NHPR Blogs

NHPR's blogs include:

The Sidebar, NHPR's news blog 

News Primers, The stories behind the headlines. 

Ad Audit, Examining political messages and money.

Foodstuffs, New Hampshire's food and food culture.

Next Gen NHPR, NHPR's intern blog.

From The Archives, Looking back at our coverage of news and culture. 

Inside NHPR, featuring news and events from the station. 

The Audio Orchard, Playlists and performances of hand-picked music.

Live From Studio D, Musicians perform in NHPR's studio for Word of Mouth.

Avital Pinnick / Flicker CC

During Passover, it's best to stock up on matzah early, especially in a state like New Hampshire.

"Jews don't move to New Hampshire for the Jewish community, we move here for other reasons," says rabbi Robin Nafshi of the Temple Beth Jacob in Concord, "the Jewish population of New Hampshire is fairly small."

There was a Stop and Shop in Bedford that used to accommodate kosher shoppers, "It was unbelievable, there was almost two aisles of food for passover," says Katy Gibny from Goffstown. But that store has closed, which has turned Gibni's family to "hunter gatherers."

Brandon Anderson via Flickr CC

In recent decades, the nation’s overall homicide rate has dropped. 2013 - the most recent year for which statistics are available - had the lowest homicide rate, 4.5 deaths per 100,000 people, since 1957.

But as NPR reported earlier this week, about one-third of murder cases go unsolved.

Steve Richardson via Flickr CC

Looking for something  Grade A to do this weekend? After an especially long winter, New Hampshire residents can finally taste the sweet stuff that's become an annual rite of spring: local maple syrup produced in a roadside shack.

NHPR Staff

Do you like the music you hear between segments on Word of Mouth? You can listen to it again on Spotify. Check out and add Word of Mouth's playlist, which we update each week with the latest music we're using on the program.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/cc_chapman/4878972642/in/photostream/" target="blank">CC Chapman</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

The New England Patriots are getting ready for the Superbowl on Sunday, they’ll be playing the Seattle Seahawks for the championship. Eleven years ago they were in a similar position, gearing up for the match against the Carolina Panthers.

From the Archives this week we found this 2004 interview from NHPR’s The Front Porch. Host John Walters spoke with then (and current) State Senator from Manchester, Lou D’Allessandro. John spoke with D’Allessandro about his football career at UNH as well as his 1961 tryout for a new football franchise in Boston.

This week saw the fifth anniversary of the Supreme Court’s "Citizens United" decision. And with the anniversary of “Granny D” day (1/25/12) tomorrow, it seems an appropriate time to take stock.

Do you recall the most famous reindeer of all? What was left out of the song was Rudolph's New Hampshire connection.

When severe weather knocks out power to tens of thousands of homes and businesses, utility crews work around the clock to restore service. But somebody is always going to be the last one to get plugged back in...and it could be you.

If you’re already waiting around for the power to come back on, it’s too late to do prep like charging batteries or buying a generator. But there are some things you can do right now to protect your home and family…and maybe even reclaim some creature comforts.

Rhett Sutphin via Flickr CC

Your dad made it look easy...maybe. But carving a turkey is a bit more complicated than you might think. It's a big bird, after all, and not every knife is created equal. (Nor is every bird, thanks to the "spatchcock" craze!)

But never fear, humble home-chef, there's somewhere to turn if you're confounded by the prospect of carving: YouTube. 

Listed below are some of the most informative and easy-to-follow turkey carving how-to videos on the site.

Pro Tip: Watch them in advance of the family arriving and you'll look like a turkey carving ninja come dinner time.

PumpkinRot

So this week's feature wasn't exactly buried under an inch of dust and parchment mites, but it speaks to the best part of this time of year: telling scary stories. Back in January, Word of Mouth looked into how these stories have made the jump from summer camp and slumber parties to the web.

Paul via Flickr CC

Where I grew up in Connecticut, children trick or treat on Halloween night, after dark, for as long as they possibly can.   I called my hometown’s clerk to double check: municipal government has nothing to do with it.

Yet in my current home of Portsmouth, the city website declares “the date and time for 'Trick-or-Treat' activities in Portsmouth this year will be Thursday, October 30th, from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m.”

As Kansas City finds itself in its first World Series since 1985, its easy to think upon our own championship drought, which ended in 2004.  

It’s been a decade since Boston's boys of summer willed their way out of the American League Championship Series in unlikely fashion and finally put to bed the ghosts of Ruth, Dent, Buckner, Boone (and countless others).

Anyone who’s been paying attention the last few months knows who and what will be appearing on the ballot in a few weeks. (And if you haven’t been paying attention, get off the sidelines already!) 

But how that information gets on the ballots is a process we don’t think much about.

In the run up to the 2004 election, NHPR's Lisa Peakes visited Captial Offset Printing, the company that had printed ballots for the state for decades.

Here's her story from the NHPR archives:

We’re back in school again, and back at the polls. Seemed like a good time to listen back to this conversation on the Exchange from 2009. Laura spoke with a few members of a newly appointed task force to examine the state of civics education in NH.

Children's Museum of NH

Hippo Editor Amy Diaz is back for a look at New Hampshire events this weekend; It's Fest-A-Palooza Two, the Sequel!

For foodies, there's  Greekfest in Manchester, Fire on the Mountain Henniker Rotary Chili Fest, and the Jakarta Fair in Somersworth.

Michael Samuels

Basil has been one of the big draws all summer at Dimond Hill Farm in Concord. 

“We give a sprig away for every customer who buys something,” says Yianna Coliandris, who works at the farmstand.

“Everyone was enjoying that, and it was absolutely thriving. It was beautiful, beautiful basil, and it tasted and smelled absolutely wonderful.”

But now customers will have to find basil elsewhere.

“This was the basil,” says Jane Presby, surveying a tenth of an acre of empty soil.

bagsgroove via Flickr CC

It’s August and vacation season. Gardening Guy Henry Homeyer has some suggestions for keeping the garden growing while you're away. 

Henry, what do you do with your gardens when you’re going away for a long period of time?

James Brady passed away earlier this week.

The former White House Press Secretary was also Vice Chair of the National Brain Injury Association. He came to NH for a technology expo focusing on new technology for people living with disabilities in 1995, not long after that he spoke with NHPR’s Laura Kiernan on our Perspectives program.

Boscawen Community Kitchen Survey Underway

Aug 1, 2014
Emily Corwin, NHPR News

A New Hampshire college student's proposal for a community kitchen in Boscawen is in line to undergo a USDA-funded feasibility study.

A community kitchen would provide farmers and entrepreneurs with access to processing, packaging and storing facilities. For smaller enterprises, the access to such a facility would mean a chance for expanded production and profits.

How Low Are Market Basket Prices, Really?

Aug 1, 2014
Halina Loft / NHPR

Loyal Market Basket customers will often say it's the low prices that keep them coming back. The chain has long been associated with bargain prices on brand-name items, and that was before former CEO Arthur T. Demoulas chose to give customers 4 percent off their entire purchase this year. 

But just how much cheaper is Market Basket, when compared with Hannaford and Shaw's?

NHPR/Michael Brindley

Many people are under the impression that the Market Basket workers they've seen protesting outside New Hampshire stores are on strike.

That's not the case, at least not for most of them.

"No, we're not striking. We're just rallying," said Justin Desjardins, a 22-year veteran of Market Basket who was protesting outside the downtown Concord store last week. "We all plan on rallying. They're really pushing the 71 stores, 71 rallies."

Most workers are still filling their shifts, but are protesting outside their stores during off-hours.

NPR

Earlier this week, longtime NPR reporter Margot Adler died. Morning Edition produced a great story about her career.

Austin Cowan NHPR

Sagamore-Hampton Golf Club in North Hampton has all the characteristics of a golf course. It has manicured fairways, rows of golf carts and a pristine clubhouse. Its patrons are all dressed in golfing garb, awaiting their turn to tee off down the first fairway. However, there is something a little odd about this course, something that doesn’t quite fit.

Amidst the traditional golfers are young kids holding soccer balls. They are here for a different game called FootGolf. That’s right, FootGolf, a sport that combines golf and soccer.

Courtesy Joe Del Russo

Someone in your family probably remembers a time when receiving a letter was unusual. The message was typically handwritten and personal, and it told you that someone in another part of the world thought enough about you to sit down, organize their thoughts and craft a message, just for you.

There are still places in New Hampshire where getting mail is just as special, mostly because of how it's delivered.

Brian Smestad, courtesy of Blue Tree LLC

A Mexican lime shortage had some NH bar owners worried. 

Margaritas, mojitos, gin and tonics... when you think of summer drinks, there's probably a lime in the picture. But up until a few weeks ago, this summer looked pretty grim – at least lime-wise.

“We were paying $50 a case to begin with,” says Jim Derosiers, “and then they jumped up to $150 a case and $175 a case.”

Desrosiers is the bar manager at Poco's Bow Street Cantina in Portsmouth. Every week, Poco's goes through about 15 cases of 250 limes each.

Archivists are all about anniversaries…we put a man on the moon 45 years ago this week, The Exchange marked that anniversary with help from the Sky Guys the other day. This week is also the 10th anniversary of Killington, VT officials meeting with NH Gov. Craig Benson about plans for secession and perhaps throwing in with the Granite State (more about that here).

nseika via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/z98qI

The world of crowdfunding is awash in potato salad, thanks to a spud enthusiast in Ohio called Zack Danger Brown. Promising only that, upon raising ten dollars, he was going to make potato salad – “I haven't decided what kind yet” – Brown raised nearly $50,000 in two weeks on Kickstarter. (The total was well over $70,000 before Kickstarter cancelled several donations it said couldn’t be verified.)

Sarah Thomas

Red Sox vs. Yankees. Coke vs. Pepsi. Facebook vs. Twitter.  And now – Chuckster’s Family Fun Park vs. Rocky Gorge 4 Seasons Golf Fairway.

Disc Golf: No Collared Shirts Required

Jul 11, 2014
Austin Cowan NHPR

Nestled deep in the woods of Canterbury, NH is a special type of golf course. No golf carts, clubs or balls can be found here. Bright polos and pastel shorts are left at the country club as well. Here, at Top O’ The Hill, disc golf is the game of choice.

For those that have never heard of the sport, think golf...but with a disc. It's that simple. Be careful to use the word "disc," however, never "Frisbee." This, I’m told, is seen as a slur in the disc world.

George Herman “Babe” Ruth made his major league debut this week 100 years ago (7/11/1914) with the Boston Red Sox. He had just 10 at-bats in 5 games that season, pitching four, and earning $2,500

10 years ago The Front Porch (NHPR’s nightly arts program until 2007) went to Conway, NH to speak with Julia Ruth Stevens, the Babe’s adopted daughter. Stevens spoke to NHPR’s John Walters about living with the most famous man in America, “we never thought about it when we were all at home. He was Daddy and we were just like any other family.”

Pages