Morning Edition

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

    

The Senate Judiciary committee is expected to hear testimony Thursday afternoon on a bill that would repeal the requirement to obtain a license to carry a concealed gun.

The hearing is likely to draw a large crowd of gun rights advocates and those who have concerns about loosening the state’s firearms regulations.

Wolfeboro Republican and Senate Majority Leader Jed Bradley is the bill’s prime sponsor.

He joined Morning Edition to talk about his proposal.

Don McCullough/Flickr

    

At a hearing Thursday, officials from New Hampshire Fish & Game will propose new rules banning drones, smart rifles, and live-action game cameras in hunting.

Officials are trying to regulate these so-called emerging technologies, saying they’re not appropriate or ethical.

New Hampshire is not the first state to tackle this issue.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire is one of only two states where the governor’s term is only two years, Vermont being the other.

In most other states, governors serve four-year terms.

Lawmakers will once again debate this session whether to amend the state constitution and make the governor a four-year term.

Such efforts have failed in the legislature in the past.

Democratic Rep. Mario Ratzki of East Andover is the bill’s prime sponsor.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

The ride-sharing service Uber has been at the center of debate and controversy in several New Hampshire cities the past several months.

The company is operating in Portsmouth, Manchester and has recently started up in Nashua. Local officials in all of those cities continue to discuss how Uber’s drivers should be regulated.

In the middle of all this are the drivers themselves.

Antonio Correia works as an Uber driver in Manchester.

He joins Morning Edition to talk about this issue.

For those unfamiliar with Uber, how does it work?

www.fasteventsnh.com

Amy Diaz, Editor of the Hippo tells Morning Edition about some interesting weekend events- including the Henniker Hot Chocolate 5K/10K, Art and Bloom in Concord, and the National Readathon.

Ben Baldwin

    

As we all know, winter weather is a reality of life here in New Hampshire. More snow appears to be headed our way this weekend.

But until the storm actually gets here, it’s often hard to know if it’s going to be a wintry mix or freezing rain, or how dangerous driving conditions could be in certain areas of the state.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

County attorneys in New Hampshire have traditionally been elected, but a proposal going before state lawmakers seeks to change that.

A bill filed this session proposes to amend the state constitution to make the office of county attorney an appointed position, instead of elected by the voters.

A hearing on the bill is scheduled for the Senate Judiciary Committee later this morning.

NHPR Staff

A bill going before New Hampshire lawmakers would require employers to offer workers 40 hours of paid sick leave per year.

House Democrat Mary Stuart Gile of Concord is one of the sponsors, and says under the legislation, businesses with fewer than 15 employees would be exempt.

"Essentially, this bill is looking at workers in the service areas and who work part-time," she said. "For example, under our bill, people who work in offices but are not full-time workers would be able to have paid sick days."

    

Amy Diaz, Editor of the Hippo tells Morning Edition about some interesting weekend events- including the New Hampshire Macaroni and Cheese Bake Off, the Downton Abbey Tea in Brookline, and the Winter Wine Festival.

A report this week found New Hampshire schools must do more to graduate students in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math.

The STEM Task Force report issued Tuesday came up with a wide range of recommendations to prepare students for careers in those fields.

You can read the report here.

AP/Dick Morin

    

The New Hampshire Supreme Court is set to hear arguments Thursday that for the first time center on the fairness of a death penalty in the state.

Michael Addison is the state’s lone death row inmate. He was convicted and sentenced to death in 2008 for the murder of Manchester police officer Michael Briggs.

Thursday’s arguments will focus on whether Addison’s death sentence was fair compared to similar cases nationwide.

Buzz Scherr is a law professor at the University of New Hampshire School of Law.

In her inaugural address last week, Governor Maggie Hassan made the push for extending commuter rail from Boston to Nashua and Manchester.

"We must find a consensus way forward on rail that will build on our many advantages and help set the stage for a new generation of economic growth by keeping more of our young people right here in the Granite State," Hassan said. 

    

President Obama announced last week he wants to make community college free for students across the country.

Now, that would come with a hefty price tag – the federal government would have to pick up $60 billion in costs over the next decade, with participating states paying for the other 25 percent.

Students would also have to maintain a 2.5 GPA.

The ambitious initiative has sparked a lot of discussion in higher ed circles.

Kelli True / NHPR

    

The head of the state Republican Party was elected to her second term over the weekend.

Jennifer Horn first won the party’s chairmanship in 2013, and now with division among Republicans in the House and a big presidential primary looming, she’s taking on the role for another two years.

Jennifer Horn joins Morning Edition to talk about her re-election.

So you’ll be at the helm of the state Republican Party for another two years. What do you see as the biggest challenge heading into your second term?

www.unh.edu

While production of certain types of produce is seasonal, demand doesn’t stop when the growing season ends.

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire may have taken a step toward a solution to that dilemma.

In a study, they successfully grew bulbing onions planted in fall for a spring harvest with the aid of low tunnels.

Becky Sideman is a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station.

She joins Morning Edition to talk about her findings.

N.H. Fish & Game

Winter is most certainly upon us, so it’s an ideal time to brush up on some popular cold-weather outdoor activities.

New Hampshire Fish & Game, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Wildlife Federation, is offering a workshop next month for just that purpose. There’s training on everything from ice fishing to tracking wildlife on snowshoes to basic winter outdoor survival skills.

But here’s the twist: The program is for women only.

The “Becoming an Outdoors Woman” workshop will be held February 14.

Flikr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

    

Dartmouth College has charged 64 students accused of cheating in a sports ethics class with violating the Ivy League school’s honor code.  

Rob Wolfe has been reporting on this story for the Valley News and he joins Morning Edition to talk about what we know so far.

So what exactly are the 64 students accused of doing?

NHPR Staff

The new legislative session kicked off Wednesday, and by all accounts, the most pressing issue for lawmakers will be crafting a new, two year state budget.

The state is looking at potentially more than $100 million in new costs, and that’s before taking into account a possible multi-million dollar deficit in the current budget.

Republican Neal Kurk of Weare is the chairman of the House Finance Committee joined Morning Edition to talk about the task ahead for lawmakers.

www.kickstarter.com

A documentary is in the works that chronicles the Market Basket saga that unfolded last summer.

“Food Fight – Inside the Battle for Market Basket” is a project directed by Portsmouth filmmaker Jay Childs.

You can learn more about the film on the project's Kickstarter page.

He was there with his camera to capture the story as workers protested and customers boycotted the firing of CEO Arthur T. Demoulas.

Building On Hope

New Hampshire nonprofits have the chance for an extreme makeover.

Building On Hope is accepting applications through the end of January to choose its next major renovation project.

The volunteer organization relies on donations from builders, architects, designers and suppliers, and has completed $800,000 in renovations for New Hampshire nonprofits over the past six years.

Jonathan Halle from Building On Hope recently joined Rick Ganley to talk about what he’s looking for to help choose the next project.

www.flickr.com

It’s no secret that tourism is a vital part of the New Hampshire economy.

It’s the state’s second-largest industry, so it’s fair to say Victoria Cimino has a big job on her hands.

She’s the state’s new director of tourism.

She’s been on the job a few weeks now, and joins Morning Edition to talk about her new role.

So tourism is obviously critical to the state’s economy. How much money are we talking about bringing into the state on a yearly basis? And is it your hope to grow that figure?

Chris Jensen / NHPR

New Hampshire’s new voluntary Hike Safe program is set to launch at the start of the New Year.

For a cost of $25 per person or $35 for a family, the Hike Safe card absolves hikers who need to be rescued of footing the bill for costly rescue operations.

You can purchase one here.

New Hampshire Fish & Game Executive Director Glenn Normandeau joins Morning Edition to talk about the new program.

    

The ride-sharing service Uber is causing a stir in Portsmouth.

The company hires third-party drivers and allows customers to request rides using a smartphone app. It’s been operating in the city for at least the past month.

The company also has drivers in Manchester, where city officials have been debating whether the service should be subject to the same regulations as taxis.

That same debate unfolded this week during a meeting of the Portsmouth taxi commission.

Peter Bresciano is the chairman of the commission. He joined Morning Edition.

www.windhamsd.org

After being among more than 7,000 teachers nationwide nominated for a music educator Grammy earlier this year, Jared Cassedy, director of fine arts for the Windham School District, is now one of 10 finalists for the award.

This is the second year the Grammys has handed out that award, which is meant to honor music teachers who’ve made an impact on students’ lives.

Cassedy spoke with Rick Ganley on Morning Edition.

What’s your reaction to being one of the ten finalists for this honor? Were you surprised?

www.unh.edu

The top-ranked University of New Hampshire football team is set to begin its playoff run this weekend.

The Wildcats will host Fordham University Saturday afternoon in the second round of the NCAA D-1 Football Championship.

Head coach Sean McDonnell joined Morning Edition from Durham to reflect on the season and preview this weekend’s playoff matchup.

After just a single loss in the first game of the season, you ended up with a string of 10 wins. Can you recap this spectacular season?

Jacki Dee via Flickr CC

Cornish resident and 'Gardening Guy’ Henry Homeyer has been busy harvesting his tomatoes. He offers some tips on what to do with a bumper crop.

How have your tomato plants been doing this year?

“It’s been a great year – knock on wood – for tomatoes. We’ve had plenty of sunshine, plenty of moisture. I get a lot of emails from readers of my weekly gardening column and I have not heard a single complaint about late blight coming in early and wiping out anybody’s tomatoes, so I think we’re doing fine.”

Robert Bell via Flickr CC

Last week we talked with Cornish resident and gardening guy Henry Homeyer about bugs—more specifically bugs in the garden. Henry writes a weekly column for several newspapers around New England, and this week is tackling another bane: weeds. Let’s find out how he deals with them.

Want to learn more about Henry? Click here to read his blog.

Brad Smith, Flickr CC

If you spend time tending a garden, chances are that you’ve come across some insects you don’t know. Other times there may be bugs you think you know and may be tempted to get rid of. Henry Homeyer argues that that’s not always the best thing to do. Homeyer is a lifelong organic gardener living in Cornish Flat. He’s the author of four gardening books and writes a weekly gardening column for ten newspapers around New England. I spoke with Homeyer on Thursday:

John Tann Flickr CC

As the tick population continues to explode in the Northeast, the number of cases of Lyme disease continues to grow. It’s a big issue in New Hampshire as we have thousands of cases of Lyme each year, but experts say the number is actually much higher than what is ever reported. There are also many other tick-borne diseases that are being misdiagnosed and treated incorrectly.

 Related: Things You Should Know About Ticks 

Division Of The Arts Lands New Director

Jun 16, 2014

New Hampshire will soon have a new director of the Department of Cultural Resources Division of the Arts. Ginnie Lupi comes to the position after serving of the executive director of the ARTS Council of the Southern Finger lakes in Corning, NY. Lupi will take over the position in August. I spoke with Lupi about her appointment as director and her plans for art in the Granite State:

What does the department do and what is your role in the Arts Division?

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