NH News

Gov. Maggie Hassan has signed a law that strengthens the penalties for financially exploiting the elderly and other vulnerable New Hampshire citizens.

The bill signed Thursday establishes the crime of financial exploitation, which includes intentionally abusing the trust of an elderly or impaired adult to gain access to their money and assets. The law, which takes effect Jan. 1, makes it a crime to use the person's money or assets for personal gain rather than to provide them with food, clothing, shelter and other care.

 Southern New Hampshire University and the New Hampshire Institute of Art are considering a merger.

A memo from SNHU President Paul LeBlanc to the university's faculty and staff says a merger would "instantly expand" SNHU's offerings in the arts and give it a greater presence in downtown Manchester.

For the arts institute, joining SNHU could promote its programs better online and it could benefit from the larger university's marketing and recruitment capabilities. Additionally, NHIA students could access SNHU class offerings and facilities.

Bike Week Looking Bright

Jun 19, 2014

Bike week has arrived in the Granite State once again, and the forecast for the 91st annual rally is bright. And local vendors anticipate a record New Hampshire Bike Week on more than one front.

At first, local vendors were worried about turnout. Last year rain and lower temperatures overshadowed the week.

But, Laconia Bike Week Association director Jennifer Anderson says New Hampshire businesses need not fear:

Division Of The Arts Lands New Director

Jun 16, 2014

New Hampshire will soon have a new director of the Department of Cultural Resources Division of the Arts. Ginnie Lupi comes to the position after serving of the executive director of the ARTS Council of the Southern Finger lakes in Corning, NY. Lupi will take over the position in August. I spoke with Lupi about her appointment as director and her plans for art in the Granite State:

What does the department do and what is your role in the Arts Division?

Gov. Maggie Hassan has vetoed a bill that barred New Hampshire from disclosing the names of lottery winners.

Hassan said current law recognizes winners' privacy by not requiring disclosure of their names proactively, but she said barring disclosure in all instances weakened public oversight and could lead to corruption.

Distant Hill Gardens

The New Hampshire state wildflower is blooming, and with it, the myth that surrounds it: that it’s super rare, and illegal to pick. In fact, the pink and white flower we know as the Lady Slipper is quite common. And picking this flower is completely legal.

“They are not considered ‘rare,’ they are actually common but are listed on the ‘special concerns’ list because they have propagation and climate issues,” according to NH Roots

Steve Wall

Initial coverage by Sam Evans-Brown here.

 A second reward of up to $5,000 is being offered for information leading to an arrest and conviction in two recent loon shootings in New Hampshire.

The reward is being offered through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. An initial reward of $5,000 was offered by The Humane Society of the United States and The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust.

Jimmy Emerson, Flickr CC

New Hampshire lawmakers have passed legislation that includes household pets in orders designed to protect victims of domestic violence.

Wednesday's vote sent the bill to the governor. It expands the orders to include pets in cases involving stalking and domestic violence. The bill would allow judges to grant custody of any domestic pets or farm animals to the victim and issue an order barring the abuser from harming or disposing of the animal.

Supporters argue abusers sometimes take their anger out on a pet or attempt to intimidate victims by targeting a pet.

Teemu088, Flickr CC

New Hampshire's Legislature has approved changing when fuel dealers can contract with customers to buy fuel in advance.

The bill sent to the governor Wednesday is in response to disruptions in home heating oil deliveries this winter by one of New Hampshire's largest fuel companies. The bill prohibits dealers from advertising or soliciting earlier than May 1 for consumers to enter into contracts for the upcoming fuel season. Currently, the contracts can't be offered before Jan. 1.

Consumers could ask to sign contracts before May 1.

Murray Farms

After a spring characterized by strange weather, warmer temperatures have brought gardeners outside- and to their local garden stores- around the Granite State.

“We’re slammed right now. After the long winter and the nice weather we have now, people are coming out in droves.”

Charlie Cole is the General Manager at Cole Gardens, a family owned business in Concord. Like many gardeners at this time, Cole is experiencing a rapid uptick in sales.

Austin Cowan NHPR

We live in an age where Donald Sterlings and Lance Armstrongs often cloud the benefits of sports in the public eye. Alleged abuser and former Rutgers basketball coach Mike Rice gets ample coverage, while the dedicated, supportive coach usually goes unnoticed.

NH Attorney General's Office

It was in August of 1969 when a road crew discovered the partially decomposed body of an adult man in a small pit of water off of I-93 in Salem.

Photo courtesy Christopher Lamb

The 2014 winter Olympics begin on February seventh in Sochi, Russia. Until this week, talk about the games focused on worries that there might not be enough snow, and international criticism and threats to boycott the games because of Russia’s law banning what it called “homosexual propaganda.” On Monday, President Vladimir Putin reversed course and said that everyone will be welcome to Sochi. As to the snow, there are no certain answers.

The House voted to send its budget to the state Senate.   The governor has unveiled her choice for a new Attorney General.  The first Exeter-Hospital Hepatitis-C civil cases are now scheduled for trial.  And the Windham school board “takes aim” at dodge ball.  We’ll look at the top stories for the week of April 1st.

Guests:

House budget writers this week got closer to a final tax-and-spending plan.  The Stand-your-Ground debate is stirring up in the legislature.  A moratorium on wind farms was proposed and New Hampshire lost a statesman…former House Speaker Harold Burns.   A roundtable of reporters discusses the top stories of the week. 

Guests

Attorney General Michael Delaney announced this week he’s stepping down. Meanwhile, the New Hampshire House has been a hive of activity” with votes in favor of medical marijuana and a higher tobacco tax…while soundly rejecting one casino gambling bill. Will check in with those stories and others that happened in the Granite State this week with a new weekly feature on our show, the New Hampshire News Roundup.

Guests:

Josh Rogers - NHPR’s State House reporter, Senior Political Reporter and Editor

A lot of news is happening in New Hampshire this week.  At the Statehouse there have been votes on if New  Hampshire should expand gambling, also a tussle on the gas tax and the House is looking to increase the cigarette tax.  Also members of the House Finance Committee are about to hit the road to get the reaction of Granite Staters on the Governor's budget and New Hampshire lost a entrepreneur and philanthropist this week, Manchester's May Gruber. We'll talk about the biggest stories this week in New Hampshire with a roundtable of reporters.

Guests

Michael Brindley, NHPR

  U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen wants to lift the Congressional ban on earmarks, imposed under Republican leadership in 2010.

Shaheen says earmarks, often criticized as so-called pork spending, were a useful way for lawmakers to target money to projects in their home states.

When they were in effect, Shaheen says taxpayers could find information online about who was requesting the money and where it was going. Now, she says under the ban those decisions about spending are left to the administration.

 

Passing a voter identification law has been a priority for Republicans in Concord, but the House and Senate differed on how tough to make its requirements. The Senate supported accepting college IDs, for instance. The Senate also wanted to allow people to vote without identification if local election officials knew who they were. The House meanwhile favored allowing only government-issued IDs. It also favored  to force voter without IDs to have their picture taken before getting a ballot.

In the end, both sides got some of what they wanted.

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