Native American

Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat June 2, 2012

Mount Kearsarge Indian Museum

The Mount Kearsarge Indian Museum is dedicated to sharing Native American history and culture, past and present, with all who come through its doors. In addition to displaying its collection and maintaining a lending library, the museum holds Powwows and runs educational and special programs. Peter Newell is chief of the New Hampshire Intertribal Native American Council.

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Series: Shifting the Balance
12:48 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

America's First Locavores

Photo by Whatsername, via Flickr Creative Commons

Widespread obesity among Native Americans has led to spiking diabetes rates among young people in the current generation. The phenomenon partially blamed on the lack of access to healthy food on reservations. Edible Idaho’s Guy Hand recently looked at what a food coalition on the coeur d'alene reservation of North Idaho is doing to connect the people there to better eating, starting with their nutrient-rich roots. 

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Around the Nation
3:28 pm
Wed April 4, 2012

Fewer Tribal Ironworkers Reaching For The Sky

Kaniehtakeron Martin's work site at 54th Street and 8th Avenue in Manhattan, which will someday be an office building.
Stephen Nessen for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:54 am

Since the 1900s, the country's most iconic bridges and skyscrapers have been put up by men who risked life and limb to connect steel beams hundreds of feet in the sky. Ironworkers come from all backgrounds, but a small Indian reserve outside Montreal has supplied the U.S. with a proud lineage of Mohawk ironworkers.

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Race
12:01 am
Thu March 15, 2012

Voters May Break Up Fight Over 'Fighting Sioux'

The University of North Dakota's Brad Eidsness makes a save during a game against the Minnesota Golden Gophers. Since 2005, there have been a series of lawsuits and legislative actions over the nickname for the school's athletic teams, the "Fighting Sioux."
Josh Holmberg AP

Originally published on Thu March 15, 2012 8:34 am

The state Supreme Court in North Dakota is about to consider this question: Can lawmakers require a college to name its sports teams after a Native American tribe?

For decades, University of North Dakota teams have been known as the "Fighting Sioux." It's a name some see as an honor and others find demeaning. Now, the long fight over the Fighting Sioux may be settled in a courtroom.

2,400 Logos And A 'Vexing' Dispute

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Race
3:26 am
Mon February 27, 2012

Through Video, Lakota Students Reject Stereotypes

Feather Rae Colombe (from left) appeared in the Lakota student video More Than That. Kim Bos is a video technology teacher who helped produce the video. Student John Whirlwind Soldier directed the video.
Jim Kent

Unhappy with portrayals of Native Americans in mainstream media, a group of students from South Dakota's Rosebud Sioux Reservation created a video to show that their community is about more than alcoholism, broken homes and crime.

The students are visiting Washington, D.C., on Monday to lobby Congress for increased funding for schools on reservations.

Filmed in black and white, the student-produced video More Than That takes viewers through the hallways, classrooms and gymnasium of the Rosebud Sioux Reservation's county high school.

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The Exchange
10:00 am
Wed November 23, 2011

New Hampshire's Immigration Story: New Hampshire's Earliest Residents and Immigrants

Our series on New Hampshire Immigration continues with our state’s first residents.  Before textile mills, melting pots and refugees there were Native Americans who inhabited the state for centuries, and our first immigrants, English fisherman and entrepreneurs  looking to escape Puritan rules and start a new life. We’ll look at who these first Granite Staters were and how they shaped our immigration story.  

Guests

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Word of Mouth
12:00 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Word of Mouth for November 21th, 2011

Bob Haozous, Chiricahua Apache/Diné (Navajo), Apache Pull-Toy, 1988, painted steel. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Purchased through the Joseph B. Obering ’56 Fund; S.989.17.
Photo courtesy of the Hood at Dartmouth

Reverse migration: African American populations boomerang back below the Mason-Dixon line.  Plus, why adding "sandwich board" to your resume could be a good thing.  Also, an NGO spreading sustainability in Niger turns 10.  And a look at a Native American Art exhibition from the Hood at Dartmouth.  Finally, data through light - the future of electronic transfer?

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Word of Mouth - Segment
12:00 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Native American Art at Dartmouth

For Native Americans, Thanksgiving is not a cause for celebration.  The holiday commemorating the survival – thanks to the Wampanoag tribe – of early settlers also marks the first wave of a European invasion that culminated in the death of 10 to 30 million native people.

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