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Florida residents are recovering from the impact of Hurricane Irma this week. NHPR spoke with former, longtime New Hampshire resident David True last week as he prepared for the hurricane in Daytona.

 

True moved from Portsmouth to Daytona last fall. He now lives on his 40-foot cabin boat with Bella, his rescue German shepherd. 

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley caught up with True by phone Tuesday to see how he's doing in the storm's aftermath.

 

 

  The state committee reviewing Northern Pass has pushed back its deadline to make a decision, but a spokesman for the hydro-electric transmission project tells NHPR, “the end is in sight.”

 

“To use an overused sports analogy,” Martin Murray says, “We’re in the fourth quarter.”

 

Others might say it is overtime.

 

NHPR File

The Nashua Teachers’ Union says teachers might cut back on their responsibilities if the Board of Education doesn’t come to a contract agreement this week.

Teachers started the new school year without a contract. Union president Adam Marcoux says the board has been mostly quiet since mid-June.

Marcoux says teachers may cut back on student field trips, writing recommendation letters or advising organizations without being paid.

Those steps would come Sept. 18. That is, if there is no tentative agreement reached at the next negotiation session.

A social and racial justice group is calling on the Claremont Police Department to be more forthcoming with information about injuries suffered by an 8-year-old biracial boy last month.

Vermont Senator and former presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders will make two stops in the state on Labor Day.

Sanders will start his day with a speech at the annual AFL-CIO breakfast in Manchester. The event, hosted by the New Hampshire chapter of the country’s largest labor union, will also feature New Hampshire Senators Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan, and Representative Annie Kuster.

Later that morning, Sanders will speak at an event at Rollins Park in Concord hosted by the progressive group Rights and Democracy NH.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - August 26, 2016

Aug 25, 2016

Presidential candidates converge on the Granite State: Donald Trump and Gary Johnson visit, as well as 2020 rumored hopeful John Kasich.  An executive council vote regarding New Hampshire Hospital could have major repercussions for health care and politics.  And traffics deaths are way up across the country, especially in New Hampshire.  Dean Spiliotes is our guest host.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup - July 29

Jul 28, 2016

We recap Hillary Clinton's acceptance speech as the first female nominee of a major political party at the Democratic National Committee Convention. Back in New Hampshire, all four GOP gubernatorial candidates endorse Donald Trump and debate the state's handling of the opioid crisis. Meanwhile, a substance abuse treatment facility in Franklin triples its number of inpatient beds.   GUESTS:

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - July 15, 2016

Jul 14, 2016
Sara Plourde, NHPR

Politics dominates our Weekly New Hampshire News Roundup, with Bernie Sanders endorsing Hillary Clinton at an event in Portsmouth this week.  We preview the GOP national convention coming up in Cleveland next week, and check in on a Republican gubernatorial candidates debate.  The U.S. Senate passes the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA).  N.H. Senator Kelly Ayotte and three other sponsors worked on the bill for two years.

GUESTS:

  • Kevin Landrigan - Senior Reporter, New Hampshire Union Leader.
  • Casey McDermott -  digital reporter for NHPR.
  • Dean Spiliotes - civic scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at SNHU and author of the website NH Political Capital.


Dank Depot via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9c93J6

New Hampshire residents hoping to get access to medical marijuana are still waiting for the state’s dispensaries to open

Right now, those new facilities still have to go through a few more rounds of inspections before they can open their doors and start serving patients. Once they do open, patients will only be able to visit one dispensary at a time. And for residents in the northernmost region of the state, the nearest dispensary could be at least two hours away.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

A 64-year-old New Hampshire woman with terminal lung cancer has sued the Department of Health and Human Services over the state’s rollout of its medical marijuana program.

DD via Flickr Creative Commons

A little less than three dozen people showed up to a forum last night in Dover to discuss a proposed medical marijuana dispensary in town – but, for the most part, the crowd didn’t come to push back on the plans.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

It’s hard to find housing in New Hampshire, according to those who spoke at a summit on the issue in Manchester on Friday — but it’s particularly challenging for young professionals, older adults and those with limited incomes.

Addressing this is a key part of ensuring the state’s economic viability in the long run, according to the local officials who spoke at the event.

Brady Carlson for NHPR

Former Senate president Peter Bragdon is no longer executive director of the public risk pool HealthTrust, a job he took in 2013 at the expense of the Senate presidency.

HealthTrust provides health insurance to New Hampshire municipalities and school districts. It was formerly part of the Local Government Center, a risk pool involved in a legal battle with regulators over allegations of mismanaged money. The LGC has since split into HealthTrust and Property-Liability Trust.

UNH Researchers Hone In On Harmful Oyster Bacteria

May 11, 2015
TheBrassGlass / Morguefile

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a new way to detect a bacterium that has contaminated New England oyster beds and made some consumers sick. Dr. Cheryl Whistler is an associate professor of molecular, cellular, and biomedical sciences at UNH and one of the co-developers of this new detection method. She spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 
 

What bacterium does this detect?

 It detects vibrio parahaemolyticus. That’s a hard one to say, so we can just call it V. Para.

Click / Morguefile

In this high-tech information age, farming equipment is becoming more computerized, which means it’s becoming increasingly difficult for farmers to fix their own tools. Enter Farmhack.org, a New-Hampshire based website that’s tilling the Internet for solutions to tricky farm problems. David Brooks, author of the weekly Granite Geek science column for the Nashua Telegraph, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.

So how does Farmhack work?

Flikr Creative Commons / drocpsu

State officials are investigating reports of an international traveler in New Hampshire infected with the measles virus.

The only known public exposure site in New Hampshire was the Flatbread Company restaurant in Portsmouth on April 20 between the hours of approximately 3 p.m. and 6 p.m.

There are no cases identified related to this situation, and New Hampshire is well-protected from widespread measles transmission due to a high vaccination rate.

Cynthiananiokeefe / Morguefile

Attorney General Joseph Foster is advising New Hampshire residents to do their research before making contributions to organizations claiming to provide relief to people harmed by last weekend’s earthquake in Nepal.

Foster is asking donors to consider whether the organization has worked in Nepal before, and whether it has the ability to get aid to the country quickly.

He adds that all organizations that solicit charitable contributions in New Hampshire are required to register as charities with the state Charitable Trusts Unit.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

The New Hampshire Insurance Department is bringing together health care providers and insurers to explore why spending on health care is high and rising, and what can be done to change that.

Taber Andrew Baln via Flickr CC

The Portsmouth City Council is considering a ban on plastic bags. Portsmouth City Councilor Brad Lown is sponsoring the ordinance, on behalf of the New Hampshire Surf rider Foundation's ‘Rise Above Plastics’ campaign. The ordinance would ban single-use plastic bags in the city, and allow stores to pass on a 10-cent per bag fee for using paper bags. 

Tell us why you feel a ban on plastic bags is needed in Portsmouth.

Expert Says Drug Courts Reduce Crime

Apr 17, 2015
Patrick Mansell / flickr Creative Commons

Drug courts in several New Hampshire counties allow some non-violent offenders to avoid jail and treat their addiction. The courts are growing across  the state and earlier this week lawmakers heard from a national drug court expert. Dr. Doug Marlowe is the chief of science, law, and policy for the National Association of Drug Court Professionals. He spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.
 

N.H. Attorney General

  Lawyers for Nathaniel Kibby, who is  charged with kidnapping and sexually assaulting a Conway teenager over the course of nine months, will appear in court today to finalize a trial date.

The 34-year-old Gorham man faces more than 200 indictments in Carroll County where he allegedly kidnapped the then 14-year-old victim and in Coos County where he is suspected to have held and sexually abused her in his mobile home. 

But last month a judge consolidated the charges and assigned the case to Belknap County.

Concord Main Street Project Approved

Jul 31, 2014
Timothy Valentine via Flickr cc

Construction on a $10 million revamp of Concord’s downtown will begin this fall, after the City Council voted 14-1 to approve the project at a meeting this week.

The rebuild and redesign of Concord’s downtown will affect nine blocks of Main Street, from Centre Street to Concord Street.

At-Large City Councilor Fred Keach says the goal is to keep disruption during construction to a minimum for downtown businesses.

NNECAPA Photo Library via Flickr cc

Employees at Market Basket supermarkets across New England have entered their fifth week of protesting the ousting of former CEO Arthur T. Demoulas. While workers continue to attend their shifts, customers are encouraged to boycott the chain by shopping elsewhere. Facing depleted shelves and “Save Artie T.” fervor, Concord shoppers are forgoing Market Basket bargains in favor of pricier groceries.

Meriam Ibrahim Leaves Sudan, Arrives at Vatican

Jul 24, 2014
Courtesy of Gabriel Wani

After a year-long struggle with the Sudanese government, Meriam Ibrahim left Sudan on Thursday.

Alongside her husband Daniel Wani of Manchester and their two young children, Ibrahim flew to the Vatican to meet with Pope Francis today, according to the BBC. Ibrahim was blessed by the pontiff in a private ceremony and is due to return to the states in the next few days.

Wednesday marks one year since New Hampshire became the final New England state to legalize medical marijuana.

Outside the State House in Concord today patient advocates marked the anniversary by saying the state is moving too slowly in making it legal to actually possess it. 

Matt Simon with the Marijuana Policy Project gathered with prospective patients in front of the State House on Tuesday to outline their complaints.

Zillow.com

The home of the second signer of the Declaration of Independence, Josiah Bartlett, is up for sale. Bartlett, a former New Hampshire governor, once lived in the 18-acre estate in Kingston, NH.

The white farmhouse built in 1774 is now up for sale with an asking price of $849,600. Complete with open pasture and wooded areas, the property also has a linden tree that Bartlett brought back from Philadelphia after the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

Map: Does Your Town Allow Fireworks?

Jul 3, 2014
Martin Abbott, Flickr CC

Fireworks are legal in New Hampshire but not permitted in every town.

Related Story: Fireworks Lobby Succeeds In Keeping Controversial Devices On Store Shelves

According to the New Hampshire Fire Marshal’s Office, 18 communities ban fireworks, including cities like Nashua and Berlin and small towns like Madison. Most of the time these restrictions are obeyed without controversy. July fourth though, can be a different story.

www.puitzer.org

One of the most prominent voices in New Hampshire journalism will now lead the committee awarding one of the most prestigious awards in journalism. 

The new administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes, which also recognize  excellence in literature and the arts, is Mike Pride. He served as editor of the Concord Monitor for 25 years, and spent five years before that as managing editor. During that time, the paper won numerous national and regional awards, including a Pulitzer Prise for feature photography in 2008. Mike Pride joins me now to talk about his new job:

Gas Tax Hike Brings Protestors

Jun 30, 2014
Halina Loft, NHPR News

New Hampshire’s per gallon tax on gasoline and diesel is going up 4.2 cents July 1. According to Americans for Prosperity, New Hampshire’s economy will pay a price.

Tom Thomson of Orford was among the protestors the conservative group brought to a Hooksett gas station.

Thomson: The power to tax is the power to destroy. By passing Senate Bill 367, we will at best damage the New Hampshire advantage, and worse see businesses suffer and or close; and that equals loss of jobs.

Michael Webber via Flickr CC

The number of encounters with bears in the White Mountain National Forest is on the rise early this season, prompting rangers to issue early warnings and step up enforcement of safety rules.

Colleen Mainville, a spokeswoman for the national forest, says the black bears are getting bold. One tried to enter a tent while another was searching the back of pickup trucks for food. There are an estimated 4,800 to 5,000 bears in the state.

Most people will never see a bear but when the critters find food, they learn that they can mooch a meal from the two-legged visitors.

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