NH Budget

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

 

When Governor Sununu unveiled his $12 billion state budget last month he stressed some priorities: full-day kindergarten, money to hire more state troopers, and a fund to help cities and towns pay for road and school projects.

Emily Corwin/NHPR

The Senate Finance Committee Wednesday OK’d a bill that would give nearly $37 million to cities and towns to fix local roads and bridges.  

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

House budget writers heard six hours of public testimony last night regarding the state’s upcoming two-year spending plan.

The dozens of people who spoke mainly focused on funding for services for developmental disabilities, substance abuse and mental health.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Members of the public get a chance to weigh in on the proposed 2-year state budget this afternoon at the Statehouse.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Although recent numbers show the number of people waiting for developmental disability services in New Hampshire is lower than a few months ago, the state’s Health and Human Services Commissioner says there’s still a long ways to go in fixing this chronic problem.

Allegra Boverman; NHPR

Both President Trump and Governor Sununu released details about proposed budget plans within the last few weeks, so we'll discuss the impacts of these plans, including increased defense spending, and more funds for managing the opioid crisis. We'll also look at current wage and unemployment statistics in the state, and how Granite Staters feel about their economy. 


Allison Quantz for NHPR

The New Hampshire Hospital Association says a federal court ruling last week means state budget writers owe hospitals $80 million on top of what the governor has already proposed. But the head of the house finance committee disagrees. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Members of the public will have a chance to weigh in on the state's spending priorities at a pair of hearings Monday.

The House Finance Committee is hosting a public hearing on the state budget Monday at Derry Town Hall at 4:30. Another hearing gets underway at 5:30 at the Silver Center for the Arts at Plymouth State University.

This comes as House budget writers are in the process of revising Governor Chris Sununu's proposed $12.1 billion spending plan.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

House budget writers will have less money to work with than Gov. Chris Sununu did in crafting the next two year state spending plan. 

Ed Bolton/FLICKR

House finance members are continuing to draft their version of the next two-year state budget – a process involving hundreds of pages and thousands of individual spending items.

But some budget items take up a little more time than expected.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It’s a quiet week at the Statehouse this week, but not for budget writers.

House Finance members will continue to meet with state department reps as they work to finish up their version of the state's new two-year spending plan. 

Brainlesssteel via Flickr CC

The University of New Hampshire has announced a new scholarship program that will allow some in-state students to attend the university tuition-free.

Beginning next fall, UNH will offer free tuition to New Hampshire students who qualify for federal Pell Grants. The scholarships will go to around 285 incoming freshman and will cost the University roughly $300,000.

The announcement comes as lawmakers in Concord debate how much state support the University system should receive in the next budget.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu presented his $12 billion, 2-year state spending proposal to House and Senate budget writers for the first time Tuesday.

A Conversation With Governor Chris Sununu

Feb 13, 2017
Allegra Boverman; NHPR

We sit down with Governor Chris Sununu. The new governor delivered his first budget on Thursday, boosting spending in many areas. We'll talk about that -- and about the Governor's plans for workforce development, reducing energy costs, and Medicaid expansion. We'll also get his take on President Trump's recent claims of widespread voter fraud in New Hampshire. 


CREDIT MIKE ROSS, UNH

Officials with the state University System are registering their disappointment with Governor Chris Sununu’s proposal not to increase state funding for New Hampshire’s public universities.

The University System of New Hampshire requested an increase of about 12 million dollars over the next two fiscal years. They said the increase would allow them to keep tuition flat for in-state students.

Hannah McCarthy for NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu delivered his budget address Thursday, outlining his priorities as the state Legislature kicks off its biannual budget writing cycle.

NHPR's newsroom has been reporting on what to expect this budget season — you can find a rundown on that right here — and now, we're offering more context on the things Sununu mentioned in the budget address itself.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 10, 2017

Feb 9, 2017

We discuss the implications for the state following Governor Chris Sununu's address outlining his two-year spending plan.  A N.H. house committee voted against passage of Right-to-Work legislation; the bill goes to the full house next week.  A paid family and medical leave bill won’t be voted on this year, despite community and bipartisan support. And a new report says Manchester's drug problem is still serious but efforts to address it are working.


NHPR Staff

Governor Chris Sununu delivers his budget proposal to lawmakers this week. It’s the first step in a months-long journey to build a two-year spending plan that will affect nearly every aspect of life in New Hampshire.

To help you prepare for the months of headlines to come, NHPR reporters are highlighting areas of the budget that are likely to generate the most discussion.

 

No one has ever called crafting a state budget easy. There are thousands of decisions and myriad competing interests. And for a new governor, there is also the crunch of getting it all done and printed a mere six weeks after taking office.

But if Gov. Chris Sununu is at all anxious about his final product, he isn’t showing it.

N.H.'s Biennial Budget Process

Feb 8, 2017

We examine how New Hampshire crafts it's two-year spending plan, which kicks off with the Governor's budget address.  In the next few months,  a lot will happen both in public forums and behind the scenes. State spending and revenues will dominate the discussion, as well as which services will receive funding and which will see cuts.  


U.S. Navy Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel Viramontes, Wikimedia Commons

Adults with developmental disabilities in New Hampshire have long struggled to find adequate support once they leave the school system. This legislative season, lawmakers will vote on a bill that would give a 2% raise to workers who care for these Granite Staters - with the aim of boosting the workforce serving this population.  

Petty Officer 2nd Class Tiarra Fulgham; Wikimedia Commons

Adults with developmental disabilities are provided government assistance, including services they used to get from the school system as children. But for years, there's been a waiting list for that help, despite political promises and attempts at reform.  We ask why the state keeps falling short for these adults and their families.

Producer's Note: Read our additional coverage of this show. 


Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Due to what he says is a projected budget shortfall, Gov. Chris Sununu is calling on state commissioners to hold off on new hiring for the next six months. 

Daniel S. Hurd via Flickr CC

 

  New Hampshire's chief accountant is resigning three years before his term ends, giving Republican Gov. Chris Sununu another key appointment in his first term.

Comptroller Gerard Murphy is leaving at the end of January when the state's comprehensive annual financial report is completed. The comptroller handles all statewide financial reporting, including monitoring state revenues, which determine how much money the state has to spend.

Murphy is taking the job of associate vice president for finance at Keene State College.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State financial experts say New Hampshire is starting the year off in better fiscal health than expected. That’s good news for lawmakers charged with crafting the next two-year state budget.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

With the election season over, lawmakers' focus now turns to crafting New Hampshire’s next two-year budget.

State agencies begin presenting their spending proposals to legislators Friday morning. It will be the first time Governor-Elect Chris Sununu will outline his plans to budget writers.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Citing strong state revenue numbers, Governor Maggie Hassan is calling on Republican leaders to act on a number of spending priorities. But top Republicans say much of what the governor seeks is already in the works.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

As the sunset for New Hampshire's Medicaid expansion approaches, state legislators are debating how best, or whether, to extend the program. And while the prospect of dropping 47,000 Granite Staters who receive this coverage is daunting, some lawmakers are worried about how to fund it when federal support decreases.

NHPR Staff

Gov. Maggie Hassan said Monday she is running for the U.S. Senate, setting up a long-anticipated contest against incumbent Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte. 

After a long battle in Concord, the state’s business tax rates are now set to drop starting next year, the first such cut in more than a decade.

But the question of whether these cuts will succeed in luring new businesses to New Hampshire doesn't yet have a clear answer.

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