NH Primary

woodfin / Flickr/CC

The New Hampshire presidential primary celebrates its 100th birthday next year, and a new book chronicles those many decades, including lots of primary lore. It also examines whether the first primary really has as much power over the nomination process as many believe it to.

  This program was originally broadcast on 9/3/15.

GUESTS:

flickr by liewcf

It’s illegal to leave a prerecorded voicemail for someone on the “do not call” registry — even if the call was placed by a live caller — according to the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

 At Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business Monday afternoon, John Kasich made a point to emphasize his willingness to work across party lines – with a nod to one of New Hampshire’s top Democrats.

Former Democratic Governor John Lynch now works at the Tuck School where Kasich was speaking and introduced the candidate ahead of the event. Kasich, in turn, nodded to Lynch several times throughout his remarks.

Crystal Paradis

Actor and writer Lena Dunham and retired U.S. women’s soccer star Abby Wambach began two days of campaigning for Hillary Clinton on Friday. They join Bill and Chelsea Clinton, Al Franken, and other celebrities crisscrossing the state these days on Clinton’s behalf.

This isn't the first time Carly Fiorina's had to deliver an "elevator pitch" — though, as far as she can recall, this was the first time she's had to give that pitch in an actual elevator.

Carly Fiorina
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In a conversation with NHPR’s The Exchange, Republican presidential candidate and former technology executive Carly Fiorina called for a more aggressive response when other countries wage cyberattacks on the United States.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

New Hampshire’s heroin and opioid epidemic has become a front-and-center issue on the campaign trail – prompting presidential candidates from both parties to answer question after question about what they’d do to fight addiction on a national level.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

The presidential primary trail is taking a rare detour through New Hampshire’s North Country this week.

The three Democratic presidential candidates will take the stage at Saint Anselm College Saturday night for their next debate.

This will be New Hampshire’s first debate of the primary season.

And while polls show a tight Democratic race here in the Granite State, the numbers nationally tell a different story.

GIF created using footage from CNN

 It's been a recurring theme throughout this year's presidential primary race: Early states (like New Hampshire) are losing their clout as candidates run what are essentially nationwide campaign.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

If you’re hosting a party, what kind of music would you play? What kind of food would you serve?

Those are the types of questions Ohio Gov. John Kasich faced recently at one of the more unique series of campaign events during this New Hampshire presidential primary season.

“So what’s your question – who would I invite?” said Kasich, seemingly puzzled by the question of who he would invite to a party he was hosting.

“Who would you invite? What would a party look like if you hosted a party?”

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is kicking off a two-day campaign swing through the Granite State.

The Vermont Senator will meet with students at Nashua Community College Monday afternoon. That will be followed by a town hall meeting in Hollis at 5:30.

And Tuesday evening, Sanders will open a campaign office in Rochester, and is set to hold another town hall meeting in Hampton.

Republican candidates will be in Las Vegas early this week for the next GOP debate Tuesday.

File photo by Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Donald Trump says he feels guilty for never serving in the Vietnam War because he knows many brave people who did.

Trump's comments came during a Tuesday night event in New Hampshire that offered a more intimate exchange than his typical rallies. He opened the floor for questions and at times kept the audience near silence as he discussed where his patriotism comes from and what advice he'd give to young people.

 

Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida says radical jihadists are using the refugee crisis as a cover to send terrorists to the West and that it's impossible for the United States to vet some Syrian migrants.

NHPR Staff

 

Hillary Rodham Clinton unveiled the first piece of a new jobs agenda on Sunday, promising hundreds of billions of dollars in fresh federal spending in an effort to compete with the liberal economic policies of her primary challengers.

 

Presidential campaigning is back in full post-Thanksgiving swing in New Hampshire, with former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie heading to the state for events.

O'Malley kicks off Monday with a tour of Velcro Companies in Manchester. He'll then host a town hall in North Conway and a meet-and-greet in the late afternoon in Somersworth. O'Malley's 3-stop tour comes after his speech Sunday night at the state Democratic party's annual dinner.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

On the last day for candidates to file for the New Hampshire presidential primary ballot, Vermin Supreme, known for campaigning with a massive boot on his head, made his third run for President official. This year, Supreme who is from Rockport, Massachusetts, is running as a Democrat. But his platform remains a bit out of the mainstream.

www.brookscullison.com

Almost all the big names have walked through the halls of the New Hampshire Statehouse, strolled into the Secretary of State's Office, and plunked down the $1,000 needed to file for the New Hampshire presidential primary.

  Only Republican Ben Carson is left to file, and he's set to take care of that on Friday, the last day to do so.

Allegra Boverman, NHPR

George Pataki’s polling average in New Hampshire is hovering under one percent, and he was shut out of the most recent "undercard" debate — but he’s not planning to bow out of the race for the Republican presidential nomination anytime soon.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

I don’t expect this will get me invited to many Manchester dinner parties or Sioux City porkfests. But here goes:

It’s time for Democrats to ditch Iowa and New Hampshire’s one-two punch at the front of the party’s presidential nominating calendar.

Phil Roeder / Flickr/CC

We head over to the Hawkeye state - Iowa - to check in on the other "First in the Nation" contest, with Iowa's caucuses coming about a week before New Hampshire's presidential primary next year.  We'll find out what the candidates are saying, and how they're playing, in Iowa. 

 

  • Ben Kiefer -  host of IPR’s daily noon talk show River to River, which he also helps produce.

 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

By the end of next week, all the presidential candidates who want a shot at winning over New Hampshire voters will have swung through the state — at least long enough to file the paperwork to get on the ballot.

A handful of candidates have made a point to stick around, however, some of them following a strategy they’ve employed for months and others giving the state renewed attention in hopes that it might revive somewhat-languishing campaigns.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

For most presidential candidates, getting on the New Hampshire ballot is a fairly straightforward affair: Show up at the State House, bring $1,000 to cover the filing fee, and sign a form affirming  you’re registered with your chosen political party.

For Bernie Sanders, that last part has proven slightly more complicated.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

The presidential candidates who start parading through Secretary of State Bill Gardner’s office this week might do well to pay special attention to the desk that’ll be on display nearby — its original owner is to thank (or blame) for why they’re spending so much time in New Hampshire these days.

Andrew Walsh, NHPR

By now, those on the front lines at the Secretary of State’s office have come to expect two distinct types when it comes to presidential candidates.

There are the ones who treat the ballot filing period like a campaign event. They bring along throngs of supporters and make sure to call ahead to check that they won’t have to share the spotlight with any competitors.

And then there are the ones who just show up.

File photos

It’s unclear when Howard Dean, the former Vermont governor and second-place finisher in the 2004 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary, is planning to return to the Granite State. But it's probably safe to assume he won’t be swinging by Bill Gardner’s office anytime soon.

Associated Press

For as long as New Hampshire has hosted the nation’s first presidential primary contest, it seems outsiders have been trying to dilute the state’s influence. The latest such attempt comes from the Republican National Committee chairman, Reince Priebus.

In an interview with the National Journal, Priebus says he’s been supportive of early nominating states like New Hampshire and Iowa in the past, but “I don’t think anyone should get too comfortable.”

NHPR Staff

A group planning activities to mark the 100th anniversary of the New Hampshire presidential primary is officially kicking off the celebration.

The Presidential Primary Centennial Anniversary Commission was created by the Legislature last year to plan and coordinate events commemorating the first primary, which was held on March 14, 1916. In the early days, it was held on the same day as the traditional town meeting day, but more recently has been moved into February and even January to stay ahead of other states.

Marc Nozell via Flickr / Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/3MY97U

Every four years, New Hampshire welcomes the national political spotlight in the months leading up to the presidential primary. As the hosts of the first primary in the country, Granite State voters have the opportunity to make their voices heard on the campaign trail, at town hall events, and most importantly, at the ballot box.

But it wasn’t always this way.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie didn’t waste much time hitting the campaign trail after declaring his candidacy for the GOP presidential nomination Tuesday morning. Just hours after the announcement at his former high school in his home state, Christie met with voters in New Hampshire.

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