millennials

Boston commuter cities like Nashua are jumping on the chance to develop a private passenger rail, after years of unsuccessful campaigning for a public rail system. New Hampshire's zoning ordinances and city planning processes are drawing criticism for their contribution to the current over-priced housing market. And millennials get their own commission to help the state appeal to a younger population. 


Gov. Chris Sununu held his first meeting with his newly-created millennial advisory council last week.

Austen Bernier from the National Forest Foundation was one of 25 Granite Staters appointed to the council.

He's 23 years old and lives in Albany.

NHPR’s Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spoke with Bernier this week about being chosen for the group and what he hopes it will accomplish.

This transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.

The scene: the Executive council chambers. The time: 6 p.m. on a Wednesday. The crowd? A mysterious, oft-stereotyped (and sometimes maligned) species, seen only rarely in the halls of the Statehouse: millennials.

They were there as part of a newly formed Millennial Advisory Council, announced last week by Gov. Chris Sununu.

Courtesy of Stay Work Play

Will Stewart arrived in New Hampshire, sight unseen, as a twenty-something in 2004. Now 38, he’s married, bought a home and is raising a child here.

In short, it’s exactly the scenario his new employer Stay Work Play wants to duplicate around the state.

Stewart will take over as executive director of the non-profit early next month.

Stay Work Play is dedicated to retaining and attracting young professionals to the state, doing so through events, partnerships and advocacy.

Wendy Nelson / Flickr/CC

We're talking with millennials from the state for an update on whether and why more young adults are leaving the New Hampshire than coming to it, and what it means for the economy.

  This program was originally broadcast on 3/10/16.

  

Prayitno via Flikcr CC / https://flic.kr/p/hmR8pM

Millennials are obsessing over a show about a group of twenty-somethings living their lives and making mistakes in New York City. No, it isn’t Girls, Broad City  – in fact you've probably have seen an  episode of this show...or two...or maybe two hundred. Today, the surprise resurgence of Friends.

And from low-brow sitcoms to high-brow performance - at nearly 20 epic hours, Wagner's Ring Cycle is rarely staged outside of the world's premiere opera houses. We'll hear about one man's mission to condense the masterpiece for local audiences.

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Mid-life crises are embarrassing and all-too-common...but surely not among the prudent judges of nation's highest court? On today’s show, a former court clerk's new novel imagines a Supreme Court justice going off the rails.

Then, we'll hear about how today's gyms are building personal bathrooms and shower stalls for body shy millennials -- one writer thinks it's absurd for adults to fear getting undressed in front of others.

Jason Michael via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9fEAzN

Baby Boomers like to thumb their nose at Millennials for being entitled narcissists who refuse to grow up, and Millennials tend to poo-poo the Boomers because they're out of touch old folks. But one group seems to get left out of the conversation entirely. Today, what ever happened to Generation X?

Then, many people would rather just say nothing than take a stab at saying something shallow, boring, or potentially offensive, but small talk does have its merits. So what are they? 

Department of Defense Photo by Marvin Lynchard / flic.kr/p/A2mXcC

Since the attacks in Paris, the question of how to engage ISIS and Syria has been front and center. Underlying that debate is the changing nature of America’s armed forces and how technology is shaping the future of soldiers. On today’s show a look at how America’s colleges and universities are reflecting the new military. Then, America’s bright young minds are being lured to jobs offering perks from gourmet food to telecommuting, that's stiff competition for the ordered and inflexible military. We’ll hear about the Pentagon's plan to fight "brain drain".

Brian Wilkins via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8dp2Hq

Last month China ended its controversial one-child policy – but is the change as radical as it’s been made out to be by officials and news outlets? Today, a reporter on China's new "two-child policy"... and why the country really needs to focus on sex-ed. Plus, Millennials are sometimes derided as a generation slacktivists, and don't have the spending power of their elders – but non-profits are betting on them for the future. From socially conscious spending, to gimmicky donation challenges, we explore how Millennials are changing the face of charitable giving.

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You’ll see it on Instagram, blogs, and YouTube – farmers market selfies, guides to organic produce, and clever hacks for cooking ambitious recipes in tiny kitchenettes. It seems like young people love to photograph what they had for dinner – no filter – and fixate over food culture. But why are Millennials so obsessed with food? Four years ago Eve Turow set out to answer that question and recently released her findings in the book A Taste of Generation Yum: How the Millennial Generation’s Love for Organic Fare, Celebrity Chefs and Microbrews Will Make or Break the Future of Food.

The economy is always a key issue in presidential campaigns.

But whose economy are we talking about? Many millennial voters are underemployed and crushed under thousands of dollars of student debt.

And perhaps nowhere is the problem more acute than in New Hampshire.

Seventy-six percent of the class of 2013 had loans. On average, each New Hampshire student was carrying $32,795 of debt, according to The Project on Student Debt. It's the nation's biggest student loan debt burden.

Penn State via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/qFn5HA

Millennials are often painted as entitled, selfie-snapping narcissists, but do they deserve the “kids these days” label?  On today’s show we’ll attempt to transcend the generation gap with a strong defense of the youngsters.

Then, we celebrate graduation season with author George Saunders, whose 2013  commencement address at Syracuse University contained a simple message: “be kinder”. The speech went viral, became a short film, and a book. He’ll explain why it rippled out far beyond that group of graduates.  

Biz Stone

With this generation of young adults coming into its own, we look at who they are and what motivates them.  Some say they’re entitled, obsessed with technology, and have short attention spans - but others say Millennials are highly creative, dynamic and more open to new ways of looking at society.

This show was originally broadcast on May 27, 2014.

  GUESTS: 

Maddie DeSantis

  When it comes to our state’s economic future, policymakers and business leaders bemoan New Hampshire’s aging population and the state’s failure to lure young people back to the state after college.  Usually, jobs are seen as the antidote. But in Somersworth, a youth renaissance is taking place thanks not to any employer – but to the strength of twelve millennials’ childhood bonds.

First, picture Somersworth. It’s got a couple pizza and sub shops, a pawn shop, a thrift store, and like in a lot of old New England mill towns, that’s about it.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

  College campuses used to be the domain of the Democrats. Two years ago, Democrats got 62 percent of the vote among 18-29 year olds.  And with midterm election turnout particularly low among college students, it didn't make sense for the GOP to spend time campaigning there.

“Traditionally in midterm elections, the GOP has said ‘we don’t think it’s worth expending the resources,’” says 32 year old Andrew Hemingway, a recent Republican candidate for Governor and manager of Newt Gingrich’s 2012 campaign in New Hampshire.

Four N.H. Senate and two Executive Council candidates debated a range of issues in Portsmouth Monday night. The forum was hosted by a new nonprofit dedicated to engaging young adults in the democratic process, called The 603 Initiative.

Republican candidate for NH Senate District 21, Phil Nazzaro argued the state should reduce its taxes on business profits tax. But Longtime Democratic incumbent Martha Fuller Clark said NH needs that revenue: