moose

Moose Munching
AL_HikesAZ / Flickr Creative Commons

Fall is a busy time for Kristine Rines's department, the moose are in rut (mating) and hunting season is open. She works for NH Fish and Game as the state’s first ever Moose Biologist. She received the distinguished “Moose Biologist of the Year” from her peers at the North American Moose Conference in 2006. Rines has announced her plans to retire after three decades on the job and sat down with Something Wild to reflect on her time studying the state’s moose.

Dave Spier via Flickr CC

New Hampshire is holding its annual moose hunt lottery.

The Fish and Game Department will issue 71 moose hunting permits on Friday. Winners are selected through a computerized random drawing.

Hunters who are drawn and accept a permit are not eligible to enter the lottery or apply for a bonus point for the following three years.

Last year, 105 permits were offered. New Hampshire has roughly 4,000 moose— about half the population from 10 years ago. The decline is due partly due to an increase in winter ticks.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

 

The deadline for entering New Hampshire's moose hunt lottery is May 27.

It costs $15 for residents and $25 for non-residents to enter the lottery. A total of 71 permits are proposed to be issued this year.

The state's moose hunt will run from Oct. 15-23.

Last year, the statewide hunter success rate was 69 percent.

Each applicant can enter once a year. A bonus point system improves the chances for unsuccessful applicants who apply each consecutive year.

New Hampshire Fish and Game officers are conducting a poaching investigation in Errol after they said a moose was found shot to death, with its antlers missing.

Officers responded to a tip on Sunday regarding the dead animal, found about three-fourths of a mile from the end of Smokey Camp Brook Road.

They said it was a mature bull moose, believed to have been shot on or around Friday. No meat was taken from the animal. Conservation officers were able to find some physical evidence at the scene.

Dave Spier via Flickr CC

Early indications show some promise for a New Hampshire moose herd that has been wobbled by a troublesome parasite.

Kristine Rines, a wildlife biologist and the moose project leader for the state's Fish and Game Department, says it's still too early to say with certainty if the 2014-15 winter will be better than previous winters, but data so far shows fewer calf deaths and fewer winter ticks.

Among the animals tagged by state biologists, seven of 27 calves had died as of last week. That's a 26 percent mortality rate, compared to 64 percent last year.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire Fish and Game is working on a new plan for how many deer, turkey, bear and moose hunters will be allowed to shoot between now and 2025. For moose-hunters in some parts of the state, that number may soon be zero.

Fish and Game is considering regional population thresholds, where if moose herd continues to decline it will call a moratorium on the moose hunt.

Dave Spier via Flickr CC

Biologists in New Hampshire and Maine are teaming up on a five-year study to better understand why moose populations are declining.

WMUR-TV reports that Maine's estimated population of 60,000 moose has fared better than New Hampshire's herd of about 4,000 but both states are seeing a decline, largely blamed on more winter ticks.

Lee Kantar of Maine's Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and Kristine Rines of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department are collaborating on the study.

North Country Moose Study Aided By Research 'Muggers'

Jan 28, 2015
northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

How's this for a typical day at the office: get into a helicopter, fly just above treetops in parts of northern New Hampshire, and find moose to tag, track and monitor. It's part of the work New Hampshire Fish and Game is doing to study the effect of winter tick and other parasites on the state's moose population.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire's moose season has come to an end, with at least 91 hunters succeeding in bagging a moose during the nine-day period.

The Fish and Game Department says a total of 127 permits were issued, representing a statewide success rate of 72 percent. That's fewer permits than in recent years, due to a drop in the moose population.

   

The State Conservation Committee is taking applications for $285,000 in conservation grants made possible by sales of the state's "Moose Plate."

When drivers' register their vehicles, they can spend an extra $30 for the moose plate. All funds raised through the program go to promotion, protect and invest in New Hampshire's natural, historical and cultural resources.

Moose Munching
AL_HikesAZ / Flickr Creative Commons

The deadline is approaching to enter New Hampshire's moose permit lottery.       Entries are due Friday, May 30.    The state is offering permits to 124 winners for this year's moose hunt, which runs from Oct. 18-26.  Last year's statewide hunter success rate for moose was 64 percent.   Winners will be selected through a computerized random drawing and announced on Friday, June 20.  To enter, visit http://www.huntnh.com to apply online or print out a mail-in application. Participants also can pick up a lottery application from any Fish and Game office or license agent.

State Begins Study On Moose Decline In N.H.

Feb 3, 2014
Northeast Naturalist via Flickr CC

New Hampshire Fish and Game will closely monitor 43 moose in the state to learn more about why their numbers keep decreasing.  

Brady Carlson

New Hampshire Fish and Game officials say they plan to reduce the number of moose hunting permits issued this year in response to the continued decline of the animal in some parts of the state.

Barbara via flickr Creative Commons

There are between 800,000 and 1.2 million moose in North America, but scientists are concerned that their numbers are shrinking – and fast. Moose populations from New Hampshire to Minnesota have been plummeting for years – as much as twenty-five percent each year in some cases – and while there are plenty of theories, nobody’s quite sure why.

Jim Robbins is a freelance writer and regular contributor to the New York Times. He wrote about the moose die-off for the Times’ environment section.

Long before Bullwinkle, has the moose been an iconic favorite in the state. In fact, naturalists for years have referred to them as 'charismatic megafauna'.  But recently the numbers of these gentle giants have reduced, some blame disease, others climate change. Now the state is doling out nearly $700.00 to tag and study the antlered animal. Today we learn more about the moose and what's being done to bring its numbers back.

Guests:

Brady Carlson

Seeing a moose in New Hampshire isn’t supposed to be news – unless the moose is in a more developed area, like the south end of Concord… and the person seeing it is a public radio host.

That’s right. On Saturday morning All Things Considered host Brady Carlson found a moose in his yard. Twice. The moose even sat down for a rest at one point, though, thankfully, he avoided the Carlsons' vegetable garden.

Flikr Creative Commons / Unhindered by Talent

New Hampshire Fish and Game is working to catch Moose poachers in Northern New Hampshire. But earlier this fall, the department worked to catch two Canadians poaching over the US – Canadian Border.

Fish and Game officials are seeking tips from the public about who shot a moose last week off of Kilkenny Loop Road in Berlin. Conservation officer Geoff Youngblood says the moose sustained multiple gunshot wounds, and tracks in the snow show the shooter finished the job at point black range, and then walked away, taking no meat.

October is the annual breeding season, "the rut" for the largest denizens of New Hampshire's North Country: Moose.  It's also the annual moose hunting season.

Following the initial recovery of moose populations, an annual moose hunt has occurred since 1988. That first year, 75 permits were issued for a three-day hunt in the North Country only. Last year, 400 moose permit hunters took 290 moose.

This year 275 coveted moose hunting permits were awarded by lottery from among more than 13,400 applicants for the nine-day season.

Warmer Seasons Pose Danger to Local Moose

Jul 17, 2012

Warm winters have been tipping the balance between New Hampshire moose and the winter ticks that feed on them.

The ticks have benefited from warmer temperatures, and their increasing numbers have become a problem for moose.

When too many ticks latch on to the moose, it suffers blood loss, hair loss, becomes sick, and sometimes dies.

Kristine Rines, a wildlife biologist with the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, says the real enemy is weather.