered (in schools, in the community and elsewhere), and how to make sure separate agencies are working together to get kids the care they need. 

Thomas Fearon

An ongoing staffing skirmish at New Hampshire Hospital threatens to create a backlog in the state’s already fragile mental health system.

The conflict pits one of New Hampshire's most esteemed medical institutions – Dartmouth-Hitchcock Hospital – against one of the most specialized psychiatric teams.

Casey McDermott / NHPR

State leaders recently joined the medical and mental health community to launch  "Change Direction NH," part of a national initiative to raise awareness of mental health disorders and  eliminate the stigma around these issues.  Long considered an afterthought to physical well being, mental health has gained recognition as having equal importance, although it's still not easy for many to discuss or seek help. Change Direction NH attempts to fix that, promoting awareness of the signs of mental illness.  Still, challenges remain, including access to treatment.  


Casey McDermott, NHPR

Former New Hampshire Supreme Court Chief Justice John T. Broderick has spoken openly about his son’s mental illness, and his family’s difficulty getting him the help he needed.

Now, Broderick is one of many state leaders speaking up to promote open conversations around mental health. 

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The state plans to streamline its mental health and substance abuse programs for children. 

iStockphoto

When it comes to helping children with problems like anxiety, depression or substance abuse, a lot of people become part of the decision-making process. There's often  the local school district, primary care doctors, and community health workers -- and sometimes even the courts or DCYF. 

At times, a child can get lost in the middle. A bill this session aims to change that by making sure all the parties involved work together to reduce costs and improve outcomes for kids.

www.ratehospitals.com

An inpatient psychiatric unit in the Monadnock region will close because of staffing issues.

The move at Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene takes effect July 1. 

Hospital officials say a nationwide shortage of psychiatrists has limited their ability to treat patients - while the unit is licensed to treat 12 adult and six adolescent patients, staffing issues have meant they've only had an average of three to four adults a day. 

Jack Rodolico

There is this monthly meeting that is typically as bureaucratic as it sounds: the Governor’s Commission on Medicaid Care Management. But last month, things were different. A group of mothers were there to testify with their children in tow. 

Grappling With Homelessness in New Hampshire

Jan 12, 2016
Jeff / Flickr/CC

It's a question Granite State communities are grappling with, as progress appears to have stalled on finding housing for homeless people. Advocates agree a dearth of affordable housing exacerbates the problem. But there's debate over whether providing temporary shelter can forestall lasting solutions on such challenges as unemployment and substance abuse.

Courtesy NH House of Representatives

New Hampshire is falling behind on several of the requirements from the landmark mental health settlement it reached in 2014, according to the latest report from an outside reviewer who’s evaluating the state’s progress.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire will receive a big influx of federal dollars to treat addiction and mental illness.

The state will get up to $30 million a year for five years total. And for example, this year it would mean about an added 25 percent on top of what the state has budgeted for mental health and addiction.

That's a big gain for the state says Steve Norton, the executive director of the New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Services.  But the devil's in the details: like how the money will be spent and how any new services will be evaluated.

After months of scrutiny for abuse and neglect, this residential facility for people with brain injuries and developmental disabilities closed. We're following up on an investigation by NHPR and the radio program Reveal about the history of the center, its connections to similar facilities nationwide - and what this means for a vulnerable population.

 

This program was originally broadcast on 11/18/15.

Guests:

NHPR Staff

After being forced by a lawsuit to spend more on mental health, New Hampshire is winning praise from a national advocacy group for increasing funding and passing bills in 2015 aimed at giving people better access to care.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness on Tuesday released a report tracking state spending and legislation on mental health that shows New Hampshire is one of 11 states that increased mental health funding every year since 2013.

Special Broadcast: An NHPR and Reveal Investigation

Nov 11, 2015
Anna Vignet for Reveal

We're broadcasting this month's episode of Reveal, an investigative news program from the Center for Investigative Reporting.

You can hear the episode and read the accompanying story right here,

Patrick Lanigan via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/7nCt6r

Donald Trump is praised as “authentic” because he speaks without a practiced politician’s filter.  Meanwhile, pundits knock Hillary Clinton for not putting on a good enough show of authenticity – so, what does that actually mean? And politics is not the only arena where the meaning of authenticity is open to interpretation - what about food? Today we take a look at the myth of authenticity – in politics…cooking…and the internet. Plus, forgery in the art industry is not rare - but a con artist who has been caught and never sent to jail is. We’ll speak to the directors of a film that looks inside the mind of the mischievous shut-in and skilled artist who donated masterful forgeries to more than 46 museums. 

Paul Townsend via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/vyKPHC

Harvard, like other prestigious Ivy League schools, is a non-profit. Still, its 36-billion dollar endowment is bigger than the GDP of Jamaica. So why does it remain tax free? Then - meditation, sitting, mindfulness: whatever you call it, it’s springing up everywhere, from Google’s corporate offices to high school classrooms in the Bronx. But can techniques developed to help hospital patients really improve the lives of low-income students? We find out why mindfulness has a place in the classroom. Plus, music industry insiders clamor to predict and announce the summer’s most popular hit – but what about the song of the fall?  We’ll discuss the qualities that make up a classic autumnal anthem. 

9.15.15: Mindfulness in Schools & The Song of the Fall

Sep 15, 2015
Fuzzy Gerdes via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/77kTqw

Meditation, sitting, mindfulness: whatever you call it, it’s springing up everywhere - from Google’s corporate offices to high school classrooms in the Bronx. But can techniques developed to help hospital patients really improve the lives of low-income students? Today, why mindfulness has a place in the classroom. Plus, music industry insiders clamor to predict and announce the summer’s most popular hit – but what about the song of the fall?  We’ll discuss the qualities that make up a classic autumnal anthem. 

mas-concorp.com

As a new school year gets underway, more New Hampshire high schools are looking for ways to help students dealing with mental health issues.

Exeter High School is introducing new mental health services this year, in response to a rise in students dealing with issues such as depression and anxiety.

Jim Tremblay, principal of Exeter High School, joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the program.

When did you realize this was something the school needed to do?

THOMAS FEARON

 

The ongoing state budget stalemate means a 10-bed mental health crisis unit at New Hampshire Hospital won't open as planned this fall.

New Hampshire has been working to improve its mental health infrastructure since settling a lawsuit with the federal government in late 2013 over inadequate services. The 2014-2015 state budget included money to build the new crisis unit, but money to hire staff and operate the unit was set to be included in the 2016-2017 budget that Gov. Maggie Hassan vetoed.

Michael Coughlin / Flickr/CC

We talk with author Pete Earley, whose book “Crazy” examines how prisons and jails have become warehouses for people with mental illness. Earley describes his own struggle to help his bipolar son avoid incarceration, as well as the wider mental health system of a “revolving door” between hospitals and prisons.  

H.A. Kimball

The way New Hampshire cares for people with mental illness and developmental disabilities has changed dramatically over the past 200 years.

The shifts in approach have been urged on by advances in drugs and science, legislative mandate, budget cuts, and the force of media and popular culture.

Just 25 years ago, New Hampshire was a national leader in caring for people with mental and physical disabilities. Today, the state ranks closer to the bottom, and New Hampshire is in the middle of a period of dramatic change.

Thomas Fearon

We’ve been listening back to a 1989 report on the state of mental health care in New Hampshire. Last week, reporter Kathy McLaughlin explored the living conditions in the old New Hampshire Hospital buildings, which could be crowded and grim.

Today, we share part two of that report. NHPR’s Martin Murray spoke with Paul Gorman, superintendent of New Hampshire Hospital, who explained how the hospital’s new, community-oriented facility sought to treat patients.

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