NH Lottery

The New Hampshire Lottery Commission says it will allow the lottery winner who wants to remain anonymous to start collecting some of her $560 million jackpot, while she awaits a court’s ruling on whether her identity is a matter of public record.

 

In a motion filed Thursday, the lottery commission said it would allow the woman to designate a trust that could collect the money on her behalf — as long as someone brings her winning ticket, photo ID and social security number to a secure location so state officials can make sure she’s eligible. 

  

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 16, 2018

Feb 15, 2018

We parse the Governor's State of the State address for what it might tell us about his agenda for the state in 2018.  EPA chief Scott Pruitt jets into New Hampshire to meet privately about water contamination.  NHPR's Todd Bookman  unpacks allegations made against the NH Liquor Commission. And we follow up on the court battle over the lottery ticket that's been called the "most valuable piece of paper on Earth."  

GUESTS:  

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Lawyers representing the New Hampshire woman who won $560 million playing Powerball were in court on Tuesday, asking a Superior Court judge to let her name be kept secret, despite her having already signed the back of the ticket.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

Lawyers for a New Hampshire woman who won a $560 million Powerball game drawing in January are in court today to try to find a way the winner can remain anonymous. She signed the back of her ticket, which means her identity will be public under state law, according to the New Hampshire Lottery.

Five of the top 10 Lottery jackpots won in New Hampshire, which are all for the Powerball game, were claimed by trusts. Here is the list, sorted by date:

Todd Bookman/NHPR

On Tuesday, a  New Hampshire woman will ask a Superior Court judge to let her cross her name off the back of a $560-million winning lottery ticket. It’s not that she doesn’t want the money. It’s what comes with the sudden wealth that she’s trying to avoid.

The single winning Powerball ticket for the January 6th drawing—the seventh largest prize in U.S. history—was sold at Reeds Ferry Market in Merrimack. But rather than come forward and claim her prize, the winner instead has filed a lawsuit requesting that she get to stay out of the spotlight.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The state Attorney General’s office says disclosing the name of lottery winners in New Hampshire “is not something done for the sake of curiosity or sales promotion,” but instead is a crucial step to ensure the Lottery Commission operates with integrity and accountability.

A Superior Court judge will hear argument next Tuesday in the case of a New Hampshire woman who wishes to remain anonymous after winning a $560 million lottery jackpot.

[You can read NHPR’s previous coverage of this story here.]

A woman who says she has the lone Powerball ticket sold in New Hampshire that matched all six numbers for a $559.7 million jackpot wants a court order allowing her to stay anonymous. 

"Jane Doe" filed a complaint last week in Hillsborough Superior Court in Nashua saying she signed the back of the ticket following the Jan. 6 drawing. She contacted a lawyer and learned that if she had written the name of a trust, instead, she could've shielded her identity. 

The New Hampshire resident says she made a "huge mistake." She hasn't turned in the ticket yet. 

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Keno sales in New Hampshire have topped $1 million in just over a month.

AP

  The electronic bingo game Keno can be officially played in New Hampshire, as of Friday.

NHPR File

New Hampshire Lottery Director Charlie McIntyre says Granite Staters currently spend about $25 million a year playing keno in Massachusetts.

That is one reason the state is upbeat about a new law that gives cities and towns the option to allow keno gambling. A projected $9 million in revenue will help fund full-day kindergarten.

Voters in eleven cities will weigh that ballot question this fall. But not everyone is so gung-ho about it.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

Budget writers in the N.H. House are eyeing the lottery game Keno as a way to fund full day kindergarten. The state senate has always opposed Keno and Governor Sununu says he's yet to see the details of the plan.

These days lotteries are everywhere. Walk into most convenience stores and you’ll see scratch tickets on sale. Big Powerball payouts stretching across state lines make headlines, but fifty years ago the idea that lotteries were sinful and contributed to society’s moral decay was more widespread than it is today.

You may be surprised to learn that in the 1960s New Hampshire was the first state to launch a legal lottery. It came after a fight involving politicians of opposing sides, religious moralists, mob members, and the FBI.

NH Lottery

  The New Hampshire Lottery is selling a bacon-scented scratch ticket.

The I Heart Bacon Scratch ticket features a $1,000 dollar grand prize and ink which releases the a bacon-like aroma when scratched.

To publicize the release of the ticket, the Lottery will be giving out free bacon in Keene, Durham, Hooksett and Manchester starting on Friday.

The tickets cost $1 a piece and winning tickets will reveal either a heart or a bacon symbol.

Courtesy Photo

A forthcoming book explores the tumultuous history of this first-in-the-nation state-run lottery. Approval for the lottery followed a bitter fight, with opponents warning it could lead to Communism and racketeering.  Now, fifty years later, lotteries are in forty-three states. Still, controversy remains over whether this is the best way to raise revenue.

Little-known facts about the lottery:

The New Hampshire lottery — now in its 50th year — is honoring the former Keene state representative who pushed for it more than sixty years ago.

On Friday, the lottery is celebrating Laurence "Larry" Pickett night at the Keene Swamp Bats baseball game. Pickett worked from 1952 to 1953 to make sure legislation passed making New Hampshire the first state in the nation with a lottery. His lobbying efforts go back even further.

Along with the dedication, Charlie McIntyre, executive director of the lottery, will throw out the first pitch.

The game starts at 6:30 p.m.

Gov. Maggie Hassan has vetoed a bill that barred New Hampshire from disclosing the names of lottery winners.

Hassan said current law recognizes winners' privacy by not requiring disclosure of their names proactively, but she said barring disclosure in all instances weakened public oversight and could lead to corruption.