natural disaster

Copyright 2013 JMA/EUMETSAT

Nearly a week has passed since Typhoon Haiyan ripped through the Philippines.  Aid organizations are reporting more than 10,000 dead, though Filipino President Aquino says that number is far overblown. Whatever the number, many more will likely succumb to disease or dehydration as relief slowly pours in to the hardest hit areas. Security is a major concern among officials in areas now teetering towards anarchy. Yesterday, Reuters reported that nearly 30,000 bags of rice were stolen from a government warehouse and rampant looting has turned deadly.   

Americans spring into action after such disasters, emptying their cupboards of old canned goods, medicines and clothing. Jessica Alexander urges you not to. She’s the  author of Chasing Chaos: My Decade In And Out Of Humanitarian Aid. We read her article “Please Don’t Send Your Old Shoes To The Philippines” on and reached her this morning at the UN.

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E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: How are droughts and wildfires caused by global warming? I thought warming mostly brought on wet and flooded conditions. -- David Mossman, Albuquerque, NM

In late August of 2011, New England prepared as the storm barreled up the east coast.  Though downgraded to a tropical storm, Irene was still daunting -- and deadly. To the surprise of many, Vermont was the hardest hit, with roads, bridges, and farmland badly damaged and lives lost. But parts of New Hampshire were hit hard as well.  We’ll talk about how we’re recovering from this storm and what we’ve learned.