NH Supreme Court

NHPR Staff

The state’s highest court ruled Friday that the family of a then-12 year-old girl cannot sue the Manchester School District for a bullying incident that happened in 2011.

The girl’s family argued that their daughter, who was in seventh grade, was beaten up in the school cafeteria, but that the school failed to notify them that she was being teased earlier that week.

The state’s highest court will release its ruling Friday morning on whether a Manchester family can sue the school district over a bullying incident that happened more than four years ago.

The case involves a then-7th grade girl who got her teeth knocked out in the McLaughlin Middle School's cafeteria by two boys who allegedly teased her. The girl’s mother, Danielle Gauthier, argued this incident could have been prevented if her family had been told about a bullying incident earlier that week.  

NHPR Staff


The New Hampshire Supreme Court has ruled in favor of a couple who attempted to sue Pat's Peak Ski Resort over a chairlift fall, but whose complaint was dismissed for failing to give proper notice.

The court reversed a judge's decision Tuesday and sent the case back for further action.

Deborah and Matthew Hogan reported injuries Feb. 4, 2012. They sent notice to the resort by certified return receipt mail on May 3, 2012, that they retained a lawyer. The resort got it May 10.

NHPR Staff

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has upheld some legislative reforms to the state retirement system, a month after upholding key provisions.

The court on Friday upheld changes to the definitions of "earned compensation" and Cost of Living Adjustments. It ruled the changes didn't retroactively reduce pension benefits earned before a law was passed, and that employees don't have a contractual guarantee that the terms of the plans will never change.

The ruling addressed a lawsuit by the American Federation of Teachers.

NHPR Staff

New Hampshire's Supreme Court will hear two cases at Salem High School as part of its "On the Road" series.

The justices will travel to the school Thursday to hear arguments in cases involving evidence obtained by police during a road-side search and a confession in a burglary case.

Attorney General Joseph Foster and Deputy Attorney General Ann Rice will visit the school Tuesday to brief students about the cases.

Ben McLeod / Flickr Creative Commons

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has ruled four men sentenced to life in prison for murders committed when they were minors should get new sentencing hearings. The decision retroactively applies a 2012 US Supreme Court ruling that deemed mandatory life-sentences for juveniles cruel and unusual punishment.

It would be easy to miss Millsfield. The unincorporated place in the North Country is home to 10 households, many of which are tucked away in the woods, and just two businesses, a bed and breakfast called A Peace of Heaven and the Log Haven restaurant.

“Electricity didn’t show up until the 60s,” said Luc Cote, who’s lived in Millsfield for roughly forty years. “Phone line didn’t come up until mid-60s as well.”