NH Politics

Former U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte has joined the board of the Rupert Murdoch-owned News Corp, which owns the New York Post, the Wall St. Journal and HarperCollins. 

Kelly Ayotte has kept busy since she left the Senate in January. She's helped the Trump administration introduce Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch to her former colleagues and she's been a fellow at the institute of politics at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

NHPR Staff

Each week, NHPR Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition's Rick Ganley for On the Political Front, a rundown of the week to come in New Hampshire Politics.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A Republican bill adding new requirements for proving voter eligibility has cleared the state Senate along party lines. The measure would require create more stringent verification requirements for people registering to vote close to an election.

FLICKR/ F OHanlon

A bill that would require parents to get advance notice before sex-related course material is taught in the classroom has passed the state Senate and now heads to the Governor.

Allegra Boverman via Flickr/Creative Commons

During an interview on NHPR's The Exchange Tuesday, Governor Sununu insisted that a GOP-led effort to require voters to provide proof they are connected to the community where they vote is not meant to exclude anyone but simply to ensure the integrity of the state's voting process.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

House Speaker Shawn Jasper says it shouldn't be a surprise House Republicans aren't backing Gov. Chris Sununu's plan to spend $18 million in the next two-year state budget to fund full-day kindergarten in New Hampshire.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It's been about a month since N.H. Governor Chris Sununu delivered his budget address, which included $18 million for full-day kindergarten.  The House meanwhile appears to have somewhat different priorities  -- eliminating that funding in its version of the budget.

Scroll down to watch our Facebook Live video stream of Governor Sununu on The Exchange.

We'll get the Governor's take on this development, as well as his views on last week's collapse of the GOP health care bill. And we'll find out how far along he is on achieving his goal of talking with 100 companies in 100 days in hopes of convincing them to come to the Granite State.


Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu’s unpublicized visit to Washington last week included his attendance at a fundraising gala hosted by a pro-Lebanon advocacy group whose website refers to its “access to senior U.S. and Lebanese government officials.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Update: In order to allow our producers ample time to prepare for tomorrow's show, we've stopped collecting additional audience questions for the governor at this time. Thanks to all who submitted your suggestions! Be sure to tune in Monday at 9 a.m. for the full interview.

File photo

New Hampshire state representative Steve Vaillancourt has died at age 65. Vaillancourt had been battling heart problems and was found dead in his apartment Monday morning.

He was serving his 10th term in the State House representing Manchester’s Ward 8.

Representative Neal Kurk, who served several years on the House Finance Committee with Vaillancourt,  said Vaillancourt’s lively personality will be missed.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

New Hampshire lawmakers met Friday to discuss policy changes to better protect at-risk kids. The effort comes on the heels of an outside review that faulted the state’s child protection agency. 

The Child Protection Act applies to cases when there’s clear evidence of child abuse or neglect, but a special legislative commission hopes to introduce a middle step between unfounded and founded reports of abuse. John DeJoie, with Child and Family Services, was part of a group that suggested another option for state health officials.

@GovChrisSununu

When does a tweet cross the line on government ethics?

That’s the question at the center of a complaint filed this week by the New Hampshire Democratic Party, alleging Gov. Chris Sununu’s recent tweet about his day skiing at Waterville Valley Resort — which is owned by his family and, until recently, was managed by Sununu himself — violates state ethics rules.

Michael Brindley

  State Senator Scott McGilvray has died.

The Hooksett Democrat died Wednesday morning, though a cause is not yet clear.

He announced last month he stepping away from his job as president of NEA-New Hampshire, the state's largest teachers union, citing health reasons.

McGilvray worked as an educator in Manchester for 25 years before he was elected to the state Senate in November. He leaves behind a wife and two daughters.

In a statement, Governor Chris Sununu called McGilvray a dedicated public servant.

Nixon Peabody

Gov. Chris Sununu has nominated Gordon MacDonald, a well-known Manchester attorney, to serve as Attorney General. MacDonald's clients include a major opioid maker being investigated by the state.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

There’s plenty of debate in New Hampshire right now around the question of who should be allowed to vote here. A big part of that lies in figuring out when — and why — a person calls New Hampshire their home. Answering that question, however, isn’t always straightforward.

Mike Mozart

Proposed Senate Bill 247 aims to prevent lead poisoning in children by strengthening lead testing requirements for children, and placing stricter requirements on properties containing lead paint. For some families, lead poisoning has caused long-term health problems that sometimes don't appear until years after exposure, and experts think the restrictions are not strong enough. However, landlords worry that the new requirements would be difficult to comply with, and come at a huge cost, and funding will be insufficient. For example, companies like Brady Sullivan are still managing fallout from lead poisoning several years ago that contributed to health problems in children living at their properties. We'll look at all sides of this issue.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire House has voted 187 to 179, along near party lines, to table a bill that would extend anti-discrimination protections to people who are transgender in employment, housing and public accommodations.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Secretary of State Bill Gardner says he would not support legislation if he believed it would hurt voter turnout. And as he sees it, a new bill that would impose new requirements on voters who register within 30 days of an election does not run the risk of doing that.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The top Republican in the New Hampshire House says he fears long-term harm if New Hampshire joins twenty other states – including Massachusetts, Vermont, and Maine – in extending non-discrimination protections in housing, employment and public accommodations to people who are transgender.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire's Republican House leadership is looking to stall legislation that adds protections for transgender people over fears that it would let men use women's bathrooms.

Speaker Shawn Jasper says he's pushing to table the bill at Wednesday's session, meaning it wouldn't be debated. The bill would ban discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations based on someone's gender identity. The same protections already exist based on sex, religion, sexual orientation and other factors.

NHPR Staff

House lawmakers are to set to vote on a bill this week that would add gender identity to the state’s anti-discrimination laws.

NHPR Staff

Republican lawmakers have proposed dozens of individual bills to tighten up New Hampshire election laws this year, but one new proposal coming forward this week would on its own enact a number of changes in what’s required for voters to register and how officials are expected to verify those credentials.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Members of the public can weigh in this week on a bill encompassing several election law changes.

Republican Sen. Regina Birdsell is the prime sponsor of legislation that's up for a hearing Tuesday in Concord.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

House lawmakers have a busy week with back to back session days and dozens of bills on the agenda.

Legislation ranges from a proposed change to  the state’s age requirements for marriage to adding gender identity to state discrimination laws.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

House budget writers will have less money to work with than Gov. Chris Sununu did in crafting the next two year state spending plan. 

Ed Bolton/FLICKR

House finance members are continuing to draft their version of the next two-year state budget – a process involving hundreds of pages and thousands of individual spending items.

But some budget items take up a little more time than expected.

With Republicans in full control of New Hampshire’s State House for the first time in more than a decade, Republicans have been moving quickly to enact policies that have long been on their wish list.

That’s been particularly true in public education.

The state Senate has passed, and then immediately tables, a bill that would increase state funding for school districts that offer full-day kindergarten programs.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu signed his first bill into law Wednesday, repealing the license requirement to carry a concealed gun.

The new law, which takes effect immediately, is the first tangible outcome of Republican control in Concord.

Vox Efx / Flickr Creative Commons

The way Rep. Norman Silber sees it, a party primary is supposed to select the best person who represents the values and platform of that particular political party — and allowing undeclared voters to weigh in allows for too much electoral mischief.

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