NH Constitution

Courtesy U.S. Customs and Border Protection

A judge in New Hampshire says evidence obtained by drug-sniffing dogs during last summer’s U.S. Customs and Border Protection checkpoints in Woodstock is not admissible in state courts.

The order throws the prosecution's cases against more than a dozen legal residents into question.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 20, 2018

Apr 20, 2018

Legislators find the state may be on the hook to pay a lot more money to hospitals for people with no insurance or for those on Medicaid.  A proposed constitutional amendment that would give crime victims more rights gets hung up in a House committee.  And the state emphasizes cost and competition in its new energy plan. 

A proposal to amend the state constitution is stirring debate among lawmakers and legal experts in New Hampshire.

The so-called Marsy’s Law amendment would insert specific rights for crime victims into the state constitution.

As NHPR’s Jason Moon reports, a well-financed campaign has brought the same debate to more than a dozen other states at the same time.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu and a bipartisan group of legislators will officially kickoff the campaign for a new amendment to the New Hampshire Constitution at the State House on Tuesday.

Courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Last summer, US Customs and Border Patrol Agents set up an immigration checkpoint on I-93 in Woodstock, New Hampshire. 

Agents detained undocumented immigrants, and they also turned over evidence of illegal drug possession by eighteen American citizens to the Woodstock Police Department and the State Police for prosecution at the state level.