NH Democratic Party

The strange and bitter Democratic primary in the first congressional district got even stranger and more bitter today.

NHPR Staff

Sure, the prospect of being a delegate to a national political convention has always been a big deal — but it's usually also kind of a formality.

By the time a convention rolls around, parties typically know who’s gathered enough support to earn the nomination, according to whatever rules they’ve established in advance.

Not so in 2016.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

The Democratic Party is facing pushback over its rules around super-delegates, as voters question whether the system will end up hindering Bernie Sanders’s chance at the nomination despite the results of the popular vote in New Hampshire's primary.

Logan Shannon for NHPR

Bernie Sanders’ win in the New Hampshire Primary last week shook up the Democratic presidential race.

But what might that victory mean for state-level Democratic politics in New Hampshire, where Sanders’ unapologetically liberal style stands in stark contrast to the more cautious approach favored by the state’s Democratic leaders?

Kate Harper for NHPR

The New Hampshire Republican Party wants the state's Democratic superdelegates to support Vermont U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders in his bid for the party's presidential nomination.

Natasha Haverty for NHPR

On Sunday, New Hampshire’s Democratic Party hosted its annual Jefferson Jackson dinner. All three Democratic presidential candidates spoke to the sold out crowd in Manchester’s Radisson Ballroom. Hillary Clinton closed out the night. More so than Sanders or O’Malley, her speech called on time spent here in the Granite State. 

portraits of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson
Rembrandt Peale, courtesy White House Historical Association/Thomas Sully, courtesy US Senate

 This Sunday New Hampshire’s Democratic Party hosts its annual Jefferson Jackson dinner. 

Presidential candidates Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and Martin O’Malley will all be there Sunday, joining Governor Hassan and Senator Shaheen at Manchester’s Radisson Ballroom. The event is sold out.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

New Hampshire Democrats gathered Saturday in Manchester for their state party convention. With five of the party’s six presidential hopefuls as featured speakers, Democrats are far from settled on who their nominee will be. But the party faithful appear happy with how their nominating process is playing out.

portraits of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson
Rembrandt Peale, courtesy White House Historical Association/Thomas Sully, courtesy US Senate

New Hampshire Democrats are set to take up a question several other state parties have considered in recent weeks: should the party rename its annual Jefferson-Jackson Dinner?

Spokesperson Lizzy Price says state party chair Ray Buckley brought the question to the party's executive committee, which referred it to another panel. That committee, Price says, will "discuss the issue and offer any recommendations back to the executive committee."

Emily Corwin for NHPR

Top Democrats rallied volunteers and worked the phones Monday in Portsmouth. Their goal was to call attention to the US Supreme Court’s “Hobby Lobby” ruling, which found a closely held company could not be forced to pay for all birth control procedures required by the Affordable Care Act.

Democrats hope Supreme Court rulings like the Hobby Lobby and the striking down of Massachusetts’s abortion clinic buffer zone law will motivate women voters, helping the party overcome certain challenges.

The state’s highest court has unanimously upheld a lower court ruling that scuttled  former House Speaker William O’Brien’s lawsuit against the N.H. Democratic Party over automated phone calls that targeted O’Brien without the proper disclosures.

At issue were 394 calls placed by Democrats in 2010.