New Hampshire economy

NH Division of Resource and Economic Development

During a previously unannounced trade mission to Montreal, Governor Chris Sununu spoke warmly on Monday about hundreds of years of economic ties between Quebec and New Hampshire.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

After 20 years of racing, Loudon is losing one of its biggest economic engines.

Track owners announced this week that the annual September NASCAR event held at New Hampshire Motor Speedway will be relocated to Las Vegas. The town will still host a mid-summer race, but local businesses are bracing for the impact.

Allegra Boverman; NHPR

Both President Trump and Governor Sununu released details about proposed budget plans within the last few weeks, so we'll discuss the impacts of these plans, including increased defense spending, and more funds for managing the opioid crisis. We'll also look at current wage and unemployment statistics in the state, and how Granite Staters feel about their economy. 


Kandy Jaxx / Flickr

New Hampshire’s unemployment rate held steady at 2.7 percent for January, with modest job gains across a number of sectors.

New Hampshire’s unemployment rate fell one-tenth to 2.6 percent in December, capping off a strong year for most sectors of the state’s economy.

The final jobs report of 2016 from New Hampshire Employment Security finds that nearly 16,000 more residents had jobs than at the start of the year, and that those jobs came in a variety of sectors.

Current Population Survey, © 2016 by Barry T. Hirsch and David A. Macpherson

New Hampshire lawmakers are again debating Right-to-Work laws, with bills currently moving through both the House and Senate. With Republican majorities in both chambers, and a newly-elected governor who favors Right-to-Work, the policy stands its best chance of passing in more than a decade.

But Right-to-Work isn’t exactly a kitchen-table kind of issue. If you aren’t in a union, or a large business owner, you may not know much about its history, what Right-to-Work does, or why it matters.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

The United States is one of few countries in the world that doesn't guarantee paid family leave for workers. Four states have voted to adopt their own family leave policies in recent years, and Representative Mary Gile of Concord has been working to put New Hampshire on that list.

NHPR Staff

During the campaign, Governor-elect Chris Sununu said he would make attracting companies to the state a top priority. He also promised to meet with 100 business leaders in his first 100 days in office. 

In a speech this week, Sununu says the current administration hasn’t worked hard enough to attract firms, and criticized officials for failing to land a big one, General Electric.

The Republican’s comments on the year-old General Electric decision seemed to come out of the blue.

Sheryl Rich-Kern

By all accounts, commercial and residential construction is on the rebound in New Hampshire. But many general contractors say an aging workforce limits how much the market can grow.

Todd Bookman for NHPR

The term “apprentice” may conjure up thoughts of reality television and a certain President-elect, but actual apprenticeships--where workers learn skills on the job--are on the rise nationally. And in New Hampshire's health care industry, apprentices are being used as a way to fill a gap in the workforce.

NHPR

Year-end reports show positive trends: from very low unemployment to the addition of 17,000 jobs in 2016. However, rental prices continue to rise, and while the Granite State has plenty of jobs, it badly needs people to fill them.

Ryan Caron King | NENC

It’s hard to avoid the hand-wringing about aging demographics in New England these days. The region's six states have the six lowest birth rates in the country. Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont have the oldest populations in the country, and Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts aren't far behind.

Kandy Jaxx / Flickr

The state’s unemployment rate remains the lowest in the nation, dipping to 2.7% in November.

New data from the New Hampshire Department of Employment Security show the state lost 380 jobs last month, but that was offset by a shrinking labor force.

Todd Bookman, NHPR

The machinery inside Conner Bottling Works doesn’t sparkle like it used to. In fact, everything and everybody in here look like they could use a break.

“We are the last family-owned independent bottler in the state of New Hampshire,” says Dan Conner, the fifth generation to work here. “153 years, from start to today. Never shut down, never stopped.”

Launched in 1863, the first Conners only bottled beer, but in the 1890s, the company branched out into sodas. During prohibition, harder drinks were made out back, a friendly sheriff reportedly looking the other way.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

New projections for the labor market what skills will be needed in the Granite State. Governor-elect Sununu's business experience has grabbed the attention and hopes of business owners. Concern is rising about New Hampshire's poorly funded public employee retirement plans. 


New Hampshire’s job market continues to show signs of strength.

The state added 620 jobs last month, pushing the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate down a tenth of a point to 2.9 percent. Since the start of the year, gains have been made across most sectors of the economy, from leisure and hospitality to education and manufacturing.

N.H. Economic News Roundup: Winners and Losers

Sep 9, 2016
NHPR

We examine winners and losers in today's Granite State economy. We look at differences between northern and southern New Hampshire, residents with college degrees and without, and the future of various sectors such as technology, health care and manufacturing.


If you’ve spent any time following the Republicans running for governor this year, you’ve probably heard plenty of talk about the need to jumpstart New Hampshire’s economy.

Wendy Nelson / Flickr/CC

We're talking with millennials from the state for an update on whether and why more young adults are leaving the New Hampshire than coming to it, and what it means for the economy.

  This program was originally broadcast on 3/10/16.

  

tinafranklindg / flickr cc

We examine several key indicators and their impact on the Granite state.  One is rising inflation.  Another is consumer debt:  Americans are spending more, but we're also borrowing -- to the tune of nearly one trillion dollars.  Also, a new report finds a worrisome trend: business formation in small towns and rural counties has dropped dramatically.

NHPR

After years of little to no growth in wages, Granite State workers may see their paychecks fatten.  Spring has sprung for the construction industry, especially on the Seacoast and in the Manchester area.   And a national ranking finds what many New Hampshire parents already know:  child care here is among the priciest in the nation.

Amanda Loder, StateImpact New Hampshire

It seems like a simple question: Overall, have free-trade agreements (like NAFTA) been good news or bad news for the Granite State?

The answer, according to the experts and others who weighed in during The Exchange, isn’t so straightforward.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

It's been fifteen years since the state's unemployment rate was down this far - at 2.7%: good news, but there's concern a tight labor market makes it tough for employers to find workers.  We'll look at that, as well as improvements in the housing market, especially for sellers, and the local impact of global turmoil.

Another Look at Commuter Rail in N.H.

Mar 8, 2016
lzcdome / Flickr/CC

For years, advocates of commuter rail have pushed the idea of a passenger train connecting Boston with at Nashua and Manchester, and even possibly Concord. But commuter rail has always bumped up against one huge, seemingly immovable object:  money.  It's not cheap to build such a system,  roughly two-hundred-million dollars - and so the argument has long been that it's just not worth it, given all the other priorities New Hampshire has, including roads and bridges that need repair.  However, this year, supporters are continuing their efforts, bolstered by rising business backing in the Southern Tier.  And just recently,  they urged a House Committee to keep four million dollars in the state's transportation plan to fund rail study and planning. 

In Manchester Tuesday, executives for the ride-sharing company Uber urged lawmakers to pass a measure that would create statewide regulations for the company's drivers.

The push comes in response to differences across New Hampshire cities in how drivers are regulated. Portsmouth requires Uber drivers to have insurance and undergo city-approved background checks. 

And in Manchester a proposal would require city licensing and random drug and alcohol screenings. 

Allegra Boverman / Flickr/CC

Many analysts seem to be taking the stock markets recent swings in stride, saying the broader U.S. economy is on stronger footing.  Still, there are concerns, especially China's economic woes.

GUESTS:

ULI Terwilliger Center for Housing / Flickr/CC

We're looking into New Hampshire’s affordable housing problem: how it happened, what’s changing, and what the obstacles are to fixing it.

GUESTS

  • Dean Christon – executive director of the New Hampshire Housing Finance Authority
  • Dennis Delay– economist at the New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies and co-author of a new three-part report commissioned by the New Hampshire Housing Finance Authority.

CALLOUT

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr / Creative Commons

The unemployment rate is below four percent in New Hampshire and the labor force is growing, but some say our overall economic growth is still falling short. We’ll find out more looking at demographics, trade, the political climate, housing and healthcare.

A New Normal?: N.H.'s Post-Recession Economy

Jan 14, 2015
Philip Long / Flickr/CC

Although the state has regained all the jobs it lost in the Great Recession, many are said to be part-time or lower paying.   Still, the U.S. economy seems to be on a roll, and optimism appears to be taking hold. We’re looking at who’s faring well and why in the Granite State, and who’s been left behind.

GUESTS:

The Economic Impact Of Substance Abuse In N.H.

Dec 17, 2014
Joe Shlabotnik / Flickr/CC

On top of individual suffering, a recent report finds alcohol and drugs also take a toll on workforce productivity and the state’s fiscal well-being -- to the tune of nearly two billion dollars.  The authors say policy makers and business leaders should consider addressing this as way to help bolster the state’s economy.

GUESTS:

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