NH Supreme Court

The state’s Division of Motor Vehicles has temporarily stopped issuing new vanity license plates.

New ones won’t be issued until the DMV approves a new set of rules for determining which plates are inappropriate and are rejected.

The DMV was forced to come up with a new process after the state Supreme Court earlier this year sided with a man who wanted the vanity plate “COPSLIE.”

The New Hampshire Supreme Court says the ex-partner of a 12-year-old's girl's mother has made her case to be considered a parent under the law.

The ruling could affect other unwed parents regardless of gender.

The case pitted Madelyn B.'s birth mother, Melissa, against her former partner, Susan. Because it's a custody case, no last names are used.

It would be easy to miss Millsfield. The unincorporated place in the North Country is home to 10 households, many of which are tucked away in the woods, and just two businesses, a bed and breakfast called A Peace of Heaven and the Log Haven restaurant.

“Electricity didn’t show up until the 60s,” said Luc Cote, who’s lived in Millsfield for roughly forty years. “Phone line didn’t come up until mid-60s as well.”

The New Hampshire Supreme Court will hear a challenge to the constitutionality of sex offender registry requirements for convicts whose crimes were committed before the legislature imposed more stringent rules.  Lawyers for "John Doe'' contend the registry requirements amount to new layers of punishment that weren't in place when Doe was convicted in 1987 of sexually assaulting his 14-year-old stepdaughter. The requirements have been overhauled numerous times since 1998.

New Hampshire U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte says she’s pleased with the state Supreme Court's ruling this week to uphold the conviction of Michael Addison

Addison was found guilty and sentenced to death for shooting and killing Manchester police officer Michael Briggs in 2006.

As attorney general, Kelly Ayotte was the lead prosecutor in the Addison case and she featured her role in her 2010 campaign for U.S. Senate.

Ayotte says she expects the court will uphold Addison’s death sentence.

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has issued its ruling in the case of the only man on death row in the state - Michael Addison, who was convicted in 2008 of capital murder for shooting and killing Manchester Police Officer Michael Briggs.

To explain the ruling we turn to Buzz Scherr, law professor at the University of New Hampshire School of Law.  He speaks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson.

b4kedscr0d / Flickr Creative Commons

In a highly-watched decision yesterday, the justices upheld Addison’s conviction of “capital murder” for killing a police officer. But the court said at a later date would it rule on Addison’s death sentence itself. We’ll look at this decision and its possible ramifications.

GUESTS:

  • John Greabe – professor at UNH School of Law, specializing in constitutional law
  • Josh Rogers - NHPR's senior political reporter

CALLOUTS:

The state Supreme Court is set to release its ruling Wednesday in the case of Michael Addison, who was convicted and sentenced to death in 2008 for killing Manchester Police Officer Michael Briggs.

New Hampshire's only death row inmate, Michael Addison, got a very long day in court Wednesday.

New Hampshire's highest court held what may be an unprecedented hearing - more than five hours - to review Addison's trial and his death sentence for the 2006 shooting of Manchester police officer Michael Briggs.

NHPR's Josh Rogers was at the hearing and he tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about the day's events.

On Wednesday, the New Hampshire Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the case of Michael Addison.  Four years ago, a jury found Addison guilty of first degree murder in the 2006 shooting death of Manchester police officer Michael Briggs.  The jury then sentenced Addison to death.

Addison’s lawyers have appealed to the state Supreme Court, and the court will hear a full day of arguments beginning at nine this morning.

N.H. Court Says Police Search Was Unconstitutional

Oct 4, 2012

The New Hampshire Supreme Court is reversing a drug conviction, saying Haverhill police went beyond the bounds of a search warrant to check for guns in a convicted felon's home.

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