Movies

Elias Levy via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/orHiFR

There are a lot of adjectives used to describe great white sharks:  Giant. Fearsome. Deadly.  But author and naturalist Sy Montgomery has seen sharks up close and might choose another word - like sublime. Today, the ocean's most mysterious and misunderstood predator gets a closer look.

Then, maybe you heard about the guy visiting Yellowstone who put a cold, abandoned baby buffalo in his car and drove it to a ranger station.  Attempts to reunite the little guy with its herd failed and it was euthanized - inciting an online riot over how humans interact with wild animals. 

Dennis Jarvis via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/6q9vFQ

It's called poverty tourism: guided visits to slums and shantytowns for close-up view of locals living in the shadows of landmarks and luxury hotels. Today, the pros and cons of straying off the typical tourist path.

Then, media outlets, pop culture blogs, TV re-cappers and social media are all potential spoilers for others who've yet to see a blockbuster or hit show. Yet global social media thrives on discussion in real time...so what's a person to do? Vulture polled its readers to find out the best approach for spoiler etiquette and we spoke with a TV and movie critic about the results. 

Stephen Little via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/dThgwp

This weekend Batman and Superman will face off in multiplexes across America. It will be, as the trailer promises, a classic set-up.

2.22.16: Maycomb Revisited & Oscar Smear Campaigns

Feb 22, 2016
Davidlohr Bueso via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/6W4DBr

This weekend, writers and book lovers mourned the passing of Harper Lee, the celebrated author of To Kill a Mockingbird. Today, we'll visit Lee's birthplace, Monroeville, Alabama, a small town that has produced two great American authors.

Then, as Hollywood gears up for the Academy Awards, we'll scratch beneath the award show's glitz and glam for a look at the long and crooked history of Oscar smear campaigns.

Mrs. America, Fashion Victims, & Female Action Figures

Jan 29, 2016
Ed T via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/7g7MyS

Most beauty pageants test the mettle of contestants in categories like the evening gown and swimsuit competition, the Mrs. America pageant has a history of judging contestants a bit differently. On today's show we'll look at the long and strange history of the pageant.

Then, when a garment factory in Bangladesh collapsed, the public cried out against sweatshop conditions and the deadly price of fast fashion - but fashion, it turns out, has been costing people their lives for a very long time.

Also today, #WheresRey? A dubious decision to bet against female action figures leads to an online backlash against toy companies.

http://gph.is/18Y0uxF

Gluten-free? Olive or coconut oil for cooking? Mediterranean or paleo? If nutrition is a science, why does the research vary so wildly, and why all the zany correlations between who we are and what we eat? On today’s show, faith, party affiliation and other fictions from food science.

Then, with ringing cell phones and sing alongs, the Filter Theater production of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night is anything but reverent, and that's the way they like it.

12.27.15: The Holiday Cocoon Show

Dec 25, 2015
Sean Reay via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/B9ecDh

Last winter researchers set off for Norway’s northern reaches where the sun barely rises above the horizon to find out how residents cope with the cold and darkness and discovered something remarkable. Today, we reveal the Norwegian secret to enjoying a harsh winter.

Phil Long via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/b1H21c

Last winter researchers set off for Norway’s northern reaches where the sun barely rises above the horizon to find out how residents cope with the cold and darkness and discovered something remarkable. On this Solstice day, we reveal the Norwegian secret to enjoying a harsh winter. Plus, how Granite Staters feel about the lack of snow this holiday season. Then, for some parents, Christmas raises a conundrum – how to navigate the magical world of Santa. 

mendhak via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/8NVvt5

Cryptography is a complex field of mathematics that gets more complicated every day, and yet movies that feature ciphers, code breaking and puzzles that would break the minds of most math students make cryptography seem quick and easy. 

Here are five movies that feature code breaking and manage to make math seem more magical than logical.

The Imitation Game

Aleks via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/bpcW4g

Prior to the Civil War, images of war were the stuff of legends and mystery – then came the photographs of Alexander Gardner. Today, the legacy of a photographer who captured the graphic violence of war, and inspired questions about the power and ethics of war photography that are still being discussed today.  Plus, we’ll dive into a collection of more than 700 antique cookbooks to find out what scholars can learn by looking at food - and get a taste for some unusual recipes from back in the day. 

OZinOH via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/4iiMnW

The US says it will open its doors to at least 10,000 refugees fleeing turmoil in Syria, but that doesn’t mean open arms. Today, we’ll learn about the detention process that keeps asylum seekers behind bars for months – even years – in hidden facilities across the country. Plus, a look at the upcoming lineup for this weekend’s New Hampshire Film Festival – including a documentary about the Gore Vidal vs. William F. Buckley debates that turned televised political debates into blood sport. 

10.07.15: Star Wars, IKEA Hacking, & Flood Watch

Oct 7, 2015
Pineapples101 via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/7xkHz2

The first Star Wars film may have been released 38 years ago, but its hold on the popular imagination remains as strong as Darth Vader’s death-grip. On today’s show, a look at the role fandom has played in the success of the Star Wars franchise. Plus, from data collection to the latest internet tracking technology, online advertisers go to great lengths to find out who we are and what we like. We’ll enter the world of intelligent marketing to find out just how much, or little, they really know about us.

Chris Goldberg via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/cjtwcN

Police shootings of unarmed black men and the deaths of African-Americans in police custody have prompted calls for a national conversation about racial inequality. So, what do well-meaning, privileged white people have to add? Today, the author of a new memoir urges white people to examine their privileged place in a stacked deck. Then, author and New Hampshire magazine editor Rick Broussard turns film director for Granite Orpheus, an experimental film project that sets the ancient myth of Orpheus against the torn-up streets of Concord.   

Amadscientist via Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1IKjA9n

Tomorrow marks the fortieth anniversary of the longest running film in continuous release ever – The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Today, a critic deconstructs how the long-running cult classic introduced the LGBTQ community to the mainstream. We’ll also hear from the organizers of a Rocky Horror convention on the appeal of midnight showings and fishnet stockings in America’s rural and suburban towns. 

bulbocode909 via Flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/b7u4np

This week, South Carolina’s senate debates whether the Confederate flag should be removed from public view at the state capitol. We're looking at the film that helped resuscitate the confederacy after the Civil War – D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation. Then, when NBC canceled Hannibal earlier this summer, fans hardly had time to complain before rumors began to circulate about the show being picked up by one of the online streaming services now keeping shows alive long after networks give up on them. Finally, a Supreme Court case that was overshadowed by an historic slate of decisions. A California farm challenged a Depression-era law that allows the government to forcibly appropriate food crops to control prices.

6.25.15: The Lost Art of Surrender & Still Dreaming

Jun 25, 2015
Jan Jacobsen via Google Images Creative Commons / http://www.worldpeace.no/THE-WHITE-FLAG.htm

“From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever…” from Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce to General Lee, the act of surrender has a noble past. We look at the history of surrender in warfare and discover why waving the white flag has become increasingly rare. Then, we talk to two filmmakers who set up cameras at an assisted living facility for artists whose performing days are far behind them. Their new documentary follows the cast of residents as they rehearse for a public performance of a Shakespearean classic. 

Listen to the full show. 

6.24.15: Trolls, Back to the Future & Gray Hair

Jun 24, 2015
Darrell Miller via Flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/biFVsZ

Internet trolls – they shame, threaten, bully…and help sell ads!  A researcher infiltrates a trolling network and the cycle of harassment. Plus, we celebrate the 30th anniversary of back to the future, the billion dollar film franchise that repurposed the Delorian, reinvented time travel, and gave us the hoverboard. And from Rihanna to lady gaga – dyed gray hair is a hot fashion trend. Feminist statement or a passing fad? 

Shandi-lee Cox via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/9kWmqX

Jurassic World opened this weekend to big crowds but mixed reviews from the scientific community. On today’s show a paleoartist takes issue with the film’s inaccurate depiction of dinosaurs.

Then, from tips for Hollywood filmmakers, to tips for aspiring comics, a comedy insider, and former editor of The Onion, explains what it takes to earn a living making people laugh.

©John Conway / johnconway.co

When Jurassic Park was released in theaters back in 1993, the scientific community was in shock. Happy shock, that is. For once, Hollywood got the science part—mostly­­—right. Long thought to be lumbering beasts, who slogged around the earth, Jurassic Park ushered in a new era of understanding when it came to dinosaurs: they were actually fast and smart.

David Coxon via www.flickr.com/photos/davidcoxon

The Southern Poverty Law Center is out with its annual survey on hate groups.  The good news? Active hate groups are on the decline.  The bad news? They've relocated online.  Today on Word of Mouth, a disturbing look at the hidden state of hate in America.  Also, a historian reveals the surprising method many early New Englanders used to pass correspondence from colony to colony: Native American couriers.

Listen to the full show and click read more for individual segments.

Oscar Image: Davidlohr Bueso via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/6W4DBr

Of course the Oscar ceremony is already too long, they even have a whole separate awards ceremony for the awards most people outside of the film industry don't understand, but we still think the Oscars are missing a few key awards. Enter the 1st Annual Wommie Awards! We asked Amy Diaz from The Hippo to help us create a ballot chock full of amazing talent that aren't getting the recognition we think they deserve. 

Check out the nominees below and then cast your vote by 

Judy van der Velden via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/b3PGUM

Diamonds are forever. Or so we thought. Turns out that global sales of diamonds and fine jewelry have been sluggish since the global recession. On today’s show,  from iPhones to better production of costume bling, is technology killing the jewelry industry?

Then, Selma, Gone Girl, and Interstellar are among this year’s Oscar snubs. We’ll approach the academy’s cold-shoulder from a different angle, and reveal entire categories notably absent from the awards.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Michael Lokner via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/7kYSTb

The workplace/office has long been the source of gripes at the dinner table, but it is also a mainstay in Hollywood as an obstacle for movie characters to overcome or endure. The movie Office Space is an obvious example of an office playing an essential supporting role--or even the lead role--in a movie, so we didn't include it in the list. There are plenty more that didn't make the cut. Have a favorite? Let us know on our Facebook page.

Sleeper Films Of 2014

Jan 8, 2015
Sara Robertson via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/7TR6o3

The Golden Globes are coming up, the event that will spark moviegoers to re-watch their favorite – now award-winning – films of 2014. But what about the other films of 2014, the ones that didn’t make the cut? We spoke to Amy Diaz about her list of “sleeper” films – films that are not nominated, but that you should pay attention to anyway. From The Babadook to The Obvious Child, Amy gave us some great suggestions about what to watch on a snow day.

Guardians of the Galaxy

In our monthly segment "On Demand," we help improve your movie nights by offering suggestions for films that are currently streaming on Netflix Instant.   This month, we thought we’d do something a little different.  Just in time for Thanksgiving, here are five classic films about family that you wouldn’t exactly call “family films.”  If you’re gearing up for a visit from your own eccentric relatives, this queue will remind you that it could be a lot worse.

Tom Simpson via flickr Creative Commons

The first Star Wars film may have been released 37 years ago, but its hold on the popular imagination remains as strong as Darth Vader’s death-grip. On today’s show, a look at the role fandom has played in the success of the Star Wars franchise.

Plus, from data collection to the latest internet tracking technology, online advertisers go to great lengths to find out who we are and what we like. We’ll enter the world of intelligent marketing to find out just how much, or little, they really know about us.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Change The Sound, Change The Mood

Oct 27, 2014
Alexis Gordon via flickr Creative Commons

When we spoke to Joel Beckerman about his new book Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms the Way We Think, Feel, and Buy, we couldn't help but think of the movie trailer. Designed to show only the best parts of a movie, a trailer's job is to convince you to pay the price of admission, and give you a sense of the movie. Movie trailer directors artfully use sound to create a mood in just a few short minutes. So what happens when you change the sound?

Picking out a movie can be a lot like browsing the cereal aisle - the more options you have, the harder it is to decide what to watch.  It's especially difficult for subscription-based services like Netflix and Amazon Prime, which offer you more programming than you can even browse in one sitting. In our monthly segment "On Demand", we help make your movie nights memorable by offering our favorite movies and shows being made available this month.

jar (away) via Flickr CC

It’s crazy-serial-killer-in-the-woods time of year in New Hampshire.

You might not know it - and you perhaps should tell your kids if they’re at summer camp - but right now location scouts are scouring Granite State lakes and campgrounds for the picture perfect backdrop for movies, TV shows, and commercials...and we’re in the thick of horror film season.

We checked with Matt Newton of the NH Film and Television Office to tell us some things we didn’t know about how Hollywood finds its way to New Hampshire towns from Hollis to Hudson to Hanover.

W10002 via Flickr CC

 Anyone who has taken a personality test knows that they tend to be long, indepth, and even invasive. But today we discover how a group of researchers is testing levels of narcissism with one simple question. And, we’ll look into what an inflated sense of self means for society at large. Then, a philosopher and ethicist joins us to discuss the delicate balance between confidence and vanity in the age of the selfie. Plus, New Hampshire has a bigger role in cinema than you may have realized. We look at what roles put our state on the map.

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