Music

The Record
8:33 am
Fri April 20, 2012

Levon Helm, Drummer And Singer In The Band, Dies

Levon Helm performing with The Band in 1971.
Jan Persson Redferns

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Word of Mouth
10:56 am
Thu April 19, 2012

So Percussion: Beyond the Beat

So Percussion, a New York-based quartet, brings an epic approach to the backbeat. 

We speak with members Adam Silwinski and Eric Beach in advance of their show at The Hop at Dartmouth College. 

 

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Music Interviews
8:41 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Anoushka Shankar: A Sitar Player In Andalusia

"There's a very primal, emotional response I feel when I hear flamenco," sitar player Anoushka Shankar says. "It's quite in the belly in a way."
Harper Smith

Anoushka Shankar is the daughter and protege of the renowned Indian sitar player Ravi Shankar, who is credited with introducing Indian classical music to Western audiences. Now, Anoushka Shankar carries on this tradition in more ways than one. On her new album, Traveller, she goes back in time to make the connections between India and Spain.

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The Record
6:15 pm
Tue April 17, 2012

How That Tupac Hologram At Coachella Worked

A holographic representation of Tupac Shakur seen during a performance by Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre at the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival on Sunday, April 15.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:46 am

Tupac Shakur was killed more than 15 years ago — three years before the first Coachella Valley Music & Arts festival was held. But thanks to a trick of light, he's probably the single most talked about musician who performed at this year's version of the festival.

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The Record
4:00 pm
Mon April 16, 2012

Andrew Love Of The Memphis Horns Has Died

Andrew Love (left) and Wayne Jackson pose for a studio portrait in 1965.
Gilles Petard Redferns

Saxophonist Andrew Love of the Memphis Horns has died. Love, who had Alzheimer's disease, died on April 12 at his home in Memphis. He was 70 years old.

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Word of Mouth - Segment
11:51 am
Mon April 16, 2012

And now...from you.

Photo by Rebecca Lavoie

One listener wants to know how we choose music for segments. Another wants to brag about her nine year-old's fiddlehead business. 

We take on more of your feedback, and get your burning questions answered. 

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Music Interviews
3:15 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Spiritualized: The Man Who Fell To Earth

Sweet Heart Sweet Light is the latest album by Spiritualized, the spacey British rock band led by Jason Pierce.
Courtesy of the artist

In 2001, a German nature magazine sent a crew to observe the eruption of Mount Etna, the volcano on the eastern coast of Sicily. The report they filed began with this line: "We got as close as we could for safety to the center of the eruption, and set up our equipment and our cameras. Then a man in a silver spacesuit marched up to where we were — and kept on walking."

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History
2:32 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

'Violins Of Hope': Instruments From The Holocaust

Amnon Weinstein prepares a violin from the Holocaust for exhibit. He began restoring the violins in 1996 and now has 30 of them to display in an exhibit called Violins of Hope.
Nancy Pierce

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:28 am

Amnon Weinstein first encountered a violin from the Holocaust 50 years ago. He was a young violin maker in Israel, and a customer brought him an old instrument in terrible condition and wanted it restored.

The customer had played on the violin on the way to the gas chamber, but he survived because the Germans needed him for their death camp orchestra. He hadn't played on it since.

"So I opened the violin, and there inside there [were] ashes," Weinstein says.

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The Record
10:17 pm
Fri April 13, 2012

Kraftwerk In New York: Decades Of Influence On Display

Ralf Hutter (left) and the other members of Kraftwerk in performance at the Museum of Modern Art in New York on Tuesday.
Peter Boettcher Courtesy of MoMA

Originally published on Fri April 13, 2012 4:00 pm

Imagine an era when mainstream music wasn't filled with synthesizers. When electronic music wasn't a force propelling everything from pop and hip-hop to music from the underground. There was a time when this world existed. Then Kraftwerk emerged, and the world we knew changed.

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The Record
12:01 am
Fri April 13, 2012

Hearing In Megaupload Case To Determine Fate Of Users' Data

Megaupload boss Kim Dotcom in February as he is granted bail in a New Zealand court. Dotcom is in New Zealand waiting on a U.S. bid to extradite him on online piracy charges.
Michael Bradley AFP/Getty Images

On Friday morning a hearing scheduled in the criminal copyright case of Megaupload may have implications for all kinds of companies that sell storage space in the cloud — storage space used for anything from music files to family photos, research data to movie collections. The hearing will focus on what happens when the federal government blocks access to allegedly illegal files along with clearly legal ones.

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Music News
2:56 pm
Thu April 12, 2012

Freddie King: Rock Hall Inductee, Patriarch Of Blues Rock

Freddie King performs in 1973.
Getty Images

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The Record
4:15 pm
Tue April 10, 2012

Everybody Wants To Be A K-Pop Star

South Korean girl group Girls' Generation onstage during the Seoul Music Awards in January.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

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Author Interviews
3:24 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Carole King, From Doo-Wopper To Chart Topper

Carole King was in a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines when she was a teenager.
Jim McCrary

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 7:16 am

Carole King has an armful of Grammy Awards and countless Top 10 hits, both under her own name and as a songwriter for artists from Little Eva to the Monkees to Aretha Franklin.

Her solo album Tapestry spent 15 weeks at the top of the charts, becoming one of the biggest-selling records of all time. King managed to fit in all those hits by starting very, very young. She tells NPR's Renee Montagne that she was just 15 when she and some classmates formed a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines.

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Music Interviews
12:01 am
Tue April 10, 2012

M. Ward: Sounds Of A Different Time And Place

M. Ward's latest album, A Wasteland Companion, comes out April 10.
Courtesy of the artist

M. Ward's music inspires a sense of wonder — it recalls many sounds from a different time and place.

"I get most of my inspiration from older records and older production styles," Ward says, "and that ends up rearing its head in the records that I make. One of the great things about music is that it has the capability of time travel — you smell a certain smell in the room and it takes you back to your childhood. I feel like music is able to do that, and it happens to me all the time."

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The Record
4:30 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

How To Succeed In The Music Business (By Trying Really, Really Hard)

Raka Dun (left) and Raka Rich of the Oakland, Calif., duo Los Rakas.
Laura Sydell via Instagram NPR

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 2:43 pm

It's never been easy to make a living as a musician. But there was always a dream: to become a star on the strength of your talent and your music. The Internet is a rude sandman, however, and today that dream is a lot more convoluted.

No longer can a would-be rock star follow the once-accepted checklist: (1) sign with a big label, (2) get a hit, (3) buy mansions and cars. The number of ways a musician can make money is now varied. The question, for many musicians still trying to make a go of it in the industry, is whether those many sources can add up to something sustainable.

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