motherhood

5.10.15: Happy Mother's Day

May 8, 2015
Logan Shannon / NHPR

It’s Mother’s Day weekend, time to shower mom with flowers, candy, and homemade cards.  On today’s show we’ll hear the story of Anna Jarvis, the woman who spent ten years trying to establish Mother’s Day as a holiday, and the rest of her life trying to end it.

Then, the late night TV monologue is one of few times American audiences can still share a good laugh. We’ll talk to seasoned comedy writer Jon Macks, about the one time of day when power, rather than partisanship, is the punch line.

Elizabeth via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/qNttFS

With a market value up to $2.50 an ounce, and online sales on the rise, it’s been called liquid gold. On today’s show, a look into the breast milk market, and how the biotech industry is getting in on the game.

Then, the question of why Homo sapiens thrived while Neanderthals became extinct has long been debated among scientists. We’ll hear from an anthropologist with a stunning new theory that explains their extinction: humans had dogs.

Listen to the full show or click read more for individual segments.

Food Pantry Provides What Food Stamps Can't

Jul 27, 2013
Seacoast Family Food Pantry of New Hampshire

The Seacoast Family Food Pantry began as the Ladies Humane Society in 1816 to assist families of fishermen. Now, it is still serving those in the community who need help. The pantry aids many families with children—and many elders. Jane is a widow living on a fixed income.

“There are a lot of things you can’t buy with food stamps, but down at the pantry, they cover just about everything that you would need in your household,” Jane said.

iweatherman Flickr Creative Commons

Hear the phrase “Girl Scout meeting”, and you may think merit badges, social service projects – cookies, perhaps? Well, for a few girls in the Granite State, a scout meeting is one of the few times they get to see their incarcerated mothers. NHPR correspondent Melanie Plenda reported from Goffstown Womens’ Prison on the program, called Girl Scouts Beyond Bars.

The past week's political firestorm in the presidential race focused on stay-at-home moms, but two-thirds of women with young children now work. Nearly half are their family's primary breadwinner. What some feel is being lost in the political debate are the challenges they face in the workplace.

When Kids Get Sick

Karen and Casey Jordan via Flickr

Statistics from the Pew Research Center show that single women over 35 now account for around fifteen percent of the birthrate in the united states. One reason may be that there are so many more options for women who have delayed motherhood -- from adoption to using donor sperm to freezing their own eggs. Journalists Pamela Ferdinand, Carey Goldberg, and Beth Jones all had fulfilling careers, rich friendships, and hapless relationship histories.