New Hampshire economy

A New Normal?: N.H.'s Post-Recession Economy

Jan 14, 2015
Philip Long / Flickr/CC

Although the state has regained all the jobs it lost in the Great Recession, many are said to be part-time or lower paying.   Still, the U.S. economy seems to be on a roll, and optimism appears to be taking hold. We’re looking at who’s faring well and why in the Granite State, and who’s been left behind.

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The Economic Impact Of Substance Abuse In N.H.

Dec 17, 2014
Joe Shlabotnik / Flickr/CC

On top of individual suffering, a recent report finds alcohol and drugs also take a toll on workforce productivity and the state’s fiscal well-being -- to the tune of nearly two billion dollars.  The authors say policy makers and business leaders should consider addressing this as way to help bolster the state’s economy.

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nhpolicy.org

The New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies writes a report of their annual survey of the major policy issues and critical questions shaping New Hampshire's future. The data explain where New Hampshire has been, forecast where it is heading, and explore how current trends and policy choices facing the state will affect the well-being of its citizens.

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N.H.'s Economy: Back On Track?

Aug 11, 2014
Congressman Frank Guinta / Flickr/CC

Both at the national level and in New Hampshire, several signs suggest the economy is on the mend, with a stronger job market, firmer consumer confidence, and more generous lending among banks.  Still, some experts warn this recovery is incomplete, with troubling factors such as slow wage growth and international turmoil.

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L. via Flickr Creative Commons

Happy campers produce more than beaded wallets and macramé planters. They also generate millions in revenue, payroll and taxes.

At last count there were 289 youth summer camps in New Hampshire, contributing $317 million to the state’s economy and supporting 4,400 jobs with $128 million in total payroll, according to a 2011 report issued by the American Camps Association of New England.

LendingMemo / Flickr Creative Commons

Just many places across the country, the New Hampshire’s recover from the recession has been slow. Recently, though, many are pointing to signs of an upswing. Housing prices are going up, while foreclosures are going down.  Consumer confidence is better than it has been in a while, and unemployment is now at 5.1% - 11th best in the country. But all is not perfect:  many in the Granite State worry about high energy costs, the Affordable Care Act’s effect on business, and uneven progress in different regions of the state.

Nine New Hampshire companies will share more than $100,000 in state Job Training Fund grants awarded this month.  

BIA Releases Strategic Economic Plan For N.H.

Nov 18, 2013

  The Business and Industry Association of New Hampshire has released its first economic plan for the state

The plan includes more than 100 policy recommendations covering nine areas believed to be essential to the state’s economy.  The recommendations include some classic BIA issues, like streamlining access to the Research and Development tax credit and increasing STEM education.  But there’s also a recommendation to emphasize arts, culture and history in schools. 

The New Hampshire economy still is a good-news-bad-news scenario, athough a lot more good lately.  Unemployment ticked down in July, to five point-one-percent. Foreclosures ticked down as well, while home sales are roaring. But in the business world, a recent national study finds New Hampshire lagging in new business start ups, and construction is still sluggish.  We’ll look at the economy from all sides and what the future may hold.

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Cities and towns around New Hampshire have been working to revitalize and even resurrect their central cores, renovating abandoned buildings, creating walk-able main streets and affordable housing. We’ll look in on these efforts and also the challenges of financing them, while attracting businesses and others to take up the downtown lifestyle.

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dataflurry via flickr creative commons

As the national economic mood picks up will New Hampshire join the party?  U.S. unemployment is tracking downward, the stock market is going up, and housing trends look strong in many parts of the country. Meanwhile, here in the Granite State, the recovery’s been steady but lackluster. We’ll look at where the economic promise and perils may be found, moving forward.  

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Designing Downtowns

Apr 11, 2013

Cities and towns around New Hampshire have been working to revitalize and even resurrect their central cores, renovating abandoned  buildings, creating walk-able main streets and affordable housing. We’ll look in on these efforts and also the challenges of financing them, while attracting businesses and others to take up the downtown lifestyle.

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Via Flickr CC

On Thursday, a House Committee with once again look at a bill for a 15 cent increase in New Hampshire's gas tax.  Supporters say it's high time, the tax hasn't been raised in more than 2 decades and NH's roads and bridges are in serious need of repair.  Opponents however say that this amounts to a 1 billion dollar tax on Granite Staters at a time when the state is recovery slowly from the recession. We'll hear from both sides of this debate.

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A new report from the NH Center for Public Policy Studies shows that one of the biggest challenges facing cities and towns in the Granite State is reductions in state aid, while the demand for public services remains high.  This is even more amplified during our town meeting season as residents sort out what they can truly afford.  But some lawmakers argue that local control means local responsibility for funding these services.  We'll explore the arguments around this debate.

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Euro coins and houses
Images_of_Money / Flickr Creative Commons

To people not directly involved in fixing, analyzing, or monitoring the Eurozone crisis, it can take on the character of black magic.  And it’s easy to think that the dark arts of the European Central Bank’s low-interest lending initiatives, national bond auctions, and bailout talk have little bearing on our daily lives.

In fact, they very much matter.