NH News

New Hampshire candidates competing in the September primary can now sign up to get on the ballot.

The filing period for state, county and federal offices opens Wednesday and ends June 13.

The primaries will be held Sept. 9. The general election is Nov. 4. This year's top contests include the governor's race, a U.S. Senate race and the two U.S. House races.

New Hampshire State Police have safely arrested an armed man sought in an area of southern New Hampshire near the Massachusetts border after an earlier confrontation with police at his home.

Maj. David Parenteau said Tuesday night that officers found 44-year-old Anthony Reardon back in his South Hampton home about five hours after they had condoned off the nearby area with a large police presence.

Parenteau said the first officers who came to his home Tuesday afternoon found Reardon with weapons he refused to surrender.

Amid Criticism, Hassan Defends Overseas Trade Mission

Jun 3, 2014

Gov. Maggie Hassan's office said canceling a planned trade mission to Turkey would cost taxpayers $10,000 and the private businesses that will accompany the governor would lose thousands more.

In a written response to a public-records request by the conservative nonprofit Citizens for a Strong New Hampshire, Hassan's chief of staff Pamela Walsh said "non-refundable travel arrangements" had already been paid for when the governor announced a freeze on hiring and out-of-state travel.

HealthTrust, Property-Liability Trust, and NH Municipal Association office
Amanda Loder / NHPR

Former Local Government Center insurance pool Property-Liability Trust will return $17 million in illegal subsidies.  This despite earlier protests that it didn’t have the money on hand.  The money will go to another former LGC insurance pool--HealthTrust—and then be refunded to member communities. 

For years, Property-Liability Trust struggled, and was supported by the Health Trust program, which raised funds by over-charging member communities. 

Sean Marshall via Flickr CC

Administrative Services Commissioner Linda Hodgdon said Tuesday that May's revenues were about $3 million below estimates, mostly because $2.6 million the state thought it would get during the month came in April instead.

Hodgdon said May is a small tax collection month and can't be used to pinpoint trends. She said officials will be better able to tell if a trend is developing once tax receipts are in for June, a significant tax collection month.

Brainlesssteel via Flickr CC

The University of New Hampshire says close to 3,400 first-year students are entering the school this fall — its largest incoming class ever.

This year's first-year class saw an increase of 7 percent in the number of in-state students over last year, up to over 1,400. President Mark Huddleston says UNH attributes that at least partially to the restoration of state funding that allowed the school to freeze in-state tuition for two years.

Previously, the largest class to enter the university was in 2006 with 3,079 students.

The first day of classes is Sept. 2.

New Hampshire residents have one more day to register to vote in the September primary elections.

Tuesday is both the last day for new voter registration and the last day those already registered can change their party affiliations. Undeclared voters may vote in either the Republican or Democratic primaries.

The primaries will be held Sept. 9. Candidates can start signing up to get on the ballot Wednesday. The filing period ends June 13.

NHPR Staff

Lawmakers in the House and Senate this week will consider a deal between the state and hospitals on the Medicaid Enhancement Tax.

The deal, largely brokered by Governor Maggie Hassan, pulls 25 of the state’s 26 hospitals out of a lawsuit.

Two Superior Court judges had ruled the tax in its current form unconstitutional, and a ruling is pending before the state Supreme Court.

As NHPR’s Josh Rogers reports, the deal isn’t being seeing a positive step by all.

Wet Summer
BEV Norton / Flickr Creative Commons

State lawmakers will vote this week on whether to accept a deal that would give 18 towns about $540,000 in back tax payments.  A state House and Senate committee of conference approved a measure addressing back payments from Massachusetts to towns along the Merrimack and Connecticut River watersheds on Friday. 

NHPR / Michael Brindley

A third-party study has determined the east side of Nashua's Greeley Park  would be the best place for a playground that has sparked two years of debate.

Courtesy of Gabriel Wani

  The BBC reported Saturday that the Sudanese woman sentenced to death for apostasy, Meriam Ibrahim, will be released in the coming days. The report was based on a statement made by a high-ranking Sudanese foreign minister who reportedly said Ibrahim would be released from prison in a few days’ time. I caught up with the Ibrahim’s brother-in-law Gabriel Wani of Manchester.

Sitting in his living room, Gabriel Wani anxiously phones his brother Daniel, Ibrahim’s husband, to see if she will be released.

House and Senate negotiators have reached agreement on changing when fuel dealers can contract with customers to buy fuel in advance.

The bill is in response to disruptions in home heating oil deliveries this winter by one of New Hampshire's largest fuel companies. The bill prohibits dealers from advertising or soliciting earlier than May 1 for consumers to enter into contracts for the upcoming fuel season. Currently, the contracts can't be offered before Jan. 1.

Consumers could sign contracts before May 1 at their request.

New Hampshire’s Senators say Veterans Affairs Secretary Erik Shinseki’s decision to step down was the right one.

Senator Kelly Ayotte says that more needs to be done to address the waitlist problems in VA medical centers but Shinseki’s resignation is a positive first step.

“We need to make sure that those who have committed the falsifying of records and misleading people should be fully pursued and prosecuted.”

Daniel S. Hurd via Flickr CC

The deal hinges on a guarantee that hospitals will get more money for the care they provide.

It calls for payments for charity and uncompensated care to be no less 75 percent of costs at rural, so-called critical access hospitals,  and be as much as 50 percent at other hospitals. New London Republican Bob Odell helped broker the deal.

"This is not a perfect solution, but I think this takes us out of the courtroom for a while, and I think the fact that we have a tax decrease in this, however modest, is very important. So I think we made some progress."

It’s day three of the trial for Seth Mazzaglia of Dover. He’s the man charged with raping and killing UNH student Elizabeth Marriott, and then dumping her body in a river that feeds into the ocean. 

Prosecutors presented eight witnesses Thursday, the second day of the trial,  including a neighbor who said she heard a blood-curdling scream the night Marriott died in Mazzaglia's Dover apartment. 

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012: UNH student Elizabeth (Lizzi) Marriott goes missing. Her last cell phone activity was recorded at approximately 10 PM, when she told friends she was heading to Dover, N.H. 

Thursday, October 11th, 2012: Police start search for Marriott's body on Peirce Island near Portsmouth.

Friday, October 12th, 2012: Lizzi Marriott's family offers a ten thousand dollar reward for information in her disappearance. 

Murray Farms

After a spring characterized by strange weather, warmer temperatures have brought gardeners outside- and to their local garden stores- around the Granite State.

“We’re slammed right now. After the long winter and the nice weather we have now, people are coming out in droves.”

Charlie Cole is the General Manager at Cole Gardens, a family owned business in Concord. Like many gardeners at this time, Cole is experiencing a rapid uptick in sales.

Sheryl Rich-Kern, NHPR

New Hampshire’s first public memorial to the victims of the Holocaust officially opens in downtown Nashua this Sunday.

Unlike many memorials and museums, its funding didn’t come from a committee or a foundation.

Instead, the $150,000 was raised by a single man, former Nashua alderman Fred Teeboom, who was a Jewish child in hiding after the Nazis occupied Holland.

Nearly 70 years after he lived as a hidden child during World War II, Fred Teeboom is on a mission.

The city of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, is a step closer to acquiring ownership of a building that's been under federal control.

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen says she's received a commitment from the U.S. General Services Administration to leave the McIntyre Federal Building and to work with the city to transfer ownership.

The city has long wanted ownership of the building in downtown Portsmouth.

The community college in Concord, New Hampshire, has a new president.

Susan Dunton's experience in college administration, academic affairs and student services spans three decades at Lesley College, the Harvard Divinity School and Fisher College in the Boston area; Bethel University in McKenzie, Tennessee; and Fontbonne University in St. Louis.

She has worked on forming partnerships between community college and four-year research and technical institutions and developed academic programs for workforce needs.

Armchair Tour of Smuttynose's New Brewery in Hampton

May 29, 2014
Emily Corwin / NHPR

Smuttynose Brewing Company's new brewery opens Saturday in Hampton, NH.  Below is an audio postcard in which Smuttynose's "Master of Propoganda," JT Thompson, gives a tour of the $24 million energy efficient brewery, which produces 65,000 barrels of beer each day.

Prospective medical marijuana patients and advocates are urging state health officials to issue registry cards as soon as possible.

New Hampshire's entire Congressional delegation now agrees that Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki should resign.

Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte called on Shinseki to resign a week ago, while the three Democrats — Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, Rep. Annie Kuster and Rep. Carol Shea-Porter — did so on Wednesday.

They were prompted by a scathing new report that found systemic problems in the medical system for military veterans.

Police in Concord, New Hampshire, say someone used lighter fluid to form a swastika in the parking lot outside a human rights group that battles anti-Semitism.

The Lantos Foundation for Human Rights and Justice was named for Congressman Tom Lantos, the only Holocaust survivor elected to Congress. He died in 2008.

Police said the 6-by-6-foot swastika, discovered Wednesday, was never lighted, and the person who formed the symbol walked away.

Ian Sane / flickr, creative commons

  There were more questions than answers Wednesday night at a public information meeting at the Pease Tradeport. There, Officials from the Department of Environmental Services, the City of Portsmouth, and the U.S. Air Force tried to address concerns about a contaminant identified in drinking water on Pease. 

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, or NOAA, announced Wednesday that New Hampshire’s groundfishery will receive more than $2 million in federal disaster funds.

Josh Wiersma, the head of New Hampshire’s groundfish coop, says local ground fishermen, who expected less direct aid, breathed a sigh of relief at the announcement.

Daniel S. Hurd via Flickr CC

New Hampshire will seek a waiver from the federal government Friday hoping to get $275 million more in matching funds over five years for health care services provided by the state, county and local governments.

The joint legislative Fiscal Committee approved the waiver application Wednesday.

Jeffrey Meyers, director of intergovernmental affairs for the Department of Health and Human Services, said the federal government is not sharing the cost of about $80 million in annual health care spending in New Hampshire. The waiver asks the federal government to pitch in.

The murder trial is set to begin for a New Hampshire man who police say raped and killed a 19-year-old college student then dumped her body in a river.

Thirty-one-year-old Seth Mazzaglia of Dover maintains that Elizabeth "Lizzi" Marriott died Oct. 9, 2012, during rough consensual sex. Marriott, of Westborough, Massachusetts, was a student at the University of New Hampshire and had been lured to Mazzaglia's apartment by his then-girlfriend, Kathryn McDonough.

The "Red Raider" logo is staying put at a New Hampshire high school for now.

The student council at Belmont High School held a community forum last month taking comment on whether they should change or retire the black and red graphic of a Native American.

On Tuesday, the Shaker Regional School Board voted down the council's request to change the logo, but encouraged a public vote on the matter at next year's District Meeting.

The idea of changing the name came up after a discussion in a social studies class.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

On Tuesday, U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte threw her support behind fellow Republican Scott Brown, who is running for the state’s other Senate seat.

Brown also picked up endorsements from former Republican governors Steve Merrill and Craig Benson.

Standing before a large crowd of Brown’s supporters in Nashua, Ayotte described the former Massachusetts Senator as a proven leader who will get things done for New Hampshire.

“And I am very proud to stand here today and endorse Scott Brown. Working together, I can assure you we’ll put New Hampshire first,” she said.

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